suzannahhh
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suzannahhh
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October 10th, 2013, 1:03 pm #101

not being a short story lover
I haven't read anytihng of hers either
but
I ordered up her latest book
immediately

and of course I'm always glad
to see a deserving woman honored. . .
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Heteronym
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October 10th, 2013, 2:46 pm #102

I'm still not interested in reading her.
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Cleanthes
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October 10th, 2013, 4:01 pm #103

I can understand why Munro's fiction sounds unappealing to some. Munro's strength lies in the way she deals with content, not form: morals, manners, relationships, life, death, sex. Actual plot, as opposed to the concerns of more formalist, innovative writers, and this is not everyone's cup of tea

That towering mad genius, Szentkuthy, defends the formalist side against the content side particularly well on his Black Renaissance book.
wrote: Over time, all the issues related to myth and philosophy end up as the subject for light movies, and this is not due to intentional derision, nor depravity, nor decadence, nor desire to blaspheme, but due to an intelligent realization. Because sooner or later it is discovered that the so called ancestral, deep, key problems only masked the impotence of small, perverted intellectuals, and that the only possibility to solve them was found in treating them as games.

Life is made up of two parts: unnamed objects, devoid of cause and purpose, and events, ie games. The facts of sex and death either are unimportant, things that exist but lack metaphysics and poetry, anonyma facta et indifferentes, as Pope Sixtus IV wrote, or they are our playthings, useful only to devise a style and provide movie plots, to frivolously use as ornamental and decorative backgrounds. Indifference or pratfall, those are the only choices for reasonable people. The symbolist smuggling of content is something better left to degenerate slaves.

And about form and formalism. I read just yesterday how 'in times of decay form takes precedence over content'. In fact, even a blind man realizes that the opposite is true: the great eras ultimately lack content and are only interested in form. The Baroque artists and petty bourgeois sentimentalist writers would give up even their last drop of blood for their most important, beloved thing: content.
Don't take life so serious, son. It ain't nohow permanent.
?\_(ツ)_/?
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DDR
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DDR
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Joined: September 29th, 2011, 1:16 am

October 10th, 2013, 5:04 pm #104

Heteronym wrote:I'm still not interested in reading her.
I'm with you, not appealing at all. I'm glad that a neglected genre like the short story was finally rewarded, but I'm sure there are better short story writers out there than Munro. I cannot stop thinking this is a Nobel Prize that should have ended in Antonio Tabucchi's persona a few years ago.

To me, Svetlana Alexievich would have been a better choice. She also belongs to a neglected genre (non-fiction) and her themes seems more relevant to depict contemporary human history.
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mandm
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October 10th, 2013, 7:02 pm #105

I like a lot of what I have read by Munro. However, there is a lot of truth in what this reviewer points out about the various formulae she uses.

http://www.lrb.co.uk/v35/n11/christian- ... /poor-rose

I thought The View from Castle Rock was very well done and different from the other stuff I'd read by her.

Overall pleased, but part of that pleasure is an egotistical vindication (while knowing it's all nonsense anyway).

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kline19
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October 10th, 2013, 8:00 pm #106

Hmm... I hope they award it to Laszlo guy at some point in the future.
The love hoarded all your life ... for the work, and his lips still moved silently over that last word - TR
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byrd
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October 10th, 2013, 10:08 pm #107

I haven't read any Munro yet, i've been meaning to for a while, but superficially at least this choice for the Nobel pleases me.
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Funhouse
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October 10th, 2013, 11:15 pm #108

mandm wrote:I like a lot of what I have read by Munro. However, there is a lot of truth in what this reviewer points out about the various formulae she uses.

http://www.lrb.co.uk/v35/n11/christian- ... /poor-rose

I thought The View from Castle Rock was very well done and different from the other stuff I'd read by her.

Overall pleased, but part of that pleasure is an egotistical vindication (while knowing it's all nonsense anyway).
I think The View from Castle Rock is really outstanding. I got it onto the English text list for final year students here in Victoria against opposition from other panel members who said it was too difficult, and I feel really chuffed about that. I hope the Nobel encourages more schools to select it.
?He wishes he had never entered the funhouse. But he has. Then he wishes he were dead. But he's not. Therefore he will construct funhouses for others and be their secret operator--though he would rather be among the lovers for whom funhouses are designed.?
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mandm
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October 11th, 2013, 9:55 am #109

Good for you, it really is excellent.

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John Gargo
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October 11th, 2013, 2:35 pm #110

Who didn't see this coming? :)
wrote:Bret Easton Ellis @BretEastonEllis

Alice Munro was always an overrated writer and now that she's won The Nobel she always will be. The Nobel is a joke and has been for ages...
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