Propagating clematis

Propagating clematis

Joined: May 21st, 2006, 4:46 am

April 10th, 2012, 1:58 pm #1

I have a big clematis that I wanted to divide because I wanted some free plants. I had looked it up on the internet a couple of times and never had a definitive answer. Yesterday, I JUST DID IT. I dug it up, split it into 3 pieces and replanted one of them. I put the other two in pots to transplant later. Keep your fingers crossed!

Last night, after I had done this (of course)...I finally found the answer in a book. It said you can split clematis, as I did, but you can also make new plants by simple layering. This means that you lay a shoot on the ground, nick it slightly with a knife, and weigh it down with a rock until it takes root (6-12 months, usually). This has the advantage of not hacking up the parent plant (keep your fingers crossed for me). Layering is the method I used to start 3 new snowball bushes (viburnum), so--as simple as it sounds--I know it works.

I am on the hunt for free plants for my new house. Other than a few evergreens, which I will have to buy, I don't intend to buy anything. Any and all suggestions will be appreciated! (especially if they are deer-proof).
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Joined: June 5th, 2006, 5:33 pm

April 10th, 2012, 7:30 pm #2

I'm doing the layering method with rosemary right now and have several new plants ready to put somewhere new.

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The road to success is always under construction.
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Joined: May 21st, 2006, 5:50 pm

April 10th, 2012, 8:46 pm #3

I have a big clematis that I wanted to divide because I wanted some free plants. I had looked it up on the internet a couple of times and never had a definitive answer. Yesterday, I JUST DID IT. I dug it up, split it into 3 pieces and replanted one of them. I put the other two in pots to transplant later. Keep your fingers crossed!

Last night, after I had done this (of course)...I finally found the answer in a book. It said you can split clematis, as I did, but you can also make new plants by simple layering. This means that you lay a shoot on the ground, nick it slightly with a knife, and weigh it down with a rock until it takes root (6-12 months, usually). This has the advantage of not hacking up the parent plant (keep your fingers crossed for me). Layering is the method I used to start 3 new snowball bushes (viburnum), so--as simple as it sounds--I know it works.

I am on the hunt for free plants for my new house. Other than a few evergreens, which I will have to buy, I don't intend to buy anything. Any and all suggestions will be appreciated! (especially if they are deer-proof).
but I've had stems re-root themselves below the plant so I get several new little plants.
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Joined: May 21st, 2006, 4:46 am

April 10th, 2012, 11:11 pm #4

nt
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