Ed Parker on techniques

Ed Parker on techniques

Joined: September 30th, 2007, 10:05 am

November 19th, 2007, 7:51 pm #1

Taken from Rich Hales Ohana Kenpo page. http://www.ohanakenpo.com/Techniques.htm

"I teach Kenpo, not for the sake of teaching the techniques, but for the principles involved in them. And even then, these principles must be altered to fit the individual.

The reason I give my techniques names is because there are certain sequences associated with these terms. If I told a student tomorrow that I was going to teach him a counter version to a double hand grab, it's not as meaningful as when I say I'm going to teach him ‘Parting Wings.’

You’ve got to know how to vary things. A lot of the techniques I’ve worked with, they’re ideas, they’re not rules. At any given time, any of my moves can change from defense to offense, offense to defense.

Martial artists, and Kenpo people especially, become so involved in doing the techniques exactly right in such and such amount of time, that they get caught in a pattern that they can’t break. That’s not what they’re for. Specific moves, specific techniques are based, like the ABC’s in the English language or standard football plays.

You have to have a point of reference and from there the combinations are endless and limited only by universal laws, laws that you can’t change."


I think this is something we can all take to heart in our teachings and our studies.

Regards,
Grahm
A.K.K.F.
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Joined: February 1st, 2005, 2:47 pm

November 20th, 2007, 7:47 am #2

You know what?

Every time I read something like this I regret all over again never having met Mr Parker.

Damn it!

It is good, though, to hear The Man's words seemingly contradict the dogmatic people out there who say "this is the way you do the technique...", rather when we teach a technique we should be saying "this is the starting point from which you develop this technique for yourself".

The Point of Origin, as it were. From there, it evolves.
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Joined: November 24th, 2004, 9:07 pm

November 21st, 2007, 2:53 pm #3

When all is said and done - in the final analysis - at the end of the day - when push comes to shove - one's proficiency and effectiveness - or lack thereof - will all boil down to whether the individual has that one key ingredient - strong basics that he or she can use to (1) avoid getting hit and (2) deliver to weapons the targets.

Salute
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Joined: November 27th, 2006, 3:40 am

November 22nd, 2007, 8:23 pm #4

Taken from Rich Hales Ohana Kenpo page. http://www.ohanakenpo.com/Techniques.htm

"I teach Kenpo, not for the sake of teaching the techniques, but for the principles involved in them. And even then, these principles must be altered to fit the individual.

The reason I give my techniques names is because there are certain sequences associated with these terms. If I told a student tomorrow that I was going to teach him a counter version to a double hand grab, it's not as meaningful as when I say I'm going to teach him ‘Parting Wings.’

You’ve got to know how to vary things. A lot of the techniques I’ve worked with, they’re ideas, they’re not rules. At any given time, any of my moves can change from defense to offense, offense to defense.

Martial artists, and Kenpo people especially, become so involved in doing the techniques exactly right in such and such amount of time, that they get caught in a pattern that they can’t break. That’s not what they’re for. Specific moves, specific techniques are based, like the ABC’s in the English language or standard football plays.

You have to have a point of reference and from there the combinations are endless and limited only by universal laws, laws that you can’t change."


I think this is something we can all take to heart in our teachings and our studies.

Regards,
Grahm
A.K.K.F.
I recently spoke to a 5th degree (Kenpo) "black belt". With all due respect to his rank I almost fell over when he made the statement that he liked to focus on the techniques and didn't like getting bogged down on all the principles and concepts. (Hmm) So I made the statement to him that as kenpoist principles and concepts are what seperate us from the other arts. Unfortunatly this kind of thinking that its all about the techniques and not principles and concepts I think will hurt kenpo if it is allowed to go unchecked by unqualified instructors or by slap artist who think they can change a technique that teaches an important lesson because it dosen't work for them and come up with a tech. that misses the lesson it was designed to teach. Just me rambling sorry.
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Joined: February 13th, 2004, 1:04 am

November 23rd, 2007, 8:33 pm #5

My very point as I posted something earlier....Without proper understanding of Principles and Concepts then Kenpo is no more than any other...
Interesting Post...TCB
Sean Kelley
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