Do you really Train?

Do you really Train?

Joined: January 17th, 2008, 1:28 am

December 13th, 2008, 7:48 pm #1

Due to the nature of the neighborhood my students and myself live in and the type of school they are forced to go to the video is a reality for us. The situations are situations that they have to face multiple times a year. Although I strictly instill in each student that we do not teach to fight, but to avoid fighting, but if necessary we have the skills to eliminate the threat as quick as possible. (I love the quote, "we first walk, then run and if forced to we fight like hell")



My question is how many of us actually train to make it through, defuse or if need be come out victorious in these situations? Each fight is real and not a martial arts fight.

(Yes the fights are of some teens and some adults, because that's who we train)



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Last edited by SHBKF on December 13th, 2008, 7:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: October 21st, 2006, 9:13 pm

December 13th, 2008, 8:36 pm #2

Good idea isn't it Lavalle?

But before that, stay out of range and understand how to increase, decrease angle and maintain the gap.

Never white dot the loudest mouth, the quiet guy always has a plan and you rarely see it coming.

Clark
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Joined: January 17th, 2008, 1:28 am

December 13th, 2008, 9:16 pm #3

It's always the one standing in the blindspot that you have to be conscious of or you will wake up not knowing what happened.



I remember approx. a month after being out the hospital from being shot in '88, only having 20 to 30% use of my right arm and head still wrapped, I was jumped walking back from the store and although I had a plan of taking off on the guy directly in front of me, the guy just in my blindspot was the one that took the first blow that dislocated my jaw and put me down. The only thing that saved me from being back in the hospital were my boys/homies/street family turning the corner at the sametime I got hit.
Last edited by SHBKF on December 13th, 2008, 9:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: October 14th, 2005, 5:16 am

December 13th, 2008, 10:03 pm #4

Due to the nature of the neighborhood my students and myself live in and the type of school they are forced to go to the video is a reality for us. The situations are situations that they have to face multiple times a year. Although I strictly instill in each student that we do not teach to fight, but to avoid fighting, but if necessary we have the skills to eliminate the threat as quick as possible. (I love the quote, "we first walk, then run and if forced to we fight like hell")



My question is how many of us actually train to make it through, defuse or if need be come out victorious in these situations? Each fight is real and not a martial arts fight.

(Yes the fights are of some teens and some adults, because that's who we train)



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The reason many are not aware of or able to understand the fighting that is going on out there and the # 1 thing to do is try the best you can, to avoid this type of lifestyle and remove yourself from it if you possibly can.

Did you see anything of value in U Tube that will help you if you get into it with others?

Strength is essential and so are friends.

Did you see the aggression of the smaller person in the first fight...Anger and attitude is one that will get you through some of them, but if you can avoid, you are best to do that.

Thanks for the interesting Post/thread...

Looking to see what others have to say. I'll comment more based on others input.

Regards,
Gary
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Joined: January 17th, 2008, 1:28 am

December 13th, 2008, 10:23 pm #5

strength of friends I would say. I have very few friends that I will trust to have my back in these situation and even fewer that are martial artist.

Most of my friends or the few I call my friends I trust to walk me away from a situation before it escalates and vice versa, but those are the same friends when we are not able to walk away will not run and leave me hanging even when the shots are heard. They are the type that believe in the saying, "We came together, We leave together" and have proved on many occassions as we were growing up. I thank God that I have had people in my life like that, because in my younger years I loved the fight and didn't care who you were or how big you were, I've only been over 200lbs since I hit 30, I was always the skinniest on the block. So these individuals constantly walked me out of the club or sat me down if something was about to go down. The crazy thing is I have always been the quiet one that just sat there and smiled (Hince the name Big Smiley), until you walked up in my face.

One of my older homies who just got out of the penn. after 16years, I've been tutoring his son in algebra this semester, he was talking about the old days before he went in and couldn't believe how much I've changed my life around...LOL

Emersing(sp) myself in Kenpo I say has helped me a lot and many of my students.
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Joined: October 14th, 2005, 5:16 am

December 13th, 2008, 11:25 pm #6

Your friend that got out of the joint, did he do any studying and attempt to make his life better?

You have to be careful regarding that particular situation I would think. Helping his son is good, the thing to do is try and not change your life to accompany his.

BKF is your Kenpo I believe? The main person you should talk to is GM Steve Muhammad, I would think about the continuing friendship, and get some guidence and stay in touch with GMSM.

Being a retired LEO and USMC he has the knowledge to help you... IMHO

Regards,
Gary
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Joined: January 17th, 2008, 1:28 am

December 14th, 2008, 2:00 am #7

Help with what?

This is what I chose to do to give back to my community and others like the one I grew up in. I tutor the children of people I grew up with that are in jail or deceased, due to the way in which we chose to live our life. I assist with college applications, financial aid and scholarships to keep them from making the mistakes I made and their parents or older siblings. The ones coming home if they haven't gotten their GED or HS Diploma, if they choose to I help them find a program.

I am a member of the BKF and I make every effort possible to allow our students to use their training as a positive outlet to give them other options then the streets. I train them to walk away if possible, if not eliminate the threat as quick as possible to get away.

I talk to Sijo Muhammad occasionally and speak with Senior Grandmaster Donnie Wiliams frequently, but I talk to Grandmaster Robert Temple the most about these situations of the street.

The original post is how many instructor and martial artist train to make it through a street situation, whether by avoiding, defusing or combating?

I'm sure there are some on here that have dealt with the streets and I would like to know their experience and do they train for any future occurances?
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Joined: October 14th, 2005, 5:16 am

December 14th, 2008, 5:07 am #8

I train for it all the time myself, I try to stay dilligent in that effort.

I think it is very important and what you are asking is just a normal way of living for me. But you need to add the harmony and tranquility factor also. One of the mistakes I find in AK is how they look at Yin and Yang.

Hope others will answer your questions..

My son, it is a way of life for him, his sons also train.

Regards,
Gary
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Joined: January 17th, 2008, 1:28 am

December 14th, 2008, 8:17 pm #9

Just making an assumption, but I think a lot of people do not respond, due to them never having been in a situation where they actually had to defend themselves. I have met many martial artist that have never been in a fight, not even in school or playground. That's good and it is a reality for them, but for others it is not a reality for their students. I want to know how do they train for the streets. Also the instructors who have not used their Kenpo before for defense of self or loved ones, what do they use to instruct their students to enable them to handle a real life situation.?

We've added a saying in our class before we start each class and before we leave, which breaks down "Discipline, Respect and Honor" my prayer being that they will govern their lives by the terms and teachings.

I think most people are more fascinated with the story book version of the art than the real life applications, and although Amen has created a lot of people who do not like him on here I would definitely trust him to have my back in the streets, because you might not like his techniques and forms, but the man can fight. My cousin and my instructor has vouched for that and these are 2 people I trust with my life.
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Joined: May 3rd, 2005, 8:25 pm

December 14th, 2008, 8:32 pm #10

...people are just sensibly doing other things with their Sundays, maybe they're not responding to your, "question," because it isn't a real question.

It's a rhetorical question, and it boils down to this: I'm a fighter, and you guys aren't.

In answer, I'd say that pretty much everybody with a brain and a decent instructor sooner or later (usually sooner) is faced up with the, "What Will You Do When..?" one way or another. It's a common question, and a good one...

And here's my answer, for what it's worth: if I can't avoid the prob in the first place, or talk my way out of it, or run like hell, I'll do about the best I can.

Waddya want, wicker?

Thanks,
R.M. Robertson
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