Joined: 5:03 PM - Jul 05, 2015

11:48 PM - Oct 28, 2015 #421

Hey Clean, did you read Pinocchio in Italian or French or Spanish or English? I've been meaning to reread it, since I was super young when I first did so, and not sure which version/translator.

@DDR, maybe I'll read L&D with you... just don't read the retched (wretched) puke that is Big Breasts and Wide Hips (in English).
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DDR
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8:18 PM - Oct 29, 2015 #422

Hope it's way better than The Garlic Ballads. Number of pages is almost double and I had a lot of problems to finish it.
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Cleanthes
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9:55 PM - Oct 29, 2015 #423

Bloß ein Língshān wrote:Hey Clean, did you read Pinocchio in Italian or French or Spanish or English? I've been meaning to reread it, since I was super young when I first did so, and not sure which version/translator.

@DDR, maybe I'll read L&D with you... just don't read the retched (wretched) puke that is Big Breasts and Wide Hips (in English).
All of 'em. I've been a big fan of Pinocchio since I read Coover's further adventures of professor Pinocchio. The NYRB translation is fun, specially page 15.
Don't take life so serious, son. It ain't nohow permanent.
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Joined: 5:03 PM - Jul 05, 2015

12:25 AM - Oct 30, 2015 #424

~~! Well, NYRB it shall be. Many thanks.
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redhead
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5:00 PM - Nov 27, 2015 #425

Flipping through David Marr's biography of Patrick White, I came across a section detailing the Nobel prize process for him.

According to Marr, Artur Lundkvist took a seat in the academy in 68 in order help secure the prize for 3 writers: Pablo Neruda, Patrick White, and Vincente Aleixandre (also later helped Claude Simon net it and prevented Graham Greene from taking it home). This resulted in the three of them getting on to the shortlist in 69. It's unclear if White was on the short list in all years until 73, but by that year Lundkvist felt like if White didn't get it that year he never would (so I guess the academy could hypothetically move past a perennial candidate after 5 or so years). That year's shortlist was Saul Bellow, Norman Mailer, Chinua Achebe, Wole Soyinka, and Nadine Gordimer. It sounds like only 4 or so academy members were able to read The Eye of the Storm before voting on the prize; I wonder how often that's happened, where not everyone can read some of a writer's works and instead just rely on the opinion of a few members (I have a feeling that definitely happened with Xingjian and Mo Yan). The runner up was Bellow, and they were actually in a deadlock before Harry Martinson decided to give it to White in order to give Australia it's first prize, confirming what we all thought and the academy denies: geography does matter.

It sounds like this information was taken from some of Lundkvist's notes and letters, so I'm inclined to believe it (though we'll have to wait a few years before it can be confirmed). I thought the shortlist was especially interesting, already considering Gordimer or Soyinka who had yet written the works they're most famous for, and thank god they didn't give it to Mailer.
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Joined: 5:03 PM - Jul 05, 2015

8:57 PM - Nov 27, 2015 #426

I'm still confused about Wole. His plays suck. His prospectus on the Nobel website cites his plays as the motivating work for the prize, yet he's categorized in the list of authors as a novelist and poet. What am I to read from this man?
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redhead
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7:00 PM - Nov 28, 2015 #427

In the press release they give special mention to the plays Death and the King's Horseman, A Dance of Forests, and A Play of Giants, along with some of his poetry and essays. Considering they have Gao Xingjian just listed as a prose writer, I wouldn't take those categories too seriously.

(also, bopping around the Nobel site, I saw for Le Clezio that the books they gave most mention to were, aside from Desert, Revolutions and The African. Has anyone read those ones?)
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Joined: 5:03 PM - Jul 05, 2015

7:32 PM - Nov 28, 2015 #428

Yeah, his work is difficult to translate because of its poetic simplicity, like Le Petit Prince or Catcher in the Rye. Revolutions is probably the best of the three, but I don't think it's in English.

HOWEVER, you should certainly go for his earlier work, which is in English. Start with Giants, please!
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Bjorn
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10:22 AM - Nov 29, 2015 #429

Bloß ein Língshān wrote:I'm still confused about Wole. His plays suck. His prospectus on the Nobel website cites his plays as the motivating work for the prize, yet he's categorized in the list of authors as a novelist and poet. What am I to read from this man?
The only work of Soyinka's I've read is Aké, which I quite liked.

I have Le Clézio's Revolutions sitting unread; I keep meaning to get around to it, since I really liked the books of his I read after he got the prize, but so far it just hasn't jumped up and forced me to read it. But it's worth it, then?
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redhead
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4:37 PM - Nov 29, 2015 #430

I have dipped a bit into Le Clezio. Desert was a bore but I really enjoyed The Interrogation (and judging from reviews, I am one of the few who enjoys it in English). Good to hear his other nouveau roman works are worth reading, I'll definitely check Giants out.
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