Collecting Oil

Collecting Oil

Bob
Bob

May 18th, 2010, 2:06 am #1

Maybe you heard about this . . . .

These guys work for CW Roberts, big contractor in Walton County,
Florida. They have just received a contract to do the "HAY THING"
for all 26 miles of Walton County, Florida beaches including
Sandestin.

They start off-shore with tug boats and barges spreading or blowing
the hay over the oil.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k5SxX2EntEo
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Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 18th, 2010, 4:28 am #2

Well that is interesting. I just wonder if it will really work in the real world like it does in a metal bowl. I haven't seen it discussed in the news.

And the oil spill in very much in the news down here. Even though it is still hundreds of miles away the "oil spill report" has become a regular part of the nightly weather forecasts- just as if it was a hurricane- they show where it is- and where they think it is going. At this point they think it will start moving south but (hopefully) will pass far enough off shore from our beaches that it will be no problem here as it heads for the keys.
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Marseil
Marseil

May 18th, 2010, 9:20 am #3

Maybe you heard about this . . . .

These guys work for CW Roberts, big contractor in Walton County,
Florida. They have just received a contract to do the "HAY THING"
for all 26 miles of Walton County, Florida beaches including
Sandestin.

They start off-shore with tug boats and barges spreading or blowing
the hay over the oil.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k5SxX2EntEo
Very interesting video.... I'll be happy to know if it works at see as it is demonstrated here....

About this oil story, I'm just disappointed it does not seem to trigger any reflexion about the all-car all-oil society.

And also, I've heard nothing about potential pollution on Mexico and Caribbean shores. Is it that the oil goes only one way or that the information system only looks one way?

Marseil.
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Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 18th, 2010, 1:31 pm #4

What they think will happen is that it will be picked up by a "loop current" which flows southeast from the mid Gulf of Mexico and then meets up with the big "Gulf stream"- which flows from the Caribbean northeast towards Europe so it will be carried away from the Caribbean.

. . . .

But by the time it crosses the Atlantic ocean it will be so diluted with much of it sinking or evaporating that it isn't expected to be much of a problem there. The biggest threat is to the keys and southeast Florida where the Gulf stream runs close to the coast.

Of course, as with hurricanes, the exact path varies with weather conditions and is subject to change.
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