TFE Book Club - Horus Rising

Horus Heresy book-of-the-month! We will nominate one HH novel (or novella) per month for everyone to read, and then have a dedicated thread to discuss it. Please read the rules!

TFE Book Club - Horus Rising

Hyperion
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Joined: 01 Jan 2013, 20:35

03 Sep 2013, 21:38 #1

Welcome to the inauguration of The First Expedition Book Club!

And where better to begin than at the start of the HH series: Horus Rising

The rules are simple:
1. Read Horus Rising by the end of the month
2. The thread will reopen for discussion on 7th October 2013
3. Only discuss the contents of Horus Rising - no references to other material
4. This thread will contain unmarked spoilers for Horus Rising (see rule 1!)

Options for commentary include:
- what was your favourite part and why?
- what is your favourite quote and why?
- how does this book compare to the rest of the series? (in general terms)
- what is your favourite character and why?

See you all back here in a month! Happy reading! :)
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Hyperion
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Joined: 01 Jan 2013, 20:35

07 Oct 2013, 21:54 #2

Well, with all the excitement about Unremembered Empire, I completely forgot about this for a week! :rolleyes:

Better late than never - thread open - discuss away... :)
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Ahriman's Aide
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Joined: 05 Jan 2013, 06:56

08 Oct 2013, 01:45 #3

The Horus Heresy Book Club, and I get to open proceedings.

Well I’ve read Horus Rising not once, but three times this month. Twice as part of my general series read-through, and once on its own especially for this.

Horus Rising is the first in every way. It’s the point upon which the entire series springs, the fountainhead, the origins of the series we love so much. It gives us our first glimpse into the workings of the pre-heresy legions which has since been expanded in the other books and in Betrayal.

It gives us many differences from the Visions books which came before, most notably the Imperial Truth, which did not exist as far as I know in prior Heresy Lore, so it is in many ways a clean slate, taking what we knew and enriching it.

Like many, the opening was certainly a shock. ‘I was there, the day Horus Slew the Emperor’. What a way to open the story. After a while you learn that it isn’t ‘that’ Emperor, but the foreshadowing is spooky and brilliant.

I like how it makes Horus likeable and understandable, and you get a glimpse at why he was chosen as Warmaster, and how far he fell. That is the true genius of Horus Rising.

As the entire heresy series goes, this isn’t actually the best. There’s several reasons why in my opinion. It doesn’t have the emotional highs and lows of the First Heretic or Know No Fear for example, and the slow leadup to finding out about the other Primarchs and the abrupt end are somewhat sad. But they don’t detract from what is overall a brilliant story, and a good start to the saga of the Horus Heresy.
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Aerelleus
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Aerelleus
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Joined: 23 Feb 2013, 12:34

08 Oct 2013, 04:02 #4

it was nice to revisit the beginning again. it was like visiting old friends I missed torgaddons jests and the innocence of loken and how events eventually lead up to him being betrayed. and as ahrimans aide said its excellent how they get you hooked on horus as a likeable and brilliant character who slides into disgrace. a great book all round
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Omegon
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Omegon
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Joined: 06 Jan 2013, 09:52

08 Oct 2013, 10:33 #5

It's not just Horus who is made likeable, but Abaddon to. While he comes across as a hard +SCRAPSHUNTERRORABORT+ you can see an underlying vain of honour.
The Lost Heretic - My mostly hobby related blog
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Ahriman's Aide
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Joined: 05 Jan 2013, 06:56

08 Oct 2013, 11:09 #6

Omegon @ Oct 8 2013, 10:33 AM wrote: It's not just Horus who is made likeable, but Abaddon to. While he comes across as a hard +SCRAPSHUNTERRORABORT+ you can see an underlying vain of honour.

Indeed. The difference between the Horus Rising Abaddon and the False Gods one was quite jarring for me when I read them both. It does show that Abaddon, the arch-traitor of 40k was not always that way, as indeed is true of Horus Himself. Horus Rising is the story of where they all came from, and how far they fell.
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Omegon
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Omegon
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Joined: 06 Jan 2013, 09:52

08 Oct 2013, 12:52 #7

I need to re read False Gods but I think the event with the Interex had a big effect on Abaddon. Also our perspective is from Loken, so we dont really see inside the lodge and how Erebus is influencing the members.
The Lost Heretic - My mostly hobby related blog
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Hyperion
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Joined: 01 Jan 2013, 20:35

11 Oct 2013, 09:22 #8

As I'm reading through Horus Rising again, I'll chuck up some quotes that I like. Here's one from Remembrancer Ignace Karkasy (p53 hardback):

He stared up at the heroic figures painted on the roof of the mezzanine. He had no idea what they were supposed to represent. Some great act of triumph that clearly had involved a great deal of standing on the bodies of the slain with arms thrust into the sky whilst shouting.
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Hyperion
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Joined: 01 Jan 2013, 20:35

12 Oct 2013, 19:17 #9

Here's the next great quote (p84 hardback) from Loken, with hopefully some major foreshadowing:

He tried to picture the manner of his own death. Fabled, imaginary combats flashed through his mind. He imagined himself at the Emperor's side, fighting some great, last stand against an unknown foe. Primarch Horus would be there, of course. He had to be. It wouldn't be the same without him. Loken would battle, and die, and perhaps even Horus would die, to save the Emperor at the last.

Although, Dan did provide an alternative:

Then, briefly, he imagined another death. Alone, far away from his comrades and his Legion, dying from cruel wounds on some nameless rock, his passing as memorable as smoke.
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Hyperion
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Joined: 01 Jan 2013, 20:35

13 Oct 2013, 12:41 #10

An interesting bit of information about Little Horus Aximand that I hadn't noted on previous readings (p246 hardback):

Little Horus, in particular, seemed to have extraordinary insight regarding candidates. He saw true strengths in some that Loken would have dismissed, and flaws in others that Loken liked the look of. Loken began to appreciate that Aximand's place in the Mournival had been earned by his astonishing analytical precision.

While we're on the subject of Little Horus (p78 hardback):

Horus Aximand, Captain of Fifth Company, was the youngest and shortest of them, shorter than Loken. He was squat and robust, like a guard dog. His head was shaved smooth, and oiled, so that the lamp-light gleamed off it. Aximand, like many in the younger generations of the Legion, had been named in honour of the commander, but only he used the name openly. His noble face, with wide-set eyes and firm, straight nose, uncannily resembled the visage of the Warmaster, and this had earned him the affectionate name 'Little Horus'. Little Horus Aximand, the devil-dog in war, the master strategist.

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