Crosstraining in other arts..

Crosstraining in other arts..

Joined: June 1st, 2005, 5:34 am

August 24th, 2007, 9:01 pm #1

I personally have crosstrained in Muay Thai, Boxing, and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, and continue to train in Jiu-Jitsu and Muay Thai along with my Kenpo. I would also eventually like to work Judo, and possibly Sambo in there as well.

I was curious what, if any crosstraining others have done, and how it has helped either their Kenpo or their all around skill in general.

I would also love to hear from anyone who has chosen not to cross train, for some specific reason... I obviously am not of that group, but would love to hear if someone is.


I have found a much greater understanding of how bodys move, and especially Balance, and disrupting others balance from the Jiu-Jitsu. I believe that its directly because of the cross training and I doubt I would have the same understanding with out it.

Thanks in advance for your input..
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Joined: December 16th, 2004, 8:13 pm

August 24th, 2007, 10:31 pm #2

I've found it good to train with different people in various styles just to gain new perspectives on what you're already doing.

Other arts that specialize in an area like BJJ groundfighting are useful to expand your kenpo just as Kali can expand your knowledge of stick fighting to enhance your club techniques.

To me it's all kenpo, meaning it's more principles I can add to my techinques to make them mine. I've done Sambo and I learned some great stuff about throws that relate to techniques we have in Kenpo. I also have been training with a BJJ club for a few years and I've learned some good stuff about contact manipulation that I use in my techniques.

And Joe Lewis is a big part of our school, he's here more than a few times a year and has been Mr. Nackords teacher since the 60's. Joe Lewis KB is a huge part of our system that we teach in the school and Mr. Nackord is an 8th under him so we teach his system along with Kenpo and have been doing so since the 60's.

And you can do another art just for enjoyment. I know a man who loves ancient weapons. He takes regular trips to China to work on his Chinese sword routines and Tai Chi paractice. He's indeed a Kenpoist but he does this just because he wants to.

Kenpo is a great art full of deep concepts but sometimes we cannot see everything with our own eyes. Training with another art or other Kenpoists can really expand one's horizons and one's Kenpo.

But Kenpo is still the art of my heart.

Take care
Jonathan
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Joined: January 23rd, 2004, 8:11 pm

August 24th, 2007, 11:27 pm #3

I personally have crosstrained in Muay Thai, Boxing, and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, and continue to train in Jiu-Jitsu and Muay Thai along with my Kenpo. I would also eventually like to work Judo, and possibly Sambo in there as well.

I was curious what, if any crosstraining others have done, and how it has helped either their Kenpo or their all around skill in general.

I would also love to hear from anyone who has chosen not to cross train, for some specific reason... I obviously am not of that group, but would love to hear if someone is.


I have found a much greater understanding of how bodys move, and especially Balance, and disrupting others balance from the Jiu-Jitsu. I believe that its directly because of the cross training and I doubt I would have the same understanding with out it.

Thanks in advance for your input..
I personally have crosstrained in Muay Thai, Boxing, and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, and continue to train in Jiu-Jitsu and Muay Thai along with my Kenpo. I would also eventually like to work Judo, and possibly Sambo in there as well.

I was curious what, if any crosstraining others have done, and how it has helped either their Kenpo or their all around skill in general.

I would also love to hear from anyone who has chosen not to cross train, for some specific reason... I obviously am not of that group, but would love to hear if someone is.


I have found a much greater understanding of how bodys move, and especially Balance, and disrupting others balance from the Jiu-Jitsu. I believe that its directly because of the cross training and I doubt I would have the same understanding with out it.

Thanks in advance for your input..
-----------------------------------------------------

Kenpo is and always will be my base art. I cross train in Arnis and BJJ. I feel that its important to see what else is out there and also, how other arts train. Some, who shall remain nameless, have felt that crosstraining isn't necessary, as everything there is to know, is already in Kenpo, and if we don't see it, then its because our instructor doesnt see it, therefore, can't teach it to us. I think that only a part of that is true. Sure, there are many aspects to Kenpo. However, by cross training, we get to see another side to things.

I've always felt that if someone really wants to improve on a certain area or expand their knowledge further, looking at another art, may be necessary. For example: Kenpo has takedown defense. However, it doesnt specialize in takedowns, like someone who trains in BJJ, Sambo or Judo does. Are you going to get that same feeling? Probably not. Work with someone who does BJJ on takedown defense. Explore how they apply their takedowns, take the Kenpo defense, and see if it works. If it does great, if not, see how you can make it work against someone really trying to take you down. The same thing can be said about the Filipino arts. They're all pretty much weapon based, so who better to go to, than someone that specializes in weapons.

I dont think someone should give up Kenpo to train in some other art, but there is certainly no harm in working out and exchanging ideas.

Mike
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Joined: June 21st, 2004, 7:05 pm

August 25th, 2007, 5:48 am #4

I really have had a great experience training in BJJ. A lot of the main principles are similar to kenpo.
Last edited by Jeff1121 on August 25th, 2007, 5:52 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: June 21st, 2004, 7:05 pm

August 25th, 2007, 5:50 am #5

I've found it good to train with different people in various styles just to gain new perspectives on what you're already doing.

Other arts that specialize in an area like BJJ groundfighting are useful to expand your kenpo just as Kali can expand your knowledge of stick fighting to enhance your club techniques.

To me it's all kenpo, meaning it's more principles I can add to my techinques to make them mine. I've done Sambo and I learned some great stuff about throws that relate to techniques we have in Kenpo. I also have been training with a BJJ club for a few years and I've learned some good stuff about contact manipulation that I use in my techniques.

And Joe Lewis is a big part of our school, he's here more than a few times a year and has been Mr. Nackords teacher since the 60's. Joe Lewis KB is a huge part of our system that we teach in the school and Mr. Nackord is an 8th under him so we teach his system along with Kenpo and have been doing so since the 60's.

And you can do another art just for enjoyment. I know a man who loves ancient weapons. He takes regular trips to China to work on his Chinese sword routines and Tai Chi paractice. He's indeed a Kenpoist but he does this just because he wants to.

Kenpo is a great art full of deep concepts but sometimes we cannot see everything with our own eyes. Training with another art or other Kenpoists can really expand one's horizons and one's Kenpo.

But Kenpo is still the art of my heart.

Take care
Jonathan
cross training is important but dont forget the basic kenpo principals that follow in other arts.
-jeff l
Last edited by Jeff1121 on August 25th, 2007, 5:51 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 16th, 2004, 5:32 pm

August 26th, 2007, 3:52 pm #6

I personally have crosstrained in Muay Thai, Boxing, and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, and continue to train in Jiu-Jitsu and Muay Thai along with my Kenpo. I would also eventually like to work Judo, and possibly Sambo in there as well.

I was curious what, if any crosstraining others have done, and how it has helped either their Kenpo or their all around skill in general.

I would also love to hear from anyone who has chosen not to cross train, for some specific reason... I obviously am not of that group, but would love to hear if someone is.


I have found a much greater understanding of how bodys move, and especially Balance, and disrupting others balance from the Jiu-Jitsu. I believe that its directly because of the cross training and I doubt I would have the same understanding with out it.

Thanks in advance for your input..
I have cross-trained in Shotokan, Aiki-Jujitu, Escrima, and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. It helped me fill gaps in my skill and made me a more open-minded and better Kenpoist.

You will probably hear similar stories from many people here. Fortunately, the most overzealous anti-crosstrainers have been banned from KenpoNet.

Regards,

Alan Wortman aka Old Fat Kenpoka
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Joined: January 23rd, 2004, 8:11 pm

August 26th, 2007, 6:27 pm #7

I really have had a great experience training in BJJ. A lot of the main principles are similar to kenpo.
Absolutely!!! Its amazing how nice certain arts blend together.

Mike
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Joined: January 23rd, 2004, 8:11 pm

August 26th, 2007, 6:28 pm #8

I have cross-trained in Shotokan, Aiki-Jujitu, Escrima, and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. It helped me fill gaps in my skill and made me a more open-minded and better Kenpoist.

You will probably hear similar stories from many people here. Fortunately, the most overzealous anti-crosstrainers have been banned from KenpoNet.

Regards,

Alan Wortman aka Old Fat Kenpoka
You will probably hear similar stories from many people here. Fortunately, the most overzealous anti-crosstrainers have been banned from KenpoNet.

Regards,

Alan Wortman aka Old Fat Kenpoka
---------------------------------------------

Whats up Alan!!

Yes, the above comment is true. They've been banned from a few others as well. LOL!

Mike
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