Has anyone see the documentary Bag it?

Has anyone see the documentary Bag it?

Joined: December 1st, 2006, 5:36 pm

April 25th, 2011, 3:07 pm #1

http://www.bagitmovie.com/index.html

I saw it on PBS last night. Very interesting. I have gotten sloppy on my conservation efforts and need to kick it back into gear.

One thing I plan on starting is at our work birthday parties, using my own metal fork and my own plate instead of the foam plates and plastic forks. I tried getting everyone to use reusable plates a few years ago, even bought them myself, but that went over like a lead balloon.

One lasy in the doc said she takes her glass jars to the grocery store and uses them for her bulk stuff (grains, etc). Do any of you have stores where you can do that? I assume you would have to weigh the jar before getting your stuff somehow. Otherwise, you'd be paying the wrong price for your stuff. She didn't say anything about that.

What do y'all do for produce? Some stuff I don't put in those flimsy bags, but soem I do, like loose stuff. I don't want the cashier sitting my grapes on the stand where the raw meat's been. I guess I can just save all the meat for last????

Any thoughts???
LisaCNC
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 24th, 2009, 3:01 pm

April 25th, 2011, 4:17 pm #2

"Bring reusable containers to restaurants to take home your leftovers."

I'm not sure how the health dept would feel about that. Though i guess they let me bring in my germ ridden children - so how much more harm is my (possibly not washed properly) tupperware (HA - also plastic) gonna do?

Yes my plastic bags end up in the landfill, but for that i use fewer hefty bags for my trash. and we are getting better about bringing fewer into the house in the first place.

One of our stores uses biodegradable bags, IF PROPERLY COMPOSTED.

Desani is about to start coming in plastic bottles made of plant material - which i'm sure will lead people to think it's biodegradable. from other bottles like this that i've seen - it's not, though it's just as recyclable as the other stuff, I haven't looked into the full enviro impact of the manufacturing process of plant plastic vs petroleum plastic.

One of our local supermarkets last year switched the egg cartons from styrofoam to the cardboard type. They had a big thing about it on their website - that the environmental impact of the manufacturing was almost the same - the styrofoam actually used less energy and less water to make by a fraction; but they went with the cardboard bc it will biodegrade if the customer composts it properly (it won't degrade faster than styrofoam in the landfill) and they went with that to put the decision into the consumer's hand.

my personal beleif is that, societally speaking, no one is really that interested in reducing waste or excess, unless there's money to be made by doing it.


Quote
Like
Share

Joined: December 1st, 2006, 5:36 pm

April 25th, 2011, 4:42 pm #3

There was a scene in the doc where he goes to a Wendy's drive thru and asks if they could put his food on a plate that he brought with him. The cashier said hold on and I assumed talked to the mgr. She came back on and said no because of cross contamination, they couldn't take anything inside the window. them he asked if they could put a beverage in his reusable bottle. They said no, same reason. Then when he got to the window and the cashier saw the camera, she said "You can't film here".

I agree that you can't give a restaurant your stuff from home for leftovers, but I see nothing wrong w/ haivng it w/ you at the table and putting the food in it at the table. I guess you could bring your own utensil rather than using one of theirs if you're really worried about it.

In the doc, he goes to some supermarket (either Whole Foods or the same type of place). He goes to the butcher counter to get some free range chicken, and they let him use his own container. He hands it to the employee who puts it on the scale to tare the weight and put the chicken in it. I don't know if there is anywhere around me that you cna do that. He lives in Telluride, CO, I believe (I know it's somewhere in CO).
LisaCNC
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: November 14th, 2005, 9:47 pm

April 25th, 2011, 4:45 pm #4

http://www.bagitmovie.com/index.html

I saw it on PBS last night. Very interesting. I have gotten sloppy on my conservation efforts and need to kick it back into gear.

One thing I plan on starting is at our work birthday parties, using my own metal fork and my own plate instead of the foam plates and plastic forks. I tried getting everyone to use reusable plates a few years ago, even bought them myself, but that went over like a lead balloon.

One lasy in the doc said she takes her glass jars to the grocery store and uses them for her bulk stuff (grains, etc). Do any of you have stores where you can do that? I assume you would have to weigh the jar before getting your stuff somehow. Otherwise, you'd be paying the wrong price for your stuff. She didn't say anything about that.

What do y'all do for produce? Some stuff I don't put in those flimsy bags, but soem I do, like loose stuff. I don't want the cashier sitting my grapes on the stand where the raw meat's been. I guess I can just save all the meat for last????

Any thoughts???
I frequent several natural food co-ops that encourage this. About 50% of the items sold are in bulk bins. You either bring your own container or buy theirs. The product is sold by weight, not volume, so what happens is you weigh your container without food in it and weigh it with food in it, and give both numbers to the cashier to charge you appropriately.

My co-ops have really great pricing on some things. Spices, in particular, are a rip-off in a conventional grocery store. I pay 25 - 50 cents for a spice that would cost $2.79 in the grocery store. Vinegars, nuts, honey, and oils are other things that can be bought less expensively using your own containers. Grains & pastas are less of a deal, although it's a nice way to buy them if you're after an unusual item (rye flour, for example) and you only need a cup rather than a five pound bag.
Last edited by DarcyMae on April 25th, 2011, 4:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: December 1st, 2006, 5:36 pm

April 25th, 2011, 4:54 pm #5

You weigh the empty container at the bins, and they just take your word for it? Or is their an employee that does that for you and give you an "official" weight?

Last time I was in Whole Foods (long time ago), I think you used plastic bags. Wonder if they have changed and let you do this? I know Fresh Market doesn't let you. Earth Fare is waaaay on the other side of town, so I never go there (it's like 15 miles from work one way, which would make it 40 miles from my house) and have no idea if they allow it or not.
LisaCNC
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 24th, 2009, 3:01 pm

April 25th, 2011, 6:39 pm #6

There was a scene in the doc where he goes to a Wendy's drive thru and asks if they could put his food on a plate that he brought with him. The cashier said hold on and I assumed talked to the mgr. She came back on and said no because of cross contamination, they couldn't take anything inside the window. them he asked if they could put a beverage in his reusable bottle. They said no, same reason. Then when he got to the window and the cashier saw the camera, she said "You can't film here".

I agree that you can't give a restaurant your stuff from home for leftovers, but I see nothing wrong w/ haivng it w/ you at the table and putting the food in it at the table. I guess you could bring your own utensil rather than using one of theirs if you're really worried about it.

In the doc, he goes to some supermarket (either Whole Foods or the same type of place). He goes to the butcher counter to get some free range chicken, and they let him use his own container. He hands it to the employee who puts it on the scale to tare the weight and put the chicken in it. I don't know if there is anywhere around me that you cna do that. He lives in Telluride, CO, I believe (I know it's somewhere in CO).
i worked at mcdonald's once in my life - and once it crossed the counter it can't come back. didn't use all your creamers? no i can't take them back we would take them from the customer but they had to go straight to the trash. forgot to put cheese on your burger? we had to give you a whole new burger, can't take your burger back and slap some cheese on it.

i could take the coffee pot out into the dining room and freshen up their coffee, but their cup could not come back across the counter to get re-filled and handed back.

When i worked at a supermarket deli - same thing - we could NOT take their container. nor did we have paper as an option for wrapping the meats and cheeses. currently only one of our supermarkets has paper, but you have to ask for it bc it costs the store more.

Last edited by stina716 on April 25th, 2011, 6:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: May 26th, 2006, 3:22 pm

April 25th, 2011, 8:05 pm #7

http://www.bagitmovie.com/index.html

I saw it on PBS last night. Very interesting. I have gotten sloppy on my conservation efforts and need to kick it back into gear.

One thing I plan on starting is at our work birthday parties, using my own metal fork and my own plate instead of the foam plates and plastic forks. I tried getting everyone to use reusable plates a few years ago, even bought them myself, but that went over like a lead balloon.

One lasy in the doc said she takes her glass jars to the grocery store and uses them for her bulk stuff (grains, etc). Do any of you have stores where you can do that? I assume you would have to weigh the jar before getting your stuff somehow. Otherwise, you'd be paying the wrong price for your stuff. She didn't say anything about that.

What do y'all do for produce? Some stuff I don't put in those flimsy bags, but soem I do, like loose stuff. I don't want the cashier sitting my grapes on the stand where the raw meat's been. I guess I can just save all the meat for last????

Any thoughts???
No, I haven't seen or heard of the documentary, but I'd really like to watch it. I wonder if PBS will be showing this again? I'll check my local listings.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: November 14th, 2005, 9:47 pm

April 25th, 2011, 8:10 pm #8

You weigh the empty container at the bins, and they just take your word for it? Or is their an employee that does that for you and give you an "official" weight?

Last time I was in Whole Foods (long time ago), I think you used plastic bags. Wonder if they have changed and let you do this? I know Fresh Market doesn't let you. Earth Fare is waaaay on the other side of town, so I never go there (it's like 15 miles from work one way, which would make it 40 miles from my house) and have no idea if they allow it or not.
I just reread my earlier post, and realized it was somewhat misleading. You DO give the cashier the weight of your containers. The cashier weighs the "product + container" weight at the register and deducts your "container only" weight at that point. So, the honor system applies for the container weight but not the total weight. I can't imagine that there's a lot of scamming going on. People that shop at natural food co-ops are a pretty honest bunch, and even if they weren't, an experienced cashier will know if someone's way out of bounds on something.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: May 28th, 2006, 3:48 am

April 25th, 2011, 10:00 pm #9

http://www.bagitmovie.com/index.html

I saw it on PBS last night. Very interesting. I have gotten sloppy on my conservation efforts and need to kick it back into gear.

One thing I plan on starting is at our work birthday parties, using my own metal fork and my own plate instead of the foam plates and plastic forks. I tried getting everyone to use reusable plates a few years ago, even bought them myself, but that went over like a lead balloon.

One lasy in the doc said she takes her glass jars to the grocery store and uses them for her bulk stuff (grains, etc). Do any of you have stores where you can do that? I assume you would have to weigh the jar before getting your stuff somehow. Otherwise, you'd be paying the wrong price for your stuff. She didn't say anything about that.

What do y'all do for produce? Some stuff I don't put in those flimsy bags, but soem I do, like loose stuff. I don't want the cashier sitting my grapes on the stand where the raw meat's been. I guess I can just save all the meat for last????

Any thoughts???
.
Last edited by SandyinMI on April 27th, 2011, 12:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: May 26th, 2006, 3:22 pm

April 26th, 2011, 1:33 am #10

This documentary is 12 minutes long, but the PBS one seems to be a different one. Correct?
Quote
Like
Share