Joined: July 5th, 2015, 5:03 pm

November 29th, 2015, 4:58 pm #431

@Bjorn, which books of his did you read? He has two distinctive stages in his career, so someone who likes the former might not enjoy the latter. Revolutions is nominally a parallel bildungsroman. A young adolescent growing up in contemporary times who learns about his great-grandfather, the chapters switching viewpoints. It has a panoply of his favored topoi: nature, a lost paradise, the wickedness of man, the ennui of academy, war, national identity, pop culture, nautical adventures, food, childhood. It's ambitious, messy, at times pandering, and I doubt you'll go away from it changed for life, but it's a fun, enjoyable read.

@redhead, yeah, if you like Interrogation, you'll like Giants. (I read a first-edition hardcover from the library, and, not being familiar with the recently-printed paperbacks/English, perhaps you should do the same because mine had transparent pages, fold-out ones, varying fonts, and more.) Basically everything of his in the Gallimard L'Imaginaire is great - but Fever can be skipped. That collection is fantastic for finding experimental, forward-thinking literature, by the way. http://www.gallimard.fr/searchinternet/ ... hAction=OK

Considering you like the sentences of Oe and Simon and the the ideas of Bellow, I recommend you check out a book I mentioned before, Yaakov Shabtai's Past Continuous. You'll love it.
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Bjorn
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November 29th, 2015, 8:06 pm #432

Bloß ein Língshān wrote:@Bjorn, which books of his did you read? He has two distinctive stages in his career, so someone who likes the former might not enjoy the latter. Revolutions is nominally a parallel bildungsroman. A young adolescent growing up in contemporary times who learns about his great-grandfather, the chapters switching viewpoints. It has a panoply of his favored topoi: nature, a lost paradise, the wickedness of man, the ennui of academy, war, national identity, pop culture, nautical adventures, food, childhood. It's ambitious, messy, at times pandering, and I doubt you'll go away from it changed for life, but it's a fun, enjoyable read.
I've read books from both his eras, specifically Terra Amata and Raga and ... some other book I can't think of just now. I probably preferred Terra Amata for its innovativeness, but there was something in the measured mythtelling of the latter that I really liked too.
I did not get into rock'n'roll to play rock'n'roll! (Blixa Bargeld)
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redhead
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November 29th, 2015, 11:58 pm #433

Bloß ein Língshān wrote:@redhead, yeah, if you like Interrogation, you'll like Giants. (I read a first-edition hardcover from the library, and, not being familiar with the recently-printed paperbacks/English, perhaps you should do the same because mine had transparent pages, fold-out ones, varying fonts, and more.) Basically everything of his in the Gallimard L'Imaginaire is great - but Fever can be skipped. That collection is fantastic for finding experimental, forward-thinking literature, by the way. http://www.gallimard.fr/searchinternet/ ... hAction=OK

Considering you like the sentences of Oe and Simon and the the ideas of Bellow, I recommend you check out a book I mentioned before, Yaakov Shabtai's Past Continuous. You'll love it.
Thanks for the recs, Shabtai sounds right up my alley and early Le Clezio definitely interests me. Unfortunately, it seems like despite many of them getting translated into English, his Nobel win did little to raise their profile, with the exception of The Interrogation. What did you think of some of his other early works, like Book of Flights, War and Fever?
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Joined: July 5th, 2015, 5:03 pm

November 30th, 2015, 4:14 pm #434

His essays and travel memoirs, like Raga, are different from the other fictional work he wrote during that time, unfortunately. If you liked Terra Amata, you might as well keep up with the nouveau roman phase. Though, since you own Revolutions, I'd say give it a shot. It's not as mythic, but it is dyed with sadness and nostalgia: those are common themes of myths!

Fever is a short-story collection. Not the biggest fan, but the writing is strong. The ludic typography/addressing his readers/experimental techniques aren't present, however (if I recall). Flood has a bizarrely boring beginning, which he tends to do almost as a 'yes, i am intelligent, i shall show my acuity and how well i write, conforming to your standards, then i'll write how i deign, and this will be my shield.' Looking back, the structure of the novel, with that introduction, is meant to be a hot tidal wave, with the deluge of emotions hitting you at the end, when you figure out what's happened (not that it isn't too difficult to guess). Terra Amata is super fun; there's even a portion written in sign language. I have War, Voyages de l'autre côté, and Flights waiting on the shelves.
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Bjorn
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December 9th, 2015, 9:20 am #435

I did not get into rock'n'roll to play rock'n'roll! (Blixa Bargeld)
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redhead
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December 9th, 2015, 8:02 pm #436

If Cartarescu wins in 2025, I'll be surprised... because I would've guessed he would get it earlier than that.

A few others I've already seen mentioned already as possibilities down the road (Ndiaye, Tokarczuk, Kausgaard (though I think Fosse will beat him to the punch and then the academy won't go back to Norway for a while)), the English authors seem like odd choices based on reputations and the little I've read of them but I suppose they could rally (Franzen would be an interesting pick just for all the salt it would create), and Houellebecq...that's not going to happen anytime soon, if ever. The others are enigmas to me.
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December 10th, 2015, 1:28 am #437

Or they could award both Fosse and Knausgård in the same year! (insert eye roll). I'm looking forward to seeing Alexievich's and the rest of the laureates' diplomas. That's always a highlight.
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Didi
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March 27th, 2018, 10:43 pm #438

Bloß ein Língshān wrote:yeah! it's one of the books that the appellation 'neglected masterpiece' unquestionably is veracious. from the kaleidoscopic cast, to the pastoral descriptions, to the rendering the Torah pliable (how Agnon's able to weave quotes upon quotes on every page yet it all fit the story), to the teetering of telenovela but having the tact to know when enough is enough, to the allegory of the mongrel Balak (for whom the French version was named after, since he's so scene stealy), to the breadth and chewiness of the novel and its end results (rather than finishing a big book and feeling the time wasted, you -are- going to leave with something). can't say I was bewitched the entire time - some tachyon would have been welcome - but yeah, great book. Reading it in Hebrew must be incredible, though the translation in English is purportedly magnificent. If you haven't started reading it, I recommend you skip the introduction and consider it an afterword. (I also have a fifty-page essay by Avraham Holtz on the translation and the book, should you want to read it.)
per agnon thread
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Joined: July 5th, 2015, 5:03 pm

March 28th, 2018, 1:55 am #439

Thank you very much, Didi. I'm surprised you were able to find it. The forum has been bugging, and google has even made it difficult to search. :facepalm:
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Cleanthes
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March 28th, 2018, 9:39 pm #440

Others have been noticing the crapification of Google:

https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=16153840
Don't take life so serious, son. It ain't nohow permanent.
?\_(ツ)_/?
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