What does good bread pudding have in it?

What does good bread pudding have in it?

Joined: June 5th, 2006, 5:33 pm

February 28th, 2012, 1:54 am #1

Ok, so I was making bread here at mom's. She said she had fresh yeast in the freezer, and I gathered up all the other ingredients and began. She only has a hand mixer and I wasn't sure I had the strength to mix it by hand, but it was really easy. However, her frozen yeast was dated 2010 and I was already halfway into the recipe before I checked the date on it, so I used it. It rose, but not well. So I thought I'd make bread pudding out of the rest of the rolls.

I've never made or eaten bread pudding, but it always looks good when they make it on tv.

I've found several recipes online, and most have the basic ingredients and have all these ingredients as optional: cinnamon, nutmeg, raisins, pecans.

Which of these are put into a normal bread pudding?

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Joined: October 29th, 2005, 6:29 pm

February 28th, 2012, 2:01 am #2

and some raisans I guess.
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Joined: May 21st, 2006, 4:46 am

February 28th, 2012, 2:24 am #3

Ok, so I was making bread here at mom's. She said she had fresh yeast in the freezer, and I gathered up all the other ingredients and began. She only has a hand mixer and I wasn't sure I had the strength to mix it by hand, but it was really easy. However, her frozen yeast was dated 2010 and I was already halfway into the recipe before I checked the date on it, so I used it. It rose, but not well. So I thought I'd make bread pudding out of the rest of the rolls.

I've never made or eaten bread pudding, but it always looks good when they make it on tv.

I've found several recipes online, and most have the basic ingredients and have all these ingredients as optional: cinnamon, nutmeg, raisins, pecans.

Which of these are put into a normal bread pudding?

------
The road to success is always under construction.
I've got yeast from around 2000 in the freezer, and it works fine. You do need to thaw it, though. This can be done in the warm water, but you need to let it sit for awhile. The frozen yeast is really going to cool off the water it's dissolved in.

Now, as for bread pudding...Stacey, I'm shocked!! LOL OK, I'm not a bread pudding eater, and have never made it, but the good stuff seems to have lots of eggs in it, raisins or other dried fruits and some type of sauce. Stacey, of course, just pours Jack Daniels over hers, but I'd go for a caramel or maple sauce. In fact, real maple syrup might be really good! (with a shot of Jack, of course!).
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Joined: May 24th, 2006, 3:12 pm

February 28th, 2012, 8:58 am #4

Ok, so I was making bread here at mom's. She said she had fresh yeast in the freezer, and I gathered up all the other ingredients and began. She only has a hand mixer and I wasn't sure I had the strength to mix it by hand, but it was really easy. However, her frozen yeast was dated 2010 and I was already halfway into the recipe before I checked the date on it, so I used it. It rose, but not well. So I thought I'd make bread pudding out of the rest of the rolls.

I've never made or eaten bread pudding, but it always looks good when they make it on tv.

I've found several recipes online, and most have the basic ingredients and have all these ingredients as optional: cinnamon, nutmeg, raisins, pecans.

Which of these are put into a normal bread pudding?

------
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It works beautifully with other fruit - I found a recipe for bread pud with plums which was nice anf have since made it with soft fruits such as raspberries and blueberries.
As I remember it is just a custard mix as usual - I can't remember but will hunt the recipe out if you are interested
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Joined: June 5th, 2006, 5:33 pm

February 28th, 2012, 4:22 pm #5

The recipe I found online, when I put the terms bread pudding and dinner rolls in the search box, said to use six large rolls and it was to go in a 9x13 pan. I only had five medium sized rolls, so I just made croutons. It was easier, and mom doesn't eat a lot of desserts anyway, so I would have eaten most of it and then been ticked at myself. But when I'm home again, I'm definitely going to make one.

On tv, I think they made one out of doughnuts or cinnamon rolls and it looked yummy.

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Joined: May 24th, 2006, 3:12 pm

February 28th, 2012, 4:41 pm #6

I have tried it with other fruits too - equally good

Ingredients
6-8large plums, halved and stoned
125g caster sugar, plus extra for the plums
About 1/2 loaf of slightly stale white bread
25g softened unsalted butter
1 vanilla pod
500ml double cream
200ml full cream milk
3 eggs
2 egg yolks



Method

1.Lay the plum halves cut side up in an ovenproof dish and place 1/2 teaspoon of caster sugar in the centre of each one. Bake in a fairly hot oven (200°C/gas 6) for 15 -20 mins, until they are tender and the juices have run. Remove from the oven and leave to cool.
2.Cut the crusts off the bread and cut it into slices that roughly correspond to the depth of the ovenproof dish you have chosen for the pudding: when laid in the dish at a slight angle from the vertical, the slices should come close to or level with the top. Spread the slices with the butter, then use any leftover butter to grease the dish.
3.Split the vanilla pod open lengthways and place it in a pan with the cream and milk. Bring them almost to the boil, then remove from the heat and leave to infuse for a few minutes. In a large bowl, whisk the eggs, egg yolks and caster sugar together until they are thoroughly blended.
4.Remove the vanilla pod from the hot cream mixture (you can rinse it, wrap it in clingfilm and use it again), then pour the cream over the eggs and sugar, whisking all the time, until you have a thin but smooth and well-blended custard. (If you're in a hurry or you just simply want to make life easier, you can omit the vanilla pod and then you don't have to scald the cream and milk: simply whisk cold into the eggs and sugar.)
5.Arrange the buttered bread slices in your greased dish - if possible, at an angle somewhere between vertical and 45 degrees. Place the roasted plum halves between the bread slices, trying to distribute them fairly evenly throughout the pudding. Plug any glaring gaps by cutting leftover bread slices to fit; your dish should end up full but not overcrammed. Any syrupy juices from the dish in which the plums were baked can be poured over at this stage.
6.Bake in the over for 30-40 mins.
The River Cottage Cookbook by Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, published by Collins, priced at £17.99 in paperback
Last edited by Pollyuk on February 28th, 2012, 9:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: June 5th, 2006, 5:33 pm

February 28th, 2012, 8:16 pm #7

I've got yeast from around 2000 in the freezer, and it works fine. You do need to thaw it, though. This can be done in the warm water, but you need to let it sit for awhile. The frozen yeast is really going to cool off the water it's dissolved in.

Now, as for bread pudding...Stacey, I'm shocked!! LOL OK, I'm not a bread pudding eater, and have never made it, but the good stuff seems to have lots of eggs in it, raisins or other dried fruits and some type of sauce. Stacey, of course, just pours Jack Daniels over hers, but I'd go for a caramel or maple sauce. In fact, real maple syrup might be really good! (with a shot of Jack, of course!).
She probably bought it in 2009 and didn't put it in the freezer until 2011, iykwim. I did the sugar test on it before putting it in the bread and it did puff a bit so I thought it would be ok. It did rise a little, just not enough to eat.

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Joined: June 5th, 2006, 5:33 pm

February 28th, 2012, 8:17 pm #8

I have tried it with other fruits too - equally good

Ingredients
6-8large plums, halved and stoned
125g caster sugar, plus extra for the plums
About 1/2 loaf of slightly stale white bread
25g softened unsalted butter
1 vanilla pod
500ml double cream
200ml full cream milk
3 eggs
2 egg yolks



Method

1.Lay the plum halves cut side up in an ovenproof dish and place 1/2 teaspoon of caster sugar in the centre of each one. Bake in a fairly hot oven (200°C/gas 6) for 15 -20 mins, until they are tender and the juices have run. Remove from the oven and leave to cool.
2.Cut the crusts off the bread and cut it into slices that roughly correspond to the depth of the ovenproof dish you have chosen for the pudding: when laid in the dish at a slight angle from the vertical, the slices should come close to or level with the top. Spread the slices with the butter, then use any leftover butter to grease the dish.
3.Split the vanilla pod open lengthways and place it in a pan with the cream and milk. Bring them almost to the boil, then remove from the heat and leave to infuse for a few minutes. In a large bowl, whisk the eggs, egg yolks and caster sugar together until they are thoroughly blended.
4.Remove the vanilla pod from the hot cream mixture (you can rinse it, wrap it in clingfilm and use it again), then pour the cream over the eggs and sugar, whisking all the time, until you have a thin but smooth and well-blended custard. (If you're in a hurry or you just simply want to make life easier, you can omit the vanilla pod and then you don't have to scald the cream and milk: simply whisk cold into the eggs and sugar.)
5.Arrange the buttered bread slices in your greased dish - if possible, at an angle somewhere between vertical and 45 degrees. Place the roasted plum halves between the bread slices, trying to distribute them fairly evenly throughout the pudding. Plug any glaring gaps by cutting leftover bread slices to fit; your dish should end up full but not overcrammed. Any syrupy juices from the dish in which the plums were baked can be poured over at this stage.
6.Bake in the over for 30-40 mins.
The River Cottage Cookbook by Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall, published by Collins, priced at £17.99 in paperback
What do you suppose a substitute for a vanilla pod would be? And I suppose castor sugar is white sugar?

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Joined: May 24th, 2006, 3:12 pm

February 28th, 2012, 9:27 pm #9

castor sugar is just white sugar - it is finer than granulated but I never buy it as it costs more!
As for the vanilla, either miss it out or add a drop or two of vanilla extract
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Joined: October 28th, 2005, 10:05 am

February 29th, 2012, 6:16 pm #10

I've got yeast from around 2000 in the freezer, and it works fine. You do need to thaw it, though. This can be done in the warm water, but you need to let it sit for awhile. The frozen yeast is really going to cool off the water it's dissolved in.

Now, as for bread pudding...Stacey, I'm shocked!! LOL OK, I'm not a bread pudding eater, and have never made it, but the good stuff seems to have lots of eggs in it, raisins or other dried fruits and some type of sauce. Stacey, of course, just pours Jack Daniels over hers, but I'd go for a caramel or maple sauce. In fact, real maple syrup might be really good! (with a shot of Jack, of course!).
as I dangerously eye the (oddly out of place in my home) loaf of white bread and wish I had some Jack in the house.... LOL!!! Sounds so good.....
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