Poetry

onefatman
onefatman

December 20th, 2006, 11:59 am #1

Do you guys read poetry at all? And if so, which sort? The beat-ish kind? longpoems? the cantos? newer poetry? o'hara? merrill? gunslinger?olson/creeley? robert hass/louise gluck? clampitt? jorie graham?

but this community seems very prose-ish. =)
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suzannahhh
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suzannahhh
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Joined: November 20th, 2006, 4:54 pm

December 20th, 2006, 12:19 pm #2

hmmm
well I have about 39
running feet
of shelf space
devoted to poetry
all kinds

a collection of epic poems
(who knew there were so many_
from Homer forward;
from Provence;
Alice Notley;
Anne Waldman;
Chas. Olson

yes even ole Ezra
(whom I am not all that fond of)

chapbooks abounding
of contemporary poets
collected works
my favorite being Octavio Paz

when I started writing poetry again
10 years ago
after a break of several decades
I read no poetry
other than my own
and that of a far-Northern berserkerpoet friend
as I didn't want to write
under the "influence"

but a couple of years ago
I started reading
because beyond
being concerned about influence
any longer

I'm just about to post up
today's efforts
in Your Writing




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orlando
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orlando
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Joined: November 22nd, 2006, 3:00 pm

December 20th, 2006, 2:52 pm #3

I find I am reading more and more poetry having started to write it in recent years. Current and recent reads include anne michaels, craig raine, ted hughes, sylvia plath, phillip Larkin (these latter three being my favourites), thomas hardy, Blake and Shakespeare's sonnets. I'm slowly acquainting myself with the classics and also want to read a lot more contemporary poetry.


Thy thee that starts, Is, already.
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WilliamTwellman
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Joined: November 20th, 2006, 7:34 pm

December 20th, 2006, 5:52 pm #4

Coleridge. LAUTREMONT
These fragments I have shored against my ruins
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onefatman
onefatman

December 20th, 2006, 6:38 pm #5

@tonyH: very (good but) british taste. good (not as good as hughes or the almighty larkin though) contemporary british poet: michael hulse.
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orlando
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orlando
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December 20th, 2006, 6:52 pm #6

onefatman wrote: @tonyH: very (good but) british taste. good (not as good as hughes or the almighty larkin though) contemporary british poet: michael hulse.
Yes very british of me - also very newish to poetry of me too I think. I haven't heard of Hulse so will keep an eye out now. I was thinking of breaking out of my island bonds with some Rimbaud and Baudelaire but will have to read them in translation due to my poor French -- or is that sacrilege?


Thy thee that starts, Is, already.
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laszlopaniflex
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Joined: December 5th, 2006, 3:02 pm

December 20th, 2006, 7:57 pm #7

A couple years ago, the poetry light went on suddenly and brightly.

I like Ashbery, James Tate, Cummings, Dickinson, Wallace Stevens, Olson, Creeley, Charles Simic, Russell Edson, Tom Raworth, J. H. Prynne, etc.

My favorite is A. R. Ammons.

-matt
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onefatman
onefatman

December 21st, 2006, 10:55 am #8

sacrilege. no but try to read them in a prose translation. you'll lose the music but the beauty of the words you'll keep. for rimbaud the only great english translation i know is by beckett.
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suzannahhh
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suzannahhh
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Joined: November 20th, 2006, 4:54 pm

December 21st, 2006, 11:23 am #9

since I've been collecting epics
I admit I have three or four different translations
of the Odyssey

the whole "THING" about translation
is fascinating to me

manyh books of poetry
PAz, Rilke, Neruda, Borges
are bi-lingual editions

matter of fact the Spanish I can read(haltingly)
derives
from my Latin French, English
and Paz's bcoolected of bi-lingual . . .

I'd really like to get really proficient
in several languages

there's a great book written in the 40's
called The Loom of LAnguage
and I'm certain if I were to go through it
assiduously
I'd come out the other end
well versed in about eight llanguages

the teutonic and romance ones
I have everything I need here
to get my Latin back up to speed
along with French, Italian, Spanish and German

currently so busy reading and writing in English
though
that I haven't inserted this particular
project into steady daily attention






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onefatman
onefatman

December 21st, 2006, 11:29 am #10

since I've been collecting epics
I admit I have three or four different translations
of the Odyssey


I own a chinese version of the odyssee. can't read it though. looks incredibly strange.


i have great difficulties reading translated poetry since i compared for example walter benjamins translations of baudelaire with the magnificent original poems and was shocked at the injustice the translation did to the poems. its always difficult to translate literature well. with poetry it is nearly impossible.
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