core techniques

core techniques

Joined: August 8th, 2004, 5:18 pm

April 6th, 2008, 3:28 am #1

I am working on a project and I was looking for some input.
I would like to know what my fellow kenpoists out there would list as the top 20 or so "core" techniques.
I am asking what your opinion is. I will not be looking to criticize or insult anyones opinion as that is not the purpose of this post.
I appreciate your contributions in this.
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Joined: September 30th, 2007, 10:05 am

April 6th, 2008, 7:22 am #2

Well, some techniques that have always stood out for me are:

(in no order)

Darting Mace
Thundering Hammers
Five Swords
Triggered Salute
Thrusting Wedge
Mace of Aggression
Snapping Twig
Parting Wings
Twisted Twig
Circling the Horizon
Circling Destruction
Clipping the Storm
Falcons of Force
Delayed Sword
Detour from Doom
Entwined Maces
Intellectual Departure
Shielding Hammer
Hooking Wings
Deceptive Panther
Conquering Shield
Grasping Eagles

I listed ones that stood out to me without analyzing them too much. As far as them being the "core" of the system... I dont know. These techniques suit my style and body type well and I think are great representations of the concepts and principles in American Kenpo.

Respectfully,
Grahm
A.K.K.F.
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Joined: August 8th, 2004, 5:18 pm

April 6th, 2008, 4:07 pm #3

i appreciate your time very much. manyof those are my prefferences too. thank you again
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Joined: September 30th, 2007, 10:05 am

April 6th, 2008, 5:54 pm #4

Anytime.. I just like making lists. Haahaha! Best of luck with your project.

Respectfully,
Grahm
AKKF
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Joined: April 5th, 2005, 1:14 am

April 6th, 2008, 6:42 pm #5

I am working on a project and I was looking for some input.
I would like to know what my fellow kenpoists out there would list as the top 20 or so "core" techniques.
I am asking what your opinion is. I will not be looking to criticize or insult anyones opinion as that is not the purpose of this post.
I appreciate your contributions in this.
Mr. Parker said something to the effect that if you knew form four you knew kenpo and I can't argue with that. Not many principles you can't teach from form four. However, not all of the techniques are what I would consider core techniques. I used the web of knowledge and tried to pick out techniques for each category that I could use to demonstrate the principles of kenpo succinctly. For what it's worth, here's my list:

Crossing Talon
Triggered Salute
Snapping Twig
Thrusting Wedge
Five Swords
Thundering Hammers
Sleeper
Thrusting Salute
Crashing Wings
Broken Gift
Crushing Hammers
Tripping Arrow
Cross of Destruction
Intercepting the Ram
Evading the Storm
Brushing the Storm
Thrusting Lance
Capturing the Rod
The Bear and the Ram
Snakes of Wisdom


Is that 20? Not easy but an interesting exercise.

Take it out on the heavy bag,

Chuck Peterson
Peterson_charlie@hotmail.com
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Joined: August 8th, 2004, 5:18 pm

April 6th, 2008, 7:49 pm #6

great feedback. i appreciate your time as well.
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Joined: February 4th, 2004, 8:13 pm

April 6th, 2008, 8:48 pm #7

I am working on a project and I was looking for some input.
I would like to know what my fellow kenpoists out there would list as the top 20 or so "core" techniques.
I am asking what your opinion is. I will not be looking to criticize or insult anyones opinion as that is not the purpose of this post.
I appreciate your contributions in this.
David,

I hope all is well with you, my friend.

First of all we must understand that every technique teaches a lesson. The techniques themselves are not the lesson--it's the principles within the techniques that matter. We teach techniques to allow the principles to be ingrained into our psyche so that we understand why we are learning each technique.

As you know there are many ways to learn every technique in our system. As long as the principles are understood that is what counts. There are many variations around the world. We also must understand that we need know how to tailor the techniques to each individual. I teach the techniques in the ideal phase one way so all are learning the same, but then I tailor each technique to the individual, or at least give them freedom of thought and expression on their own with each technique.

Mr. Parker had a vision when creating and revising our great system. If you look at all our techniques and break them down, you really only have 30-40 actual techniques since many follow the same patterns of movement.

I like to look at family relationships or the idea of category completion to help me understand the concept behind what Mr. Parker was teaching. It's obvious you don't need 154 techniques to know how to fight or defend yourself. You also don't need extensions to know how to fight. If you can't stop the guy in the first 2-3 strikes, your Kenpo needs work.

Our system is the analytical study of motion. You can only move so many ways. Our techniques are a by-product of that. I like to keep things simple when I am teaching so that the students grasp the concept of movement.

I teach my students to look at the body and think about the ways someone can attack. If we look at just an arm (whether it be a punch, push or grab), we really have two options: 1) we can go to the inside, or 2) we can go to the outside. Then you have his right and left. So that becomes four: Inside his right, inside his left, outside his right, outside his left. (We establish this idea right in the yellow belt by the way: Delayed sword-inside the right, Aggressive twins/Alternating maces-outside the left, Sword of destruction-inside the left and Attacking mace-outside the right). When you then think of yourself, you also have a right and left arm. With that being said we have eight possibilities (4 options x 2 hands = 8). Then I teach them to think about three zones or quadrants: high, middle and low (high=head area/middle=solar plexus or body area/low=groin or leg area). One place where the zones come into play is the hanging family (Dance of Death=low, Thundering Hammers = middle, Sleeper = high).

So in a street situation, where you must dominate, you will attack the attack and either go inside to the centerline (with your mass, penetrating the spinal ring to manipulate the skeleton) or your will go to the outside of the body and break it down, obviously keeping in mind the dimensions of motion: Height, width and depth. The more you know about the human body the better you will be.

There are many ideas throughout our techniques, but I firmly believe that without proper body mechanics and the understanding of physics, you will lack in your techniques.

I realize I blabbed on a bit here, but I thought I would share my perspective so you know where I am coming from. Now to answer your question, I am going to put a generic list of what I feel are top techniques for one reason or another (I won't mention the reasons since this post is already long enough). There are many others, but these one's pop in my head:

Delayed Sword
Intellectual Departure
Dance of Death
Lone Kimono
Glancing Salute
Thrusting Salute
Five Swords
Grip of Death
Crossing Talon
Shielding Hammer
Reversing Mace
Snapping Twig
Leaping Crane
Parting Wings
Thundering Hammers
Circling Wing
Darting Mace
Hooking Wings
Flashing Wings
Shield and Mace
Heavenly Ascent
Falcons of Force

Let us keep in mind that the most important techniques are really within the orange and purple, some blue and little green. All have importance, but these are most important. Think about why extensions were put on the orange, purple, blue and green.

Take Care,

Michael Miller, CKF

Last edited by millhouse23 on April 6th, 2008, 8:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 28th, 2008, 4:51 am

April 7th, 2008, 2:35 am #8

I am working on a project and I was looking for some input.
I would like to know what my fellow kenpoists out there would list as the top 20 or so "core" techniques.
I am asking what your opinion is. I will not be looking to criticize or insult anyones opinion as that is not the purpose of this post.
I appreciate your contributions in this.
I try to take the techniques that I find are the most awkward and physically challenging and work those on a consistent basis. To me the yellow is a very strong core to work from so I will start there.
1. Grasp of Death
2. Captured Twigs
3. Glancing Salute
4. Thrusting Prongs
5. Striking the Serpents Head
6. Crashing Wings
7. Twirling Wings
8. Crushing Hammer
9. Squeezing the Peach
10. Sleeper
11. Gift in Return
12. Flight to Freedom
13. Repeated Devastation
14. Crossed Twigs
15. Twist of Fate
16. Broken Ram
17. Squatting Sacrifice
18. Menacing Twirl
19. Courting the Tigers
20. Dominating Circles

These are a few techniques that rarely come up at seminars or technique lines Because they can be tough to get through.
Have Fun
Mahalo
Joe Stricklett
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Joined: August 8th, 2004, 5:18 pm

April 7th, 2008, 2:41 am #9

David,

I hope all is well with you, my friend.

First of all we must understand that every technique teaches a lesson. The techniques themselves are not the lesson--it's the principles within the techniques that matter. We teach techniques to allow the principles to be ingrained into our psyche so that we understand why we are learning each technique.

As you know there are many ways to learn every technique in our system. As long as the principles are understood that is what counts. There are many variations around the world. We also must understand that we need know how to tailor the techniques to each individual. I teach the techniques in the ideal phase one way so all are learning the same, but then I tailor each technique to the individual, or at least give them freedom of thought and expression on their own with each technique.

Mr. Parker had a vision when creating and revising our great system. If you look at all our techniques and break them down, you really only have 30-40 actual techniques since many follow the same patterns of movement.

I like to look at family relationships or the idea of category completion to help me understand the concept behind what Mr. Parker was teaching. It's obvious you don't need 154 techniques to know how to fight or defend yourself. You also don't need extensions to know how to fight. If you can't stop the guy in the first 2-3 strikes, your Kenpo needs work.

Our system is the analytical study of motion. You can only move so many ways. Our techniques are a by-product of that. I like to keep things simple when I am teaching so that the students grasp the concept of movement.

I teach my students to look at the body and think about the ways someone can attack. If we look at just an arm (whether it be a punch, push or grab), we really have two options: 1) we can go to the inside, or 2) we can go to the outside. Then you have his right and left. So that becomes four: Inside his right, inside his left, outside his right, outside his left. (We establish this idea right in the yellow belt by the way: Delayed sword-inside the right, Aggressive twins/Alternating maces-outside the left, Sword of destruction-inside the left and Attacking mace-outside the right). When you then think of yourself, you also have a right and left arm. With that being said we have eight possibilities (4 options x 2 hands = 8). Then I teach them to think about three zones or quadrants: high, middle and low (high=head area/middle=solar plexus or body area/low=groin or leg area). One place where the zones come into play is the hanging family (Dance of Death=low, Thundering Hammers = middle, Sleeper = high).

So in a street situation, where you must dominate, you will attack the attack and either go inside to the centerline (with your mass, penetrating the spinal ring to manipulate the skeleton) or your will go to the outside of the body and break it down, obviously keeping in mind the dimensions of motion: Height, width and depth. The more you know about the human body the better you will be.

There are many ideas throughout our techniques, but I firmly believe that without proper body mechanics and the understanding of physics, you will lack in your techniques.

I realize I blabbed on a bit here, but I thought I would share my perspective so you know where I am coming from. Now to answer your question, I am going to put a generic list of what I feel are top techniques for one reason or another (I won't mention the reasons since this post is already long enough). There are many others, but these one's pop in my head:

Delayed Sword
Intellectual Departure
Dance of Death
Lone Kimono
Glancing Salute
Thrusting Salute
Five Swords
Grip of Death
Crossing Talon
Shielding Hammer
Reversing Mace
Snapping Twig
Leaping Crane
Parting Wings
Thundering Hammers
Circling Wing
Darting Mace
Hooking Wings
Flashing Wings
Shield and Mace
Heavenly Ascent
Falcons of Force

Let us keep in mind that the most important techniques are really within the orange and purple, some blue and little green. All have importance, but these are most important. Think about why extensions were put on the orange, purple, blue and green.

Take Care,

Michael Miller, CKF
hey mike,
thanks for the input. much appreciated. All is well here, hope the same goes for you.
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Joined: August 8th, 2004, 5:18 pm

April 7th, 2008, 2:44 am #10

I try to take the techniques that I find are the most awkward and physically challenging and work those on a consistent basis. To me the yellow is a very strong core to work from so I will start there.
1. Grasp of Death
2. Captured Twigs
3. Glancing Salute
4. Thrusting Prongs
5. Striking the Serpents Head
6. Crashing Wings
7. Twirling Wings
8. Crushing Hammer
9. Squeezing the Peach
10. Sleeper
11. Gift in Return
12. Flight to Freedom
13. Repeated Devastation
14. Crossed Twigs
15. Twist of Fate
16. Broken Ram
17. Squatting Sacrifice
18. Menacing Twirl
19. Courting the Tigers
20. Dominating Circles

These are a few techniques that rarely come up at seminars or technique lines Because they can be tough to get through.
Have Fun
Mahalo
Joe Stricklett
Thanks for the quick response. I like that there are some ones as you said that dont come up at seminars or tech lines much but are ver useful and good to work on. thanks for the time and input.
-David
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