A message to cat owners....

A message to cat owners....

Joined: November 14th, 2005, 9:47 pm

April 18th, 2012, 9:54 pm #1

I've had cats all my life, and never knew this information until recently. I'm posting it in hopes that it will save some of you both money and grief.

My cat has recently been diagnosed with diabetes. This means that I will have to inject him with insulin every 12 hours for the foreseeable future. It's possible that eventually we'll be able to wean down to one injection per day but that's a ways off. I love this cat and am willing to spend the time and the money (you do NOT want to know how expensive this cat has become!) However, I wish I'd known how to prevent this from the beginning.

I likely could have prevented my cat getting this disease by feeding him properly. Having now done rudimentary research on the internet and consulting with my vet, I've learned that cats should NOT eat dry cat food of any kind. Dry cat food is full of grains and carbohydrates. Cats are by nature carivores and need a high protein diet, which is best found in canned cat food. The cheapest canned food is a better diet for a cat than the priciest dry food (yes, that includes "prescription" dry food from the vet and high priced protein rich dry food). My cats are now eating canned Friskies. No more dry food.

Another reason to avoid dry food is that it's full of carbohydrates. As any low-carb eater knows, carbohydrates break down into sugar. Again, cats are carnivores. They don't need sugar in their diets. No wonder my poor kitty ended up with diabetes -- I've been shooting sugar into his system for the past seven years!

Finally, cats need water in their diet. Cats in the wild get lots of their water from the prey that they kill. Dry food obviously has none; canned is a much better option.

Here's the best written article I've found on the topic: http://catinfo.org/
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Joined: April 3rd, 2012, 12:32 am

April 19th, 2012, 1:44 am #2

Thanks for the info. Never heard that before but it makes sense. We just switched our cat to wet food but it's because her teeth are falling out and she was having a hard time eating the dry food anymore. I'd say, well I'll have the info for my next cat but I doubt they'll be a next cat.
Jaime
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Joined: October 29th, 2005, 6:29 pm

April 19th, 2012, 2:05 am #3

I've had cats all my life, and never knew this information until recently. I'm posting it in hopes that it will save some of you both money and grief.

My cat has recently been diagnosed with diabetes. This means that I will have to inject him with insulin every 12 hours for the foreseeable future. It's possible that eventually we'll be able to wean down to one injection per day but that's a ways off. I love this cat and am willing to spend the time and the money (you do NOT want to know how expensive this cat has become!) However, I wish I'd known how to prevent this from the beginning.

I likely could have prevented my cat getting this disease by feeding him properly. Having now done rudimentary research on the internet and consulting with my vet, I've learned that cats should NOT eat dry cat food of any kind. Dry cat food is full of grains and carbohydrates. Cats are by nature carivores and need a high protein diet, which is best found in canned cat food. The cheapest canned food is a better diet for a cat than the priciest dry food (yes, that includes "prescription" dry food from the vet and high priced protein rich dry food). My cats are now eating canned Friskies. No more dry food.

Another reason to avoid dry food is that it's full of carbohydrates. As any low-carb eater knows, carbohydrates break down into sugar. Again, cats are carnivores. They don't need sugar in their diets. No wonder my poor kitty ended up with diabetes -- I've been shooting sugar into his system for the past seven years!

Finally, cats need water in their diet. Cats in the wild get lots of their water from the prey that they kill. Dry food obviously has none; canned is a much better option.

Here's the best written article I've found on the topic: http://catinfo.org/
I know this, yet it is just not practical with as much as I travel. One of my cats has/had pancreatitis, which is likely caused by a dry food I used to give her (Nutro) that I thought was good. From what I've been told this has the potential to develop into diabetes as she gets older; if it does I will probably have to euthanize her. I can't expect to pass that burden off onto another person. She refuses to have anything to do with wet food. I used to have to give her pills once a day and the vet said just mix them in her wet food. Yeah right. I've tried them all, even the ones at more than $1 a can, and she tries to bury them. So she eats dry, and I have to hunt for stuff that fits what the vet told me - greater than 30% protein and less than 10-12% fat. That's harder than you think, when you also try to find cat food that doesn't have corn in the first five ingredients.

The other cat now, she likes and practically demands wet food at this point. So I give it to her, thinking the more of that she eats hopefully the less of the dry food she eats.

I also rub their teeth with toothpaste at least once a week, sometimes twice a week. Even that small amount seems to make a difference, as it's been about 5 years since the older cat had her teeth cleaned and the vet says they still look good. Not great mind you, but they don't need a scaling.
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Joined: November 14th, 2005, 9:47 pm

April 19th, 2012, 5:41 am #4

My diabetic cat will eat just about anything I put in front of him. I also have a 17 year old, finicky feline in the house who sometimes refuses the Friskies. On the days when he's refused to eat, I've had to accommodate him somewhat -- two things he will eat are dry Blue Wilderness food (40% protein -- get it at Petsmart) or Whiskas Purrfectly Fish wet food from pouches. He doesn't pull the "I don't like Friskies" routine too often, luckily.

Would your fussy eater eat the dry food if you mixed it with water? Just a sprinkle at first, then slowly increase the water, then eventually move to canned food? Just brainstorming here.

I'm going to try a Purina product called FortiFlora this weekend -- supposedly cats love the taste and will eat just about anything it's sprinkled on. We shall see. I REALLY want to only have to deal with having one kind of food in the house, once what I have on hand is gone.
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Joined: June 5th, 2006, 5:33 pm

April 20th, 2012, 3:11 am #5

I've had cats all my life, and never knew this information until recently. I'm posting it in hopes that it will save some of you both money and grief.

My cat has recently been diagnosed with diabetes. This means that I will have to inject him with insulin every 12 hours for the foreseeable future. It's possible that eventually we'll be able to wean down to one injection per day but that's a ways off. I love this cat and am willing to spend the time and the money (you do NOT want to know how expensive this cat has become!) However, I wish I'd known how to prevent this from the beginning.

I likely could have prevented my cat getting this disease by feeding him properly. Having now done rudimentary research on the internet and consulting with my vet, I've learned that cats should NOT eat dry cat food of any kind. Dry cat food is full of grains and carbohydrates. Cats are by nature carivores and need a high protein diet, which is best found in canned cat food. The cheapest canned food is a better diet for a cat than the priciest dry food (yes, that includes "prescription" dry food from the vet and high priced protein rich dry food). My cats are now eating canned Friskies. No more dry food.

Another reason to avoid dry food is that it's full of carbohydrates. As any low-carb eater knows, carbohydrates break down into sugar. Again, cats are carnivores. They don't need sugar in their diets. No wonder my poor kitty ended up with diabetes -- I've been shooting sugar into his system for the past seven years!

Finally, cats need water in their diet. Cats in the wild get lots of their water from the prey that they kill. Dry food obviously has none; canned is a much better option.

Here's the best written article I've found on the topic: http://catinfo.org/
But it makes sense. My cat used to love the canned food and now he seems to prefer the dry. Guess I'll wean him off the dry and only do the canned.

Have you noticed that PetSmart has a ton more varieties of Friskies than the grocery store?

------
The road to success is always under construction.
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Joined: May 24th, 2006, 2:57 am

April 20th, 2012, 2:23 pm #6

I've had cats all my life, and never knew this information until recently. I'm posting it in hopes that it will save some of you both money and grief.

My cat has recently been diagnosed with diabetes. This means that I will have to inject him with insulin every 12 hours for the foreseeable future. It's possible that eventually we'll be able to wean down to one injection per day but that's a ways off. I love this cat and am willing to spend the time and the money (you do NOT want to know how expensive this cat has become!) However, I wish I'd known how to prevent this from the beginning.

I likely could have prevented my cat getting this disease by feeding him properly. Having now done rudimentary research on the internet and consulting with my vet, I've learned that cats should NOT eat dry cat food of any kind. Dry cat food is full of grains and carbohydrates. Cats are by nature carivores and need a high protein diet, which is best found in canned cat food. The cheapest canned food is a better diet for a cat than the priciest dry food (yes, that includes "prescription" dry food from the vet and high priced protein rich dry food). My cats are now eating canned Friskies. No more dry food.

Another reason to avoid dry food is that it's full of carbohydrates. As any low-carb eater knows, carbohydrates break down into sugar. Again, cats are carnivores. They don't need sugar in their diets. No wonder my poor kitty ended up with diabetes -- I've been shooting sugar into his system for the past seven years!

Finally, cats need water in their diet. Cats in the wild get lots of their water from the prey that they kill. Dry food obviously has none; canned is a much better option.

Here's the best written article I've found on the topic: http://catinfo.org/
Thanks for sharing this!
How much are they supposed to be eating? I just leave my dry food out in a bowl, and refill as necessary. We have 2 cats.

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Joined: May 26th, 2006, 3:22 pm

April 20th, 2012, 2:41 pm #7

I've had cats all my life, and never knew this information until recently. I'm posting it in hopes that it will save some of you both money and grief.

My cat has recently been diagnosed with diabetes. This means that I will have to inject him with insulin every 12 hours for the foreseeable future. It's possible that eventually we'll be able to wean down to one injection per day but that's a ways off. I love this cat and am willing to spend the time and the money (you do NOT want to know how expensive this cat has become!) However, I wish I'd known how to prevent this from the beginning.

I likely could have prevented my cat getting this disease by feeding him properly. Having now done rudimentary research on the internet and consulting with my vet, I've learned that cats should NOT eat dry cat food of any kind. Dry cat food is full of grains and carbohydrates. Cats are by nature carivores and need a high protein diet, which is best found in canned cat food. The cheapest canned food is a better diet for a cat than the priciest dry food (yes, that includes "prescription" dry food from the vet and high priced protein rich dry food). My cats are now eating canned Friskies. No more dry food.

Another reason to avoid dry food is that it's full of carbohydrates. As any low-carb eater knows, carbohydrates break down into sugar. Again, cats are carnivores. They don't need sugar in their diets. No wonder my poor kitty ended up with diabetes -- I've been shooting sugar into his system for the past seven years!

Finally, cats need water in their diet. Cats in the wild get lots of their water from the prey that they kill. Dry food obviously has none; canned is a much better option.

Here's the best written article I've found on the topic: http://catinfo.org/
Our first cat developed acute monocytic leukemia, and the last cat had thyroid issues (took daily meds) and arthritis. They were both fed dry food because it was easier and less smelly, but I'd never heard this information. We're now down to the outdoor cat that we inherited from neighbors who moved. I bought Sassy some Friskies canned (i.e. in a small plastic tub that is recyclable in our community) food yesterday, and she loved it.
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Joined: November 14th, 2005, 9:47 pm

April 20th, 2012, 10:23 pm #8

Thanks for sharing this!
How much are they supposed to be eating? I just leave my dry food out in a bowl, and refill as necessary. We have 2 cats.
My vet calculated out the calorie needs for my cats based on their age, weight & activity levels. Since I have a young, heavy kitty and an old, skinny one I'm feeding both the higher calorie needs of the younger one. The older one is too skinny, anyway. Bet you could find the information for your cat(s) on the internet somewhere though.

Was reading more on this topic earlier today, and saw a veterinarian refer to dry food as "diabetes in a bag". Sigh. Wish I'd known years ago. It just kills me that I've never had a vet tell me this information. They told me to get the cat to lose some weight, which I tried to do with "light" dry cat food. That's a little like telling a low carb eater to lose weight by only eating low carb pasta.....not gonna happen.

Miranda, yes the canned food is smellier.....I'm learning to adjust. The smell is preferable to the alternative though!
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Joined: May 21st, 2006, 5:50 pm

April 21st, 2012, 12:54 am #9

I've had cats all my life, and never knew this information until recently. I'm posting it in hopes that it will save some of you both money and grief.

My cat has recently been diagnosed with diabetes. This means that I will have to inject him with insulin every 12 hours for the foreseeable future. It's possible that eventually we'll be able to wean down to one injection per day but that's a ways off. I love this cat and am willing to spend the time and the money (you do NOT want to know how expensive this cat has become!) However, I wish I'd known how to prevent this from the beginning.

I likely could have prevented my cat getting this disease by feeding him properly. Having now done rudimentary research on the internet and consulting with my vet, I've learned that cats should NOT eat dry cat food of any kind. Dry cat food is full of grains and carbohydrates. Cats are by nature carivores and need a high protein diet, which is best found in canned cat food. The cheapest canned food is a better diet for a cat than the priciest dry food (yes, that includes "prescription" dry food from the vet and high priced protein rich dry food). My cats are now eating canned Friskies. No more dry food.

Another reason to avoid dry food is that it's full of carbohydrates. As any low-carb eater knows, carbohydrates break down into sugar. Again, cats are carnivores. They don't need sugar in their diets. No wonder my poor kitty ended up with diabetes -- I've been shooting sugar into his system for the past seven years!

Finally, cats need water in their diet. Cats in the wild get lots of their water from the prey that they kill. Dry food obviously has none; canned is a much better option.

Here's the best written article I've found on the topic: http://catinfo.org/
if it were true then all cats that eat dry food would be diabetic. Sounds like a ploy to sell more canned vet food. Just my opinion.
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Joined: June 5th, 2006, 5:33 pm

April 21st, 2012, 5:30 am #10

"dry cat food unhealthy" and found a lot of websites that said the same thing. There were at least two that said there are some dry foods that aren't high in carbs.

I told dh about this conversation and he was skeptical. Of course, he thinks if our cat could live for years on whatever it was scrounging from neighborhood trash cans, dry cat food has got to be a step up. But I've always wondered if the dog food and chemicals is the reason our last two dogs died of cancer, and a couple of other neighbor dogs died of cancer too.

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The road to success is always under construction.
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