Prose by Poets

johnnywalkitoff
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Joined: January 18th, 2007, 4:56 am

January 31st, 2013, 12:15 am #1

I was just curious if we could get a list going...my interest was raised by Dave and then I am reading a book by James McCourt who apparently wrote a book about James Schuyler and then that led to remembering
A Nest of Ninnies of Ashbery/Schuyler (read, but don't remember much...two serious ladies comes to mind...?)
& then I put together a very small list:

What's for Dinner? and Alfred and Guinevere by Schuyler
Leaving the Atocha Station by Ben Lerner (read)
The (Diblos) Notebook and The Seraglio by Merrill
Recovery by Berryman (read, left no impression...fucking alcoholic and recovery books seem good in theory but I've yet to read a really great one...even Lunar Caustic by Lowry, something by Richard Yates was not memorable at all..see, don't even remember the title)

Can you add to that (yes, you can!)? Someone thought of as primarily a poet who wrote novels too...O williams, I've read a few of his, maybe I'll read them again) and yeah, The Notebooks of Malte Laurids Brigge by Rilke (never read)

The clock is a ceiling fan with no breeze.

Why do you, in becoming a crowd, look as plain and anonymous as a smear of dull and dying flowers?
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January 31st, 2013, 12:27 am #2

Richard Hugo wrote a fine mystery novel.
Allen Tate wrote a very interesting novel called "The Fathers"
I think among Kenneth Koch's prose is a novel.
Philip Larkin wrote a novel too.
James Dickey too. And his is super famous.

That's all I have without getting up from this chair.

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January 31st, 2013, 12:34 am #3

And you're not fair to Berryman's book, I mean it's a fragment, what do you want.
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johnnywalkitoff
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January 31st, 2013, 12:49 am #4

Canox wrote:And you're not fair to Berryman's book, I mean it's a fragment, what do you want.
it talks down, it's didactic, it's almost an AA pamphlet and yeah I hold Berryman to a higher standard than that, fragment or not, Lowry's Lunar Caustic is much better...and James Dickey much like the most famous Hugo is sort of a novelist first in many people eye's..don't you think?
The clock is a ceiling fan with no breeze.

Why do you, in becoming a crowd, look as plain and anonymous as a smear of dull and dying flowers?
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johnnywalkitoff
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January 31st, 2013, 12:53 am #5

What is the book by a poet and I can't remember it's name (but I'm pretty sure it's by a he and maybe his only novel) and it's about a boarding school or college novel; I think it was in the era of Mary McCarthy.


edit: Randall Jarrell, Pictures from an Institution.
The clock is a ceiling fan with no breeze.

Why do you, in becoming a crowd, look as plain and anonymous as a smear of dull and dying flowers?
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January 31st, 2013, 1:08 am #6

johnnywalkitoff wrote:
Canox wrote:And you're not fair to Berryman's book, I mean it's a fragment, what do you want.
it talks down, it's didactic, it's almost an AA pamphlet and yeah I hold Berryman to a higher standard than that, fragment or not, Lowry's Lunar Caustic is much better...and James Dickey much like the most famous Hugo is sort of a novelist first in many people eye's..don't you think?
1. "almost like an aa pamphlet"? Have you read the book? It's directly modeled on the AA rules, explicitly, if I remember correctly, so, yeah, it is. Berryman is using the form, or trying to, in order to frame the story. It's a fragment. It would have been much better finished. Ugh. Now I want to reread it. Maybe I'm wrong. >:<

2. Dickey is a novelist first in the eyes of idiots. His work is like 90% poetry and 10% prose and he is a great poet (anyone want to buy me the collected poems? I give good head. Think about it). It's fucking erroneous to call him a novelist who wrote poetry or someone who did both equally. James fucking Dickey was a poet, and an influential one. He got famous through ONE novel, and overall he wrote like three. The VH comparison is nonsense because VH is more like Goethe: both wrote a lot of poems but also a lot of novels and a lot of drama.
Also, Dickey is not like Robert Penn Warren. Warren wrote a lot of novels, and there is a legitimate case to me made to say he is just as much a novelist as he is a poet, even if All the King's Men had not been this massive success,.
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nnyhav
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nnyhav
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January 31st, 2013, 1:09 am #7

yer thinkin of Randall Jarrell, Pictures from an Institution ... my take on A Nest of Ninnies

others
Barbara Guest, Seeking Air (just started her collected ...)
Robert Creeley, The Island
Czeslaw Misolz, The Issa Valley (a bit tricky, verging on memoir, but)
Adam Foulds, The Quickening Maze: redolent of Penelope Fitzgerald, high praise in my book

and Jacek's favorite, Wendell Berry ...
and this is just novels ... I mean just some novels ...
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January 31st, 2013, 1:12 am #8

nnyhav wrote:
and Jacek's favorite, Wendell Berry ...
but he, man, he wrote a fuckload of prose.

You would really consider him a poet first and foremost, who also writes prose?
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January 31st, 2013, 1:19 am #9

I have an unread edition of Zukofsky's prose that I'm pretty sure contains a novel

checked it. yep. "Little", apparently his only novel.
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nnyhav
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nnyhav
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January 31st, 2013, 1:31 am #10

Canox wrote:
nnyhav wrote:
and Jacek's favorite, Wendell Berry ...
but he, man, he wrote a fuckload of prose.

You would really consider him a poet first and foremost, who also writes prose?
dunno, before Jacek I'd only known about his poetry

but on another track, I was stopped short by Bart van Es' TLS Commentary this week on Robert Armin, Shakespeare's fool (and a writer his own self), who wasn't averse to cashing in on the relationship afterwards: "The third edition of Fool upon Fool [published as he replaced Kemp as S's company comic] (revised under the title A Nest of Ninnies) proudly trumpets 'our Globe' and again invokes Shakespeare by telling readers 'love loses not his labour' and warning that "there are as Hamlet says things called whips in store." (my bold)
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