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January 31st, 2013, 11:31 pm #31

nnyhav wrote:memoirs and essays overextend this thang but the line between prose poem and story is kinda blurry, and short story would lasso a lot more (eg Bishop) ...

I first encountered W.S.Merwin thru The Miner's Pale Children, micronarratives (as noted in link within link on Ninnies), but The Lost Uplands includes the novella-length "Shepherds" ...
Yeah but the only prose Bishop published was part of a collection of poetry. If you count that, you have to count 99 revere street etc. There are so many poets with short stories/prose interspersed in what are really collections of poems.


turns out I am the pedantic asshole of this thread
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suzannahhh
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January 31st, 2013, 11:35 pm #32

that may be, Marcel
but I agree
wid ya

prose here ought to mean the novel
or at least short stories
not flashes not prose poems
but real honest to goddess
fictional works of some heft
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miercuri
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February 1st, 2013, 12:04 am #33

Canox wrote:Just thought of two German cases.

Ulla Hahn wrote very solid poetry for a long time, and then she had a breakthrough novel. Now she's written two.

Also two novels wrote Ursula Krechel who is a fantastic poet, but she write two novels in the past few years and just won the German Book Award for her sophomore effort.
Well, Cartarescu was a pretty solid poet for the first third of his career. One of the best if not the best of his generation of poets. Published quite a bit, I still think he has more volumes of poetry published than novels. And then he wrote that epic poem, the untranslatable intertextual parody/history of ealry Romanian literature. And then he wrote Nostalgia which is a novel but made up of parts that can just as well be read separately. Afterwards came Travesti and Orbitor and some minor prose work, plus diaries and journalism and essays which are not so good. If I'm not mistaked there is a recent volume of poems too, but I'm not sure if it's new or just previously unpublished stuff he dug out because his publisher contractually obliges him to hand in something every year. He's working on another big novel though.
"Though love appears far off,
you will move into its depth."
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alliknowis
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February 1st, 2013, 1:40 am #34

Canox wrote:
alliknowis wrote:Marina Tsvetaeva's autobiographical writings, some of the most astonishing I've ever read.
yeah but you can't count autobiographical writings, can you?

You'd have to add very single other poet, right?
Why don't they count?? They're prose! And I would put hardly any other poet's prose memoirs alongside hers...
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alliknowis
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February 1st, 2013, 1:41 am #35

miercuri wrote:
Canox wrote:Just thought of two German cases.

Ulla Hahn wrote very solid poetry for a long time, and then she had a breakthrough novel. Now she's written two.

Also two novels wrote Ursula Krechel who is a fantastic poet, but she write two novels in the past few years and just won the German Book Award for her sophomore effort.
Well, Cartarescu was a pretty solid poet for the first third of his career. One of the best if not the best of his generation of poets. Published quite a bit, I still think he has more volumes of poetry published than novels. And then he wrote that epic poem, the untranslatable intertextual parody/history of ealry Romanian literature. And then he wrote Nostalgia which is a novel but made up of parts that can just as well be read separately. Afterwards came Travesti and Orbitor and some minor prose work, plus diaries and journalism and essays which are not so good. If I'm not mistaked there is a recent volume of poems too, but I'm not sure if it's new or just previously unpublished stuff he dug out because his publisher contractually obliges him to hand in something every year. He's working on another big novel though.
Oh wow, any news you can give us about this big novel Cartarescu is working on? What will he write about after Orbitor I wonder..
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February 1st, 2013, 1:57 am #36

alliknowis wrote:
Canox wrote:
alliknowis wrote:Marina Tsvetaeva's autobiographical writings, some of the most astonishing I've ever read.
yeah but you can't count autobiographical writings, can you?

You'd have to add very single other poet, right?
Why don't they count?? They're prose! And I would put hardly any other poet's prose memoirs alongside hers...
subtitle of this thread asks for novels.

What do you think of Neruda's memoirs?
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miercuri
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February 1st, 2013, 2:22 am #37

alliknowis wrote:
miercuri wrote:
Canox wrote:Just thought of two German cases.

Ulla Hahn wrote very solid poetry for a long time, and then she had a breakthrough novel. Now she's written two.

Also two novels wrote Ursula Krechel who is a fantastic poet, but she write two novels in the past few years and just won the German Book Award for her sophomore effort.
Well, Cartarescu was a pretty solid poet for the first third of his career. One of the best if not the best of his generation of poets. Published quite a bit, I still think he has more volumes of poetry published than novels. And then he wrote that epic poem, the untranslatable intertextual parody/history of ealry Romanian literature. And then he wrote Nostalgia which is a novel but made up of parts that can just as well be read separately. Afterwards came Travesti and Orbitor and some minor prose work, plus diaries and journalism and essays which are not so good. If I'm not mistaked there is a recent volume of poems too, but I'm not sure if it's new or just previously unpublished stuff he dug out because his publisher contractually obliges him to hand in something every year. He's working on another big novel though.
Oh wow, any news you can give us about this big novel Cartarescu is working on? What will he write about after Orbitor I wonder..
Ha, well, I remember from the interview he said he always writes about Mircea Cartarescu, so in the same sense Orbitor was a novel about Mircea Cartarescu, this one will be too. He also said that after the post-Orbitor block writing was finally working well again and coming along fast. Hopefully it will be ready soonish, a year or two... Final volume of Orbitor took a decade to complete.
"Though love appears far off,
you will move into its depth."
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A Common Reader
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February 1st, 2013, 10:42 pm #38

A number of obvious ones seem to have been missed. Pushkin first with his marvelous stories like the "Queen of Spades". Goethe with The Sorrow of Young Werther" and "Elective Affinities". The most obvious for me would be Hardy- after all he considered himself a poet first and foremost.

There is also Lermontov with "A Hero of Our Time"

I know David Malouf was mentioned earlier but I really consider him a poet first whose has written some first class novels. His "An Imaginary Life" about Ovid's exile to Ostia is exquisite.
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February 1st, 2013, 11:04 pm #39

A Common Reader wrote:A number of obvious ones seem to have been missed. Pushkin first with his marvelous stories like the "Queen of Spades". Goethe with The Sorrow of Young Werther" and "Elective Affinities". The most obvious for me would be Hardy- after all he considered himself a poet first and foremost.

There is also Lermontov with "A Hero of Our Time"

I know David Malouf was mentioned earlier but I really consider him a poet first whose has written some first class novels. His "An Imaginary Life" about Ovid's exile to Ostia is exquisite.
Oh, Goethe was very much not a poet who also wrote novels. I mentioned him earlier. It's not even as if he made his career in poetry and then segued into poetry. I consider him to be one of those 18th/19th century writers like Victor Hugo or Schiller, who just did everything equally well.


The David Malouf thing is interesting. I don't know much about him, apart from the novels I read. Why do you consider him a poet first? After all, his poetry career runs mostly parallel to his prose career. Two early collections of poetry, but then already the first novel. I think there are plenty of novelists/poets who had one or two collections of poetry first. Grass, for example, started as a poet (and a fantastically good one, too). I think there would be a better case for Ondaatje. But I think Ondaatje, like Malouf, Atwood and Grass and others belong to the category of poet/novelists.

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oneofmurphysbiscuits
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February 1st, 2013, 11:24 pm #40

wherefore Sam then? :) (in adddition to as before, Pushkin et al)
I only think, if that is the name for this vertiginous panic as of hornets smoked out of their nests, once a certain degree of terror has been exceeded
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