oneofmurphysbiscuits
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Joined: April 15th, 2007, 9:12 pm

February 3rd, 2008, 5:36 pm #251

suzannahhh wrote: my faves of willie's work
(in no particular order):

Macbeth
Lear
Othello
Richard III
The Tempest
Merchant of Venice

and Sonnet 116


Let me not to the marriage of true minds
Admit impediments. Love is not love
Which alters when it alteration finds,
Or bends with the remover to remove:
O, no! it is an ever-fixed mark,
That looks on tempests and is never shaken;
It is the star to every wandering bark,
Whose worth's unknown, although his height be taken.
Love's not Time's fool, though rosy lips and cheeks
Within his bending sickle's compass come;
Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,
But bears it out even to the edge of doom.
If this be error and upon me prov'd,
I never writ, nor no man ever lov'd.

a fluctuate on Hamlet
and am much less mad for the comedies

least liked
Romeo and Juliet
Lear and the Tempest, Richard II Othello, Hamlet yes, but i've seen so many performances of so many that it makes a difference to my perceptions and not just over time. When brilliantly inhabited measure for measure is a beautiful piece of theatremaking for justice even unto exhaustion. Michael Gambon's Falstaff. lifting money from the purses of the dead, joking the next in Henry ivth.

The best performances i'v ever seen, Gambon as before, Ralph Fiennes Richard II was literally mesmerising. And Alec McCowen's Prospero. Ian McKellen's Iago to Willard White's Othello
I only think, if that is the name for this vertiginous panic as of hornets smoked out of their nests, once a certain degree of terror has been exceeded
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oneofmurphysbiscuits
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February 3rd, 2008, 6:19 pm #252

After the Death of God - John Caputo/Gianni Vattimo ; Caputo's thinking always starts at the point of slippage between theology/phenomelogy, i should be more specific and say philosophy - but it is - i think - that his work requires of a phenomenological paradigm/inscription which i literally cannot envisage,so. Caputo as ever is lovely without my being able to imagine his thinking as ontically viable, Vattimo is to me suspect when he isn't being dull and Vattimo's conceptual tool - which Caputo sees as brilliantly argued - Caputo is a kinder more open hearted person than i could ever be - is for me dull and unremarkable whilst sometimes following a very dubious trajectory. Caputo delineates very well what's up with some other of the principals at work in postmodern theology; and hears the same alarm bells that i did myself in Vattimo's thinking. I'm glad that John Caputo's here to be thinking and i'll always listen and think, he's very dear to me, whilst his work never works for me, in the end. Which is quite likely where he'd say i was going wrong, before he started laughing.

Emmet Cole interviewd him for TMW once, it's still linked
I only think, if that is the name for this vertiginous panic as of hornets smoked out of their nests, once a certain degree of terror has been exceeded
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Funhouse
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Funhouse
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Joined: December 5th, 2006, 10:24 am

February 4th, 2008, 11:46 am #253

SeizureToday wrote: I really like "Midsummer's": it's accessible, pretty funny, has all sorts of crazy farcical elements about, plenty to discuss on any levels (paternal heirarchy, mirrors between the fairy court and the Athenian court, etc.)... I read it for a class too.

That all being said: the difficult thing would be the 13-year old boys. While I think that Shakespeare's one to be consumed at any age group, I remember that fairies and romance and marriages all around aren't exactly things that appeal to most boys that age. That's about its only hindrance, but really, it's a great segway before you hit the harder stuff; and "Romeo and Juliet" has been done to death.
Yeah, teenage boys really like the bloody stuff. Macbeth and Richard III work really well with them for that reason, and there are good film versions of both. When I teach Romeo & Juliet I get all conspiratorial and ask them not to tell their parents and then explain all of the filthy puns and jokes in the opening banter between the servants.

Midsummer we teach because as you say it is pretty accessible. You can connect it with the fantasy books they all read. And teenage boys understand wanting to escape from oppressive parental control. Blood might be better, but we teach plenty of other bloody material to them...
?He wishes he had never entered the funhouse. But he has. Then he wishes he were dead. But he's not. Therefore he will construct funhouses for others and be their secret operator--though he would rather be among the lovers for whom funhouses are designed.?
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fidusachates
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fidusachates
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Joined: June 22nd, 2007, 2:58 pm

February 4th, 2008, 1:44 pm #254

Yukio Mishima's The Temple of Dawn and The Decay of the Angel .

Not bad, but not great, [/B]The Sea of Fertility tetralogy of which the aforementioned are the penultimate and ultimate.

lepel alip, alup a lap
-- JJ, Finnegans Wake
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Tudwell
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Tudwell
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February 5th, 2008, 1:55 am #255

The Gift by Nabokov
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kline19
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Joined: November 24th, 2006, 3:19 am

February 5th, 2008, 4:47 pm #256

Marks Of Identity -- Juan Goytisolo
The love hoarded all your life ... for the work, and his lips still moved silently over that last word - TR
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kl0pper
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kl0pper
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Joined: November 21st, 2006, 9:07 am

February 6th, 2008, 8:32 am #257

read the human war in a single sitting, ~ an hour. great novella about the current war.
certum est quia impossibile
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SeizureToday
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SeizureToday
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Joined: April 14th, 2007, 10:24 pm

February 7th, 2008, 4:27 am #258

Lolita.

It was pretty good. "Pale Fire" is better.
Truthful speaking would be a simple way to tell the truth, if the whole truth were simple, and could be told.
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ions
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ions
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Joined: December 3rd, 2006, 3:11 pm

February 7th, 2008, 6:18 pm #259

Roughing it in the Bush by Susanna Moodie, 237 pages. Assigned.
Currently reading: "A Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich" by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
Periodically reading: Collected Fictions by Jorge Luis Borges and the Collected Works of Nietzsche
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ions
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ions
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Joined: December 3rd, 2006, 3:11 pm

February 8th, 2008, 10:28 pm #260

Maria Chapdelaine by Louis Hémon, 162 pages. Assigned.
Currently reading: "A Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich" by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
Periodically reading: Collected Fictions by Jorge Luis Borges and the Collected Works of Nietzsche
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