If you remember these.....

If you remember these.....

Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 9th, 2010, 1:57 pm #1

YOU ARE TOO OLD!

You'd reach into a muddy gutter for a penny?

It took three minutes for the TV to warm up?

When a quarter was a decent allowance?

Nobody owned a purebred dog?

Your Mom wore nylons that came in two pieces?

You got your windshield cleaned, oil checked, and gas pumped, without asking, all for free, every time? And you didn't pay for air? And, you got trading stamps to boot?

Laundry detergent had free glasses, dishes or towels hidden inside the box?

It was considered a great privilege to be taken out to dinner at a real restaurant with your parents?

They threatened to keep kids back a grade if they failed. . and they did it!

A '57 Chevy was everyone's dream car.

Watching the submarine races with your girl?

No one ever asked where the car keys were because they were always in the car, in the ignition, and the doors were never locked?

Lying on your back in the grass with your friends and saying 'That cloud looks like a... '

Playing baseball with no adults to help kids with the rules of the game?

Stuff from the store came without safety caps and hermetic seals because no one had yet tried to poison a perfect stranger?

And with all our progress, don't you just wish, just once, you could slip back in time and savor the slower pace, and share it with the children of today.

When being sent to the principal's office was nothing compared to the fate that awaited the student at home?

Basically we were in fear for our lives, but it wasn't because of drive-by shootings, drugs, gangs, etc.

Summers were filled with bike rides, Hula Hoops, and visits to the pool, and eating Kool-Aid powder with sugar.

Howdy Doody and The Peanut Gallery, the Lone Ranger, The Shadow knows, Nellie Bell , Roy and Dale, Trigger and Buttermilk.

Candy cigarettes, Wax Coke-shaped bottles with colored sugar water inside.

Soda pop machines that dispensed glass bottles.

Coffee shops with Table Side Jukeboxes.

Blackjack, Clove and Teaberry chewing gum.

Home milk delivery in glass bottles with cardboard stoppers.

Newsreels before the movie. War was a card game?

Telephone numbers with a word prefix...( Yukon 2-601). Party lines.

Peashooters, Howdy Doody, Hi-Fi's, 78 RPM records!

Green Stamps, Mimeograph paper, The Fort Apache Play Set.

Catching The Fireflies on a summer evening.

It wasn't odd to have two or three 'Best Friends'?

Having a Weapon in School meant being caught with a Slingshot?

Saturday morning cartoons weren't 30-minute commercials for action figures?

'Oly-oly-oxen-free' made perfect sense?

Spinning around, getting dizzy, and falling down was cause for giggles?

The Worst Embarrassment was being picked last for a team?

Baseball cards in the spokes transformed any bike into a motorcycle?

Taking drugs meant orange - flavored chewable aspirin?

Water balloons were the ultimate weapon?

If you can remember most or all of these, Then You Have Lived!!!!!!!

(PS... Make sure your will is in order)
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Joined: May 9th, 2005, 12:05 pm

April 9th, 2010, 3:58 pm #2

Lord, where to begin!

I would still reach into the gutter for a penny, only I'd never see it.

Don't watch TV. Too many channels and not enough variety. Remember variety shows and shows that had music? Whatever happen to Dinah Shore?

Remember TV summer replacement programs?

I knew people who had (more or less) purebred dogs but I also remember that some dogs had the run of the neighborhood. Other were kept penned up.

The 57 Chevy may have been a dream car (we even had one, a 4 door SW) but that was only if you'd never seen a T-Bird. But we sure locked the car doors and the car was in a locked garage. It was only driven a couple days a week.

I never looked at the clouds and didn't like ball games.

We were never in fear for our lives, usually. Policemen wore white shirts and had revolvers in swivel holsters.

Yes, summers were filled with bike rides, camping trips, going to the pool, sunburns, lots of things with sugar and activities with friends that can't be mentioned here. Hula hoops didn't hold our attention very long but everyone had one.

Corner stores before there were Seven-Elevens, A&P stores with the strong smell of coffee, door-to-door peddlers selling produce off the back of their truck.

Having your garden plowed by a man with a horse.

Home delivered milk freezing on a cold morning and pushing the paper stopper up.

Watching Howdy Doody, Rod Brown of the Rocket Rangers and Shari Lewis at a friend's house because you were the last to get a TV.

Locally produced TV shows hosted by a costumed character; later there were locally produced late night shows with a costumed host that showed moster movies.

Play sets of a farm set or an army base set. The farm set always came with birds that perched on the fence; the army set came with trash cans.

Walking to school; walking home for lunch.

Showers after gym in school.

Watching the Christmas parade; small towns were perfect for parades.

The Sears Christmas catalog.

Blue jeans that only came one way: new and unwashed, unfaded, unrinsed and with extra long legs that you turned up about four inches. You grew into them.

Getting a blister every time you got a new pair of shoes; you only got the old pair resoled once.

School plays and wearing a crepe paper costume.

I could go on. I'd hate to live it over again, however, except for a day here and there.
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Joined: May 9th, 2005, 12:05 pm

April 9th, 2010, 4:41 pm #3

YOU ARE TOO OLD!

You'd reach into a muddy gutter for a penny?

It took three minutes for the TV to warm up?

When a quarter was a decent allowance?

Nobody owned a purebred dog?

Your Mom wore nylons that came in two pieces?

You got your windshield cleaned, oil checked, and gas pumped, without asking, all for free, every time? And you didn't pay for air? And, you got trading stamps to boot?

Laundry detergent had free glasses, dishes or towels hidden inside the box?

It was considered a great privilege to be taken out to dinner at a real restaurant with your parents?

They threatened to keep kids back a grade if they failed. . and they did it!

A '57 Chevy was everyone's dream car.

Watching the submarine races with your girl?

No one ever asked where the car keys were because they were always in the car, in the ignition, and the doors were never locked?

Lying on your back in the grass with your friends and saying 'That cloud looks like a... '

Playing baseball with no adults to help kids with the rules of the game?

Stuff from the store came without safety caps and hermetic seals because no one had yet tried to poison a perfect stranger?

And with all our progress, don't you just wish, just once, you could slip back in time and savor the slower pace, and share it with the children of today.

When being sent to the principal's office was nothing compared to the fate that awaited the student at home?

Basically we were in fear for our lives, but it wasn't because of drive-by shootings, drugs, gangs, etc.

Summers were filled with bike rides, Hula Hoops, and visits to the pool, and eating Kool-Aid powder with sugar.

Howdy Doody and The Peanut Gallery, the Lone Ranger, The Shadow knows, Nellie Bell , Roy and Dale, Trigger and Buttermilk.

Candy cigarettes, Wax Coke-shaped bottles with colored sugar water inside.

Soda pop machines that dispensed glass bottles.

Coffee shops with Table Side Jukeboxes.

Blackjack, Clove and Teaberry chewing gum.

Home milk delivery in glass bottles with cardboard stoppers.

Newsreels before the movie. War was a card game?

Telephone numbers with a word prefix...( Yukon 2-601). Party lines.

Peashooters, Howdy Doody, Hi-Fi's, 78 RPM records!

Green Stamps, Mimeograph paper, The Fort Apache Play Set.

Catching The Fireflies on a summer evening.

It wasn't odd to have two or three 'Best Friends'?

Having a Weapon in School meant being caught with a Slingshot?

Saturday morning cartoons weren't 30-minute commercials for action figures?

'Oly-oly-oxen-free' made perfect sense?

Spinning around, getting dizzy, and falling down was cause for giggles?

The Worst Embarrassment was being picked last for a team?

Baseball cards in the spokes transformed any bike into a motorcycle?

Taking drugs meant orange - flavored chewable aspirin?

Water balloons were the ultimate weapon?

If you can remember most or all of these, Then You Have Lived!!!!!!!

(PS... Make sure your will is in order)
That was so much fun, I've thought of a few more. Here they are from about a 20-year period, in no particular order:

Bacon & eggs every day for breakfast.

Drive-in movies. Don't drive off with the speaker still in your car window.

Drive-in restaurants where a car-hop took your order, brought it out on a tray that hooked on the car door.

Signs that said "white only." Asking what that meant.

Stop lights that didn't have a yellow light, only red & green.

"Beach" movies with Annette Funicello.

Crew cuts, flat tops and ducktails.

Wool swim suits.

Bleeding Madras.

Pegged pants.

Cut-off blue jean shorts, sometimes worn indecently tight and short.

Semi-transparent pastel-colored nylon sport shirts. Horrid!

Hip-huggers, the first time around. Stretchy body shirts.

Sweat shirts and t-shirts that were plain and had no printing or pictures.

Column mounted gear shift levers.

Hand signals when driving.

Having a crush on a school teacher.

Dressing up for parties; dress up days at school; dressing up for dates; dates!

Hitchhiking.

When parents wanted vaccines for their kids for polio, etc.

Coat hanger drives.

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Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 10th, 2010, 5:33 am #4

Yes, it's amazing how much has come and gone just in our lifetimes. The pace of change is so fast these days- its plumb hard to keep up. I'm always replacing equipment at work- not because its old or wore out- indeed much of it is relatively new but even so its already technologically obsolete. Frankly I wish things would slow down so my 64 year old brain can half keep up.
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Bob
Bob

April 10th, 2010, 2:50 pm #5

YOU ARE TOO OLD!

You'd reach into a muddy gutter for a penny?

It took three minutes for the TV to warm up?

When a quarter was a decent allowance?

Nobody owned a purebred dog?

Your Mom wore nylons that came in two pieces?

You got your windshield cleaned, oil checked, and gas pumped, without asking, all for free, every time? And you didn't pay for air? And, you got trading stamps to boot?

Laundry detergent had free glasses, dishes or towels hidden inside the box?

It was considered a great privilege to be taken out to dinner at a real restaurant with your parents?

They threatened to keep kids back a grade if they failed. . and they did it!

A '57 Chevy was everyone's dream car.

Watching the submarine races with your girl?

No one ever asked where the car keys were because they were always in the car, in the ignition, and the doors were never locked?

Lying on your back in the grass with your friends and saying 'That cloud looks like a... '

Playing baseball with no adults to help kids with the rules of the game?

Stuff from the store came without safety caps and hermetic seals because no one had yet tried to poison a perfect stranger?

And with all our progress, don't you just wish, just once, you could slip back in time and savor the slower pace, and share it with the children of today.

When being sent to the principal's office was nothing compared to the fate that awaited the student at home?

Basically we were in fear for our lives, but it wasn't because of drive-by shootings, drugs, gangs, etc.

Summers were filled with bike rides, Hula Hoops, and visits to the pool, and eating Kool-Aid powder with sugar.

Howdy Doody and The Peanut Gallery, the Lone Ranger, The Shadow knows, Nellie Bell , Roy and Dale, Trigger and Buttermilk.

Candy cigarettes, Wax Coke-shaped bottles with colored sugar water inside.

Soda pop machines that dispensed glass bottles.

Coffee shops with Table Side Jukeboxes.

Blackjack, Clove and Teaberry chewing gum.

Home milk delivery in glass bottles with cardboard stoppers.

Newsreels before the movie. War was a card game?

Telephone numbers with a word prefix...( Yukon 2-601). Party lines.

Peashooters, Howdy Doody, Hi-Fi's, 78 RPM records!

Green Stamps, Mimeograph paper, The Fort Apache Play Set.

Catching The Fireflies on a summer evening.

It wasn't odd to have two or three 'Best Friends'?

Having a Weapon in School meant being caught with a Slingshot?

Saturday morning cartoons weren't 30-minute commercials for action figures?

'Oly-oly-oxen-free' made perfect sense?

Spinning around, getting dizzy, and falling down was cause for giggles?

The Worst Embarrassment was being picked last for a team?

Baseball cards in the spokes transformed any bike into a motorcycle?

Taking drugs meant orange - flavored chewable aspirin?

Water balloons were the ultimate weapon?

If you can remember most or all of these, Then You Have Lived!!!!!!!

(PS... Make sure your will is in order)
Most of them anyway:

It took three minutes for the TV to warm up? --- now that you mention, it DID take a while. I had forgotten that. I have told my sons: Imagine a time when there were only a few channels (broadcast) to watch on TV, there were no DVD (or VCR) movies, and you either watched the old movies your parents watched on TV (boring!) or went with friends to a cinema or drive-in movie theater (which was fun and a treat). And no video games, and no computers/internet. My sons thought I had lived a hellish life!

You got your windshield cleaned, oil checked, and gas pumped, without asking, all for free, every time? And you didn't pay for air? And, you got trading stamps to boot?

--- I was a station attendant in the 70s and did all that. I still have guys come up to me as I wash my own windshield and say You worked at a gas station, didnt you?, as that was how we were all taught to do it. Those were the days when I could stand on concrete for most of my 9 hour shift and still walk the better part of a mile home (my knees ache just thinking about it now!)

Laundry detergent had free glasses, dishes or towels hidden inside the box? --- not glasses, tumblers

It was considered a great privilege to be taken out to dinner at a real restaurant with your parents? --- it was also a treat for us to get take-out food, such as pizza (no delivery, you had to go get it), or soda. My kids thought nothing of any of that . . even turned down my offers: Im sick of pizza!

When being sent to the principal's office was nothing compared to the fate that awaited the student at home? Basically we were in fear for our lives, but it wasn't because of drive-by shootings, drugs, gangs, etc. ----- Yeah, boy . . I feared my father!

Home milk delivery in glass bottles with cardboard stoppers. ----- I think that was a bit before my time, as was party-line phones. I remember glass milk jugs with plaster handles/caps from a place called Lawson's, and you took the bottles back to the store for deposit.

Catching The Fireflies on a summer evening. --- and seeing who had captured the most in their jar at the end.

Blue jeans that only came one way: new and unwashed, unfaded, unrinsed and with extra long legs that you turned up about four inches. You grew into them. ---- I definitely remember old Levi jeans, so starched and stiff that I hated to break in new ones. It took me the better part of a year before they were as faded and soft as I liked them. I remember my sisters washing their new jeans in the bathtub, trying to get some of the bluing out and soften/fade them. But those jeans were durable! Youd outgrow them -- hand them down -- before youd wear them out. I wish we had jeans like that today (just without being stiff like cardboard when new and making me sweat in them). People tell me the quality of denim back then would make Levi's cost $100 today.

Bacon & eggs every day for breakfast.

----- I remember having a newspaper route when I was about 11-13 years old. I had 70-some customers, and the newspapers filled each basket on my bike, and then the rest had to be strapped in a tall stack behind the seat. I delivered the morning addition, so I was up at 4:30 each morning to pack my bike and deliver the papers, with just enough time to get home and clean up before heading to school. Most days I delivered on my bike, but there were some cold days with heavy snow and/or ice when my Mom would take me around in her car (I didnt want to impose, but I was also grateful). I remember how spooky the dark neighborhoods seemed then (and this was a time when you felt safe walking streets). Every Friday afternoon, I would go around collecting the weekly fees. After paying for the papers, I had about $5 weekly net profit. But, I felt like a self-sufficient man with that five dollars I would earn for 6 days work. On Saturday morning, after delivering my route, I would head to this old diner in town. This place had been there since it was part of the stagecoach route (was called Stagecoach Inn) and they had the best food. Id order fried eggs with bacon, toast and jam and sit there relishing my reward, paid with my own earned money. Not that my mother didnt cook, but this just felt so grown-up and satisfying.

Yeah, I definitely remember that.
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Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 11th, 2010, 2:34 pm #6

Yes, radios and TVs use to have tubes that had to warm up before the set would operate. But they were pretty, I found those little glowing bottles fascinating when I was a kid which probably set me towards a career in electronics. But tubes are gone now- replaced by little boring chips and transistors. But while they are much more efficient and reliable they are just nothing to look at.

As for the other things on the list (which I didn't write by the way- it's one of those things my cousin in Pittsburgh is always sending me- I miss some- and some I'm glad are gone. It's a pity I can't pick and choose what I want and don't. But the older I get the more difficult I find it to keep pace with the ever-increasing change.
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Bob
Bob

April 11th, 2010, 3:51 pm #7

I remember that when our old B & W set was having problems, we would open the case, pull all the electronic tubes out of the chassis (marking which went where) and go down to a store that had a tube testing machine (some tubes obviously had a problem -- you could see burn marks in it, or it was supposed to have a little orange light but didn't). I'd read the letters/numbers printed on the side of the tubes, set a switch or two as directed on the machine, look for the appropriate sockets to plug them into (some also had a wire to connect to a metal post on top of the tube) and the machine would tell if the tube was OK or not. Then, you just bought the defective tube(s), go home and plug them all back into the set. And it worked! I thought it was cool to be able to do this.

I wish I could do this now. I have this 8 year old 32" JVC tube set that stopped working -- when I plug it in and push the power button, the timer light starts flashing and the set does nothing. My hunch is that it could easily be fixed, but I can't just pull tubes out to check them. Probably would pay someone $100 just to come out to check it, then the cost of part(s) and labor for the fix. I'm afraid that I could spend half or more in repair that I would spend just going out to buy a flat panel set. I have been looking at flat panels, but between being cheap and not wanting to toss out a salvageable set, I haven't done anything about it yet. (I paid $699 in 2002 for the JVC, and I've been looking at 40" LCD's for about $500).
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Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 12th, 2010, 3:01 am #8

I suspect the "burn marks" you saw was where the "getter" was flashed during manufacturing process to remove residual oxygen. Most tubes had that to varying degrees. Yes you could usually fix sets by replacing tubes (and often cause good tubes to go bad from the jostling). My first job- at 15- was in a TV repair shop. We always resented the "tube-pullers". They only brought us only the "dogs"- set with bad resistors, capacitors, diodes, etc that were time consuming to track down and replace.

In those days there was a TV repair shop on practically every corner- now there are hardly any- first because new sets don't break down as much- and when they do they are so difficult and expensive to repair that it's usually makes more sense to get a new one. This is true of almost all consumer electronics now- it's not designed to be repaired. You take your cell phone in for repair and if it's anything more than a battery the guy will just toss it a bin and give you another. Even at the station where stuff is too expensive to toss- our once busy repair bench sits idle now because today's equipment requires so much specialized tools and parts to fix that only the factory can do it. So signal paths are designed in parallel so equipment that is off for repair can be bypassed.

But as much as I'm nostalgic about the "old days" I must admit you get a lot better TV today for a lot less money. But the same automated manufacturing processes that makes them cheap to manufacture make them almost impossible to repair when they do break.

By the way I still have a TV that has tubes in it! I bought in 1971! It's in a guest bedroom and is never used now but it still works! I've often wondered if I might win some contest for having the oldest still functional TV around!
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Joined: September 2nd, 2007, 4:20 pm

April 12th, 2010, 5:39 am #9

Yes, radios and TVs use to have tubes that had to warm up before the set would operate. But they were pretty, I found those little glowing bottles fascinating when I was a kid which probably set me towards a career in electronics. But tubes are gone now- replaced by little boring chips and transistors. But while they are much more efficient and reliable they are just nothing to look at.

As for the other things on the list (which I didn't write by the way- it's one of those things my cousin in Pittsburgh is always sending me- I miss some- and some I'm glad are gone. It's a pity I can't pick and choose what I want and don't. But the older I get the more difficult I find it to keep pace with the ever-increasing change.
Was at an electronics store the other day, and saw that they had stereos with tubes. It appears that people realize that tubes have higher fidelity (clarity) then the chip counter-parts do. These tube stereos also were more than twice the price of the chip stereos. I also imagine that someone would have a hard time finding a replacement tube if one goes out.
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Joined: September 2nd, 2007, 4:20 pm

April 12th, 2010, 6:36 am #10

That was so much fun, I've thought of a few more. Here they are from about a 20-year period, in no particular order:

Bacon & eggs every day for breakfast.

Drive-in movies. Don't drive off with the speaker still in your car window.

Drive-in restaurants where a car-hop took your order, brought it out on a tray that hooked on the car door.

Signs that said "white only." Asking what that meant.

Stop lights that didn't have a yellow light, only red & green.

"Beach" movies with Annette Funicello.

Crew cuts, flat tops and ducktails.

Wool swim suits.

Bleeding Madras.

Pegged pants.

Cut-off blue jean shorts, sometimes worn indecently tight and short.

Semi-transparent pastel-colored nylon sport shirts. Horrid!

Hip-huggers, the first time around. Stretchy body shirts.

Sweat shirts and t-shirts that were plain and had no printing or pictures.

Column mounted gear shift levers.

Hand signals when driving.

Having a crush on a school teacher.

Dressing up for parties; dress up days at school; dressing up for dates; dates!

Hitchhiking.

When parents wanted vaccines for their kids for polio, etc.

Coat hanger drives.
How about when the teacher would show slides from a projector while reading from a booklet. If you were real lucky, the teacher would bring in a film projector and show a film.

A small calculator was about the size of VCR tape, and the teacher would NOT allow you to have one in class. I was just thankful that I did not have to learn how to use a slide rule.

A spell checker was called a dictionary.

How about the old ditto machines and the carbon paper.

If you wanted to see a Disney cartoon, you either had to wait for Sunday evening or for the Disney movie to come to the dollar theater. There was no VCR or DVD.

The evening news on TV was the primary news source. You did not have to log on to the internet for the " rest of the story ". Nor was the news repeated every 15 minutes, making people impervious to the major events.
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