OT--Sad, but not surprising

OT--Sad, but not surprising

Joined: May 21st, 2006, 4:46 am

November 28th, 2011, 4:49 am #1

The picture on the cover of this week's Parade magazine was of a little boy whose parents both work minimum wage jobs and depend on a local food bank in Portland, Oregon, where I grew up. The name of the food pantry was familiar, so I looked it up on the internet. It is located in an elementary school about a mile and a half from where I grew up. It's in one of the shabbiest parts of town--some other formerly poor neighborhoods have gone upscale, but not this one. (My old neighborhood is now nicknamed Felony Flats). The article said 30% of Oregon's kids are now food insecure, and I'll bet that neighborhood has a MUCH higher percentage.

The article was soliciting help for Oregon food banks, and other worthy causes, but I believe charity begins at home...although that neighborhood USED to be my home. I have made monthly donations to the Harrison Food Bank this past year. It is located in the basement of the Baptist church and doesn't get any help from outside the community. I am going to continue doing this next year as well.
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Joined: June 5th, 2006, 5:33 pm

November 28th, 2011, 5:49 pm #2

I know stories like that are common, and do good too. But what bugs me is that while the food bank will get some money from people reading the story, that family will probably be targeted for specific donations. Here, they had a story on the local news about a family who was about to lose their home because the dad lost his job. Very nice home. Probably quarter million. Not only was the family flooded with money so they could continue to live there and keep up their lifestyle, the dad got several job offers too. But what about all the other people who are in the same situation? If they don't make the local news, they remain unnoticed and continue their downward spiral. And I'm sure there are a lot of people who are much more in need of funds than a family living in a 1/4 million dollar house on mom's smaller income.

------
The road to success is always under construction.
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Joined: October 28th, 2005, 10:05 am

November 28th, 2011, 7:08 pm #3

lol.... things are being cut left and right on both a federal funding and state level, so a lot of people (like me) who used to qualify for help, no longer do. I'm just tightening my belt, turning down the thermostat, putting off getting the glasses I need for as long as I can and just trying to get by on $60 a week. I feel bad for people who don't have skills- people who can't or won't cook from scratch.... I do think there should be classes for those who wish to take them to teach them to stretch a buck... shopping and cooking skills.

We are a spoiled people.... at all income levels, in this country tho... when you see people buying cases of soda with foodstamp benefits cards, it's sad..... and middle income level families who claim they can't get by spending less than $200+ a week for groceries... I have actually heard this from my kids friends moms.... I have a former SIL who spent $240 a week for her, her DH and one teen child living at home... can you imagine? Thats my monthly food budget for me plus a 10 year old and an almost 6 year old.
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Joined: September 24th, 2009, 3:01 pm

November 28th, 2011, 7:42 pm #4

till the money really truly isn't there - you think you can't. realizing the difference between can't and won't - it's a gutwrenching, rockbottom, tear your nuts off realization.

at least is was for me.

getting over kicking yourself for all the years you wasted precious dollars that would SO come in handy now..... even longer process.
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Joined: June 5th, 2006, 5:33 pm

November 29th, 2011, 1:25 am #5

I wish so much we had been saving since we first got married. I plan to start job hunting tomorrow. Bad timing I know. Not many places hire until after the first of the year.

------
The road to success is always under construction.
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Joined: May 21st, 2006, 4:46 am

November 29th, 2011, 3:13 am #6

Some places are still hiring. Try Macy's--and buy your gifts on sale with extra coupons AND the employee discount. Many years ago, when they first got out of the Peace Corps, my sister and her DH worked the Christmas season at the Emporium in San Francisco. They actually got hired for management, since they had college degrees. And they kept them all the way through inventory at the end of January, although they started laying off temps after work on Dec. 24.
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Joined: May 21st, 2006, 4:46 am

November 29th, 2011, 2:55 pm #7

The picture on the cover of this week's Parade magazine was of a little boy whose parents both work minimum wage jobs and depend on a local food bank in Portland, Oregon, where I grew up. The name of the food pantry was familiar, so I looked it up on the internet. It is located in an elementary school about a mile and a half from where I grew up. It's in one of the shabbiest parts of town--some other formerly poor neighborhoods have gone upscale, but not this one. (My old neighborhood is now nicknamed Felony Flats). The article said 30% of Oregon's kids are now food insecure, and I'll bet that neighborhood has a MUCH higher percentage.

The article was soliciting help for Oregon food banks, and other worthy causes, but I believe charity begins at home...although that neighborhood USED to be my home. I have made monthly donations to the Harrison Food Bank this past year. It is located in the basement of the Baptist church and doesn't get any help from outside the community. I am going to continue doing this next year as well.
There was a shooting this weekend at the convenience store on the corner from where I grew up. About 100 feet from my grade school. It was just a poor neighborhood at the edge of town when I lived there.
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