Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 14th, 2010, 4:24 am #21

Yes, we people born after WW-II have no concept of what it was like living in those war years when there were shortages of everything. There has never been anything like it since. When I got into the broadcasting business I loved hearing the older timers talk about this era and the tricks they had to do to keep their stations on the air when you couldn't get parts. Certain large stations that were considered essential for the war effort could get anything they wanted direct from the government but all the others had a tough go of it. Many operated at reduce power to save tubes and some just went off completely.

You know, when I see the incompetence of our government now- and going back 40 years- I find it amazing how quickly and completely our government and manufacturing industries were able to completely restructure our society for fighting a world war in a matter of weeks. I don't think we could do that today. It's been nearly ten years since the World Trade center was destroyed and people are still arguing about what to build to replace it! We need another 1940s generation to get this country straighten out on track again!
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Bob
Bob

April 14th, 2010, 12:55 pm #22

I too marvel at the generation that grew up during the Great Depression and then fought and won WWII. To call it "The Greatest Generation" is very appropriate. I noted previously that I continued to attend reunions of my father's Navy shipmates even after Dad's death, because they and their wives are such wonderful people. I think the times mold people. I think having to endure such hardships while young, and then having to fight the noblest and bloodiest of wars . . and returning as the conquering heroes . . . all before most of them had turned 30, gave them a certain mettle. I think it would have been an awesome time to have been an American -- certainly my parents thought so.

They told me about rationing -- how people saved the tin foil that chewing gum was wrapped in, how people saved rubber bands into a ball, and then turned them in for recycling, how gasoline was rationed. They also told me that everyone they knew was glad to "do their part" for the war effort and to "support our boys". That generation really believed in their President and govt. I agree with you -- we are a very different country today and would have a harder time tolerating deprivation of conveniences and believing pols' admonishments that sacrifices are needed and assurances that resources would be utilized in the right ways (more likely, we would think our sacrifices were going to line the pockets of the rich and powerful!).
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COOL BEANS BOI
COOL BEANS BOI

April 14th, 2010, 2:10 pm #23

Yes, we people born after WW-II have no concept of what it was like living in those war years when there were shortages of everything. There has never been anything like it since. When I got into the broadcasting business I loved hearing the older timers talk about this era and the tricks they had to do to keep their stations on the air when you couldn't get parts. Certain large stations that were considered essential for the war effort could get anything they wanted direct from the government but all the others had a tough go of it. Many operated at reduce power to save tubes and some just went off completely.

You know, when I see the incompetence of our government now- and going back 40 years- I find it amazing how quickly and completely our government and manufacturing industries were able to completely restructure our society for fighting a world war in a matter of weeks. I don't think we could do that today. It's been nearly ten years since the World Trade center was destroyed and people are still arguing about what to build to replace it! We need another 1940s generation to get this country straighten out on track again!
Boy Nat, you are right about that! If the Empire State Bldg was knocked down in 1945, it would have been re-built totally by 1946.
Speaking of radio stations deemed essential. Did WLW in Cincy ever really go up to 500,000 watts? I hear they were licensed to do it, but they never really did it.

Also, my grandad tells me that tires were not being sold during the war so the national speed limit was 35! Imagine that today!!
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Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 14th, 2010, 3:47 pm #24

Yes in deed, WLW ran 500-KW throughout the war years. The government considered the large stations in each market so essential for providing providing civil defense information to the public that they had guards stationed at them in case anyone tried to sabotage them. Even the one I worked at in Raleigh had guards during WW-II. When I started working there in 1971 they showed me the foundation where the guard tower had been. There were also photos of it and the big flood lights they had put up during the war.
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Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 14th, 2010, 3:52 pm #25

Yes, we people born after WW-II have no concept of what it was like living in those war years when there were shortages of everything. There has never been anything like it since. When I got into the broadcasting business I loved hearing the older timers talk about this era and the tricks they had to do to keep their stations on the air when you couldn't get parts. Certain large stations that were considered essential for the war effort could get anything they wanted direct from the government but all the others had a tough go of it. Many operated at reduce power to save tubes and some just went off completely.

You know, when I see the incompetence of our government now- and going back 40 years- I find it amazing how quickly and completely our government and manufacturing industries were able to completely restructure our society for fighting a world war in a matter of weeks. I don't think we could do that today. It's been nearly ten years since the World Trade center was destroyed and people are still arguing about what to build to replace it! We need another 1940s generation to get this country straighten out on track again!
And even after the war- that '40s generation came home and build our interstate highway system and our ICBM defense system in the 1950s and then our space program that landed us on the moon in the 1960s.

Then we babyboomers took over- and it's been all downhill since! We can't even keep our worn-out space shuttles flying- soon they will be retired and we will have to depend on the Russians to take our men to the space station. How humiliating!
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Joined: May 9th, 2005, 12:05 pm

May 4th, 2010, 3:39 pm #26

Yes, we people born after WW-II have no concept of what it was like living in those war years when there were shortages of everything. There has never been anything like it since. When I got into the broadcasting business I loved hearing the older timers talk about this era and the tricks they had to do to keep their stations on the air when you couldn't get parts. Certain large stations that were considered essential for the war effort could get anything they wanted direct from the government but all the others had a tough go of it. Many operated at reduce power to save tubes and some just went off completely.

You know, when I see the incompetence of our government now- and going back 40 years- I find it amazing how quickly and completely our government and manufacturing industries were able to completely restructure our society for fighting a world war in a matter of weeks. I don't think we could do that today. It's been nearly ten years since the World Trade center was destroyed and people are still arguing about what to build to replace it! We need another 1940s generation to get this country straighten out on track again!
You know, the World Trade Center didn't belong to the government. It was privately owned. The Pentagon, on the other hand, is. It was rebuilt with hardly a thought.

An airplane actually did fly into the Empire State Building once but the building didn't fall down.
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Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 4th, 2010, 6:16 pm #27

Actually the World Trade Center was own by a government agency- the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.

And yes, the Empire State building was hit by a plane- a low speed two engine propeller plane- quite a difference than fuel laden high speed jetliners. Actually I think the WTC withstood the initial impact amazing well. It was the prolong cooking of the steel with burning jet fuel that eventually lead to it's failure. No practical office building could survive that.
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