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4:35 PM - Sep 05, 2016 #21

yeah, i'm not saying I necessarily am all for h. murakami winning, but like didi said... plus, i can see the case being made. similar to oe, he's accused of "reeking of butter," writing like a foreigner, a westerner; he's warped the language in a way to fit his purpose, his fancy for american literature, using similar syntax, replacing idioms with their american equivalents, and being at pains to reduce the intentional vagueness built into Japanese. however, I don't want it construed that I believe what he's achieved with the language is anywhere close to oe - now, he's raped and brutalised and has transformed it in a way that defies its history. but then again, genius is lonely, and some of the biggest stars of contemporary japanese (tawada, ogawa, kawakami, matsuura (yoshimoto, r murakami, and shimada would have to be excluded)) have direct links to h. murakami's prose and themes, not oe's.

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Didi
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11:09 PM - Sep 06, 2016 #22

Minor rumours of a speculative fiction writer being considered or a writer that has written something within that genre. The nobel prize has been awarded to a number in the later category (I have counted nine thus far, Lessing the most recent winning at the age of 88, noting Canopus in Argos).

I still think it will be a woman from outside of Europe and to cover one from only three continents within this context (i.e either predominately wrote spec fiction or have some works in this category):

North America: 86 year old Le Guin for sure is firmly in the race. The recent "The Library of America" inclusion is a distinct honour especially whilst still alive: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/08/29/books ... .html?_r=0 I will be reading more of her works thx to Jacek.

South America: 88 year old Argentine author Angélica Gorodischer, numerous literary awards (eg World Fantasy Lifetime Achievement Award.) and non-literary awards (eg Permanent Assembly for Human Rights for works and activity in women`s rights), prolific, covering a variety of genres and the wiki entry does not do justice to her bibliography (especially the last few years). Speculative fiction is what she is best known for outside Argentina (Kalpa Imperial: The Greatest Empire That Never Was, in particular, which I enjoyed) but I was more impressed by the lesser read Prodigies (which she considers her best work). Of course Le Guin is a fan (tr, her). Its been over 70 years since a Latin American woman has won the prize. Mistral was the very first Latin American, and the only Latin American woman, to receive the Nobel Prize (1945).

Asia: Can Xue, I think based on a few essays on her designated masterpiece I have read, if a translation of Frontiers has been made available to the Academy, Can will be a serious consideration. I also think some of the Academy’s new members would be more open in considering her. However more a future prospect rather than immediate.

My current thoughts are that Le Guin will win this year even when ignoring the baseless rumours.
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redhead
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11:41 PM - Sep 06, 2016 #23

Where did those rumors about a speculative fiction author come from? I'd love to see it happen and would welcome Le Guin but really can't imagine it occurring, at least not this year.

As for Can Xue, is Frontiers her masterpiece you're talking about? Or a different book? She would be a great winner but I agree that she'd have to wait for a while.
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Jacek
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1:22 AM - Sep 07, 2016 #24

I would like for her to win, if only because it'd mean we'd get a nice long acceptance speech out of it, and because a lot of people who otherwise wouldn't would then buy and hopefully read her 800-page Collected Novellas tome, arriving mid-October.
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Didi
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5:39 AM - Sep 07, 2016 #25

sorry red for being unclear, I was referring to Frontier and see if I can find the link

thx Jacek, also pre-ordered the selected short fiction issue coming out in the following month which is double that size.
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2:26 PM - Sep 07, 2016 #26

That's grand, Didi. Between those two volumes you'll be getting a lot of her best work.
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nnyhav
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5:05 AM - Sep 08, 2016 #27

via otherforum, Ladbrokes openers:
5/1 Haruki Murakami
7/1 Ngugi Wa Thiong'o
8/1 Philip Roth
16/1 Ismail Kadare, Joyce Carol Oates
20/1 Jon Fosse
25/1 Adunis, Peter Handke, Peter Nadas, Amos Oz
33/1 Ko Un, John Banville, Adam Zagajewski, Antonio Lobo Antunes, Juan Marse, Kjell Askildsen, Doris Kareva
50/1 Ursula Le Guin, Marilynne Robinson, Nawal El Saadawi, Milan Kundera, Thomas Pynchon, Lydia Davis, Cees Nooteboom, Mircea Cartarescu, Bob Dylan, Les Murray, Leonard Nolens, Laszlo Krasznahorkai, Gerald Murnane, Jaan Kaplinski, Jussi Adler-Olsen, Olga Tokarczuk
66/1 David Malouf, Peter Carey, Karol Schoeman. William Trevor, Javier Marias, Yan Lianke, Bei Dao, Rohinton Mistry, Nuruddin Farah, Darcia Maraini, Margaret Atwood, Don DeLillo, Richard Ford, Karl Ove Knausgard, Paul Muldoon, Juan Goytisolo, Salman Rushdie, Cormac McCathy, Tom Stoppard, Colm Toibin, Joan Didion, Eduardo Mendoza-Garriga, Enrique Vila-Matas
100/1 Don Patterson, A S Byatt, John Ashbery, Yevgeniy Yevtushenko, James Kelman, Hilary Mantel, F Sioni Jose

(last year's openers)

(Doris Kareva? Jussi Adler-Olsen??)
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Didi
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7:45 AM - Sep 08, 2016 #28

quite a few changes from last year except the rollover of the front runners, two I have been thinking about as having a very strong chance to win Le Guin (per previous post) and Marilynne Robinson (not posted on yet) have moved from 25/1 last year to 50/1 this year.
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Bjorn
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8:27 AM - Sep 08, 2016 #29

nnyhav wrote:Jussi Adler-Olsen??
Karl-Ove Knausgård??

Well, as per usual, I guess they need a few familiar names to take in a few hundred bucks... I'm really surprised at Adler-Olsen, though, Ladbrokes are usually not quite as shameless as some betting firms who'll throw in any old bestseller.
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nnyhav
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4:07 PM - Sep 08, 2016 #30

Bjorn wrote:
nnyhav wrote:Jussi Adler-Olsen??
Karl-Ove Knausgård??

Well, as per usual, I guess they need a few familiar names to take in a few hundred bucks... I'm really surprised at Adler-Olsen, though, Ladbrokes are usually not quite as shameless as some betting firms who'll throw in any old bestseller.
yeah I was parenthesizing the names new to this year's list, Karl-Ove was on last year's, but Jussi gets the extra question-mark for just the reason you give (the new names are amongst those nicerodds includes in Didi's inception post)

the list means so much less since Magnus Puke left Ladbrokes, but it has piqued my curiosity about Kareva, first I'd heard of her ...

add: silly me, Olga Tokarczuk wasn't on last year's list either
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