Cost of fuel

Cost of fuel

UK Eric
UK Eric

May 2nd, 2006, 8:18 pm #1

Somewhere I noticed a comment about the cost of gas/petrol in US. You might be interested to know how much we pay here in the UK. I did a quick conversion and we are having to pay about US$ 6.80 per US gallon (about 98 pence per litre) for standard unleaded. Of course, most of that goes to our government in tax. This same government is now working out how it can also charge us per mile for the use of the roads. Like we don't pay enough already. How is it on your side of the pond?
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Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 2nd, 2006, 10:15 pm #2

Currently we are paying about 3 dollars a gallon. It varies some from place to place but its about 50 cents higher than this time last year. And yes, it is frequently pointed out that just about everyone in the world pays more for petro than we Americans do. But that doesn't make it any easier for most Americans because we drive bigger vehicles and more miles than Europeans so we use a lot more gas. I think this is going to have to stop though because the days of cheap gas are gone forever and we are going to have to get use to being more frugal- driving less, and in smaller cars like they do in Europe. Most Americans drive vehicles that are far bigger than they really need. Very few of the people who drive around in 2-ton SUVs really need such things. They are mostly status symbols.
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SHADOW
SHADOW

May 2nd, 2006, 10:19 pm #3

Somewhere I noticed a comment about the cost of gas/petrol in US. You might be interested to know how much we pay here in the UK. I did a quick conversion and we are having to pay about US$ 6.80 per US gallon (about 98 pence per litre) for standard unleaded. Of course, most of that goes to our government in tax. This same government is now working out how it can also charge us per mile for the use of the roads. Like we don't pay enough already. How is it on your side of the pond?
I knew y'all were paying a lot more than we do, but I didn't know how much lately. That is terrible! We are currently at $2.89 for regular unleaded here in Texas.

Now that per mile charge...that sounds like double dipping if I ever heard it. You are already paying a tax for when you buy gas for road maintenence (we do here) plus something out of your property tax for county road use (we do here), and the registration for your car is supposed to be road tax (it is here), and now they want more! We are getting toll roads up the wahzoo now here.

I have a small theory as to why UK gets gouged so badly for gas. You haven't as far to drive there as we do and your engines/cars are all pretty much the four cylinder variety...maybe? You use less than we do. I wish we could be more like you.
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Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 2nd, 2006, 10:44 pm #4

Europeans are accustomed to paying high prices for petro because they never had much native oil. We Americans got spoiled to cheap gas because for years we had plenty of oil right here in the ground but we have used up most of our native oil and now must use expensive imported oil. The problem is America is much more spread out than Europe- with many people living long distances from where they work. And we don't have as good public transportation as Europeans.
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Bob
Bob

May 2nd, 2006, 11:35 pm #5

Me? Not usually. But, is it too much to hope that the big oil companies (and their pol buddies) have things all work out? Could the plan be: Yes, we could convert from oil/gas to cleaner, renewable fuels of various sorts. But with all the expensive infrastructure in place to retrieve and deliver oil and gas, the "powers that be" don't want to disrupt their gravy train until the last remaining reserves are just about depleted. At that point, the jig is up . . and then will be the process of selling Americans and the rest of the world on new vehicles running different fuels. The means of producing -- thus, selling -- the new fuels will again be centralized, allowing the huge energy corporations to control most of the supply and to set the price (just as has occurred for several decades with oil/gas).

Consider that the countries that have little or no oil reserves are those that offer fuel efficient cars now: Japan and Europe. Meanwhile, the U.S. (while not energy self-sufficient, by a long stretch) remains committed to manufacturing and promoting sales of large, gas-guzzler vehicles. Despite waning sales, the likes of GM and Ford devote more than half (per ABC News) of their production capacity to full-size trucks, vans and SUV's. GM reportedly scraped a program to develop a hybrid vehicle, and the only U.S.-sold Ford hybrid vehicle (to my knowledge) is an SUV -- the Escape. Is there some collusion between the big American automakers and "big oil" to keep Americans tethered to high oil consumption until the time is ripe for change? Makes me wonder.
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Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 3rd, 2006, 1:04 am #6

I think even if we reduce oil consumption the prices are going to stay high anyway. Producers know we are going to pay whatever we have to because we have no choice.

If I was president I was launch an all-out Manhattan-like project to end ALL imported oil through conservation and alternative sources. Ending our dependance on foreign oil would be the best thing this country could ever do. Then we can then totally divorce ourselves of all these two-bit oil producing countries (all of who hate us) and save ourselves a passel of trouble.
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Marseil
Marseil

May 3rd, 2006, 4:35 am #7

Somewhere I noticed a comment about the cost of gas/petrol in US. You might be interested to know how much we pay here in the UK. I did a quick conversion and we are having to pay about US$ 6.80 per US gallon (about 98 pence per litre) for standard unleaded. Of course, most of that goes to our government in tax. This same government is now working out how it can also charge us per mile for the use of the roads. Like we don't pay enough already. How is it on your side of the pond?
On the continent, in France, it is around US$6.50 / US gallon, based on 1.35€ / liter.

Most of it is taxes.

Marseil.
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Marseil
Marseil

May 3rd, 2006, 4:41 am #8

Europeans are accustomed to paying high prices for petro because they never had much native oil. We Americans got spoiled to cheap gas because for years we had plenty of oil right here in the ground but we have used up most of our native oil and now must use expensive imported oil. The problem is America is much more spread out than Europe- with many people living long distances from where they work. And we don't have as good public transportation as Europeans.
Europeans are accustomed to paying higher prices than the americans for petrol because petrol has always been highly taxed and considered as a source of income by all european governments. The price has got nothing to do with the production location. ANywhere you are, the real cost of petrol is production cost + refining + transport. Now, what makes a difference in the end-user price is the level of taxes that are applied to it.

Another question is: why does America not have a good public transportation system ? Isn't the automobile lobby responsible (at leats partly) for this? I read that after WWII, General Motors purchased the Los Angeles streetcar operator, just to let them deteriorate completely, and then everyone asked the system to be dismantled to give waty to making more highways and have more cars....

Marseil (currently in the US)
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Marseil
Marseil

May 3rd, 2006, 4:51 am #9

I think even if we reduce oil consumption the prices are going to stay high anyway. Producers know we are going to pay whatever we have to because we have no choice.

If I was president I was launch an all-out Manhattan-like project to end ALL imported oil through conservation and alternative sources. Ending our dependance on foreign oil would be the best thing this country could ever do. Then we can then totally divorce ourselves of all these two-bit oil producing countries (all of who hate us) and save ourselves a passel of trouble.
Do you think the US can survive without buying anything abroad? Stop buying petrol from the Arabs, textiles from the Chinese, wheat, metal, semi manufactured goods, plastic goods, shoes, paper, etc.....

Isolationism never worked in history. The most perfect attempt for isolationism was what was done in Japan under the Shogun Tokugawa. You know the result? The forced opening of Japan under the orders of Commodore Perry (an Amaerican, by the way), and the fall of the Tokugawas.....

Currently most isolated country is undoubtedly North Korea. Do you want the US to end up like North Korea?

The US made everything in the last 20 years to become the only superpower. They can't retire from the planet now that they acheived this.

Marseil (currently in the US)
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Joined: May 3rd, 2006, 8:38 am

May 3rd, 2006, 9:21 am #10

Currently we are paying about 3 dollars a gallon. It varies some from place to place but its about 50 cents higher than this time last year. And yes, it is frequently pointed out that just about everyone in the world pays more for petro than we Americans do. But that doesn't make it any easier for most Americans because we drive bigger vehicles and more miles than Europeans so we use a lot more gas. I think this is going to have to stop though because the days of cheap gas are gone forever and we are going to have to get use to being more frugal- driving less, and in smaller cars like they do in Europe. Most Americans drive vehicles that are far bigger than they really need. Very few of the people who drive around in 2-ton SUVs really need such things. They are mostly status symbols.
Having flown over the USA at various times, I was always amazed at the size of the country. By comparison, the UK is so compact that we seldom have to drive the sort of distances that you have to. I can see how the cost of moving around in your country would be prohibitive if fuel was taxed to the degree it is in Europe. Regarding driving smaller cars, in such a spacious country, why should you have to cramp yourselves into the kind of cars we drive. We have narrow roads (away from the motorways) both in towns and cities and out in the country, so large cars are a pain. Some years ago I drove a large Buick Le Sabre when working in the Middle East. Having grown up with much smaller cars, this was great fun and out of the city, on the open road, a great cruiser. However, even there, where gas was extremely cheep, our bosses complained about the office fuel bill and eventually we were given European cars with much smaller engines (and less efficient aircon). I would say to you, don't shrink your cars, but just make the engines a bit more efficient.
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