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August 5th, 2012, 8:32 pm #11

DDR wrote:Romania: Although lot of people claimed Müller's prize for Romania, it was evident that despite the inspiration given to Frau Müller's came from Ceaucescu's dictatorship, the language in which se wrote and her Swabian origins made this more German than Romanian. Now they have the chance from now to many years to have a laureate on their own in the person on Mircea Cartarescu. I'm the less indicated to talk about him as I barely have read him, but I find him a very interesting figure in the international literary overview. Probably he is too young now right now at 56 years old, but he's got everything in favor to eventually win the Nobel prize.

Russia: I know everyone will say the Russians have inherited the USSR laureates and literary tradition but reality is that since the Sovietic Union dissolved they haven't have a winner on their own; frankly there hasn't even been a name that sounds strong to get it. The difference from Russia to the other three countries is that I don't see a clear figure that can stand above the rest and have a real chance to be back at the top of the literary establishment. Please feel free to show my ignorance on this field as probably I'm missing a big name in here.
OH! I loved the one novel by Cartarescu that I read. Fantastic, fantastic book. And Björn has been wiping cum stains off his trousers ever since reading the Oribitor books. SO I would be fine with that.


As for Russia, Ada has been pushing this author recently http://w11.zetaboards.com/thefictionalw ... 156/1/#new

What do you think? Too young?
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August 5th, 2012, 8:48 pm #12

DDR wrote:If Europe is the center of the literary world as petulant Birne claims let's stay aside of the big names that always appear and let's focus on four European countries that for some reasons they don't have a laureate so far. Three of them have a good chance for next years as they have very solid writers.
Irony dear Daniel irony :)

nice summary for the Netherlands, Albania and Romania, the mentioned ones are probably really the leading candidates from those countries. At least in Russia Shishkin seems to be the star of the scene already and he has started to gather prizes all over Europe. Also they have already 9 of his books in the nobel library ;)
http://lib.nobelbiblioteket.se/search~S ... 1&1%2C9%2C

I have read the same book as Canox did and found it very good. I have the first part of those Orbitor books somewhere here but have not started yet... I also have Maidenhair by Shishkin but...
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DDR
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DDR
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Joined: September 29th, 2011, 1:16 am

August 5th, 2012, 9:33 pm #13

BirneHelene wrote:
DDR wrote:If Europe is the center of the literary world as petulant Birne claims let's stay aside of the big names that always appear and let's focus on four European countries that for some reasons they don't have a laureate so far. Three of them have a good chance for next years as they have very solid writers.
Irony dear Daniel irony :)

nice summary for the Netherlands, Albania and Romania, the mentioned ones are probably really the leading candidates from those countries. At least in Russia Shishkin seems to be the star of the scene already and he has started to gather prizes all over Europe. Also they have already 9 of his books in the nobel library ;)
http://lib.nobelbiblioteket.se/search~S ... 1&1%2C9%2C

I have read the same book as Canox did and found it very good. I have the first part of those Orbitor books somewhere here but have not started yet... I also have Maidenhair by Shishkin but...
I know my friend, I know :laugh:

I really need to read Nostalgia. It has been on my shelves for over a year and haven't find the right time to do it. I'll try to read it before Nobel announcement this year.
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alliknowis
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alliknowis
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August 6th, 2012, 2:04 am #14

Canox wrote:
DDR wrote:Romania: Although lot of people claimed Müller's prize for Romania, it was evident that despite the inspiration given to Frau Müller's came from Ceaucescu's dictatorship, the language in which se wrote and her Swabian origins made this more German than Romanian. Now they have the chance from now to many years to have a laureate on their own in the person on Mircea Cartarescu. I'm the less indicated to talk about him as I barely have read him, but I find him a very interesting figure in the international literary overview. Probably he is too young now right now at 56 years old, but he's got everything in favor to eventually win the Nobel prize.

Russia: I know everyone will say the Russians have inherited the USSR laureates and literary tradition but reality is that since the Sovietic Union dissolved they haven't have a winner on their own; frankly there hasn't even been a name that sounds strong to get it. The difference from Russia to the other three countries is that I don't see a clear figure that can stand above the rest and have a real chance to be back at the top of the literary establishment. Please feel free to show my ignorance on this field as probably I'm missing a big name in here.
OH! I loved the one novel by Cartarescu that I read. Fantastic, fantastic book. And Björn has been wiping cum stains off his trousers ever since reading the Oribitor books. SO I would be fine with that.


As for Russia, Ada has been pushing this author recently http://w11.zetaboards.com/thefictionalw ... 156/1/#new

What do you think? Too young?
I feel the same way about Cartarescu, he has to be one of the best 5 or 10 writers in the world right now...It may be heresy (pun intended) but i even prefer him to Schulz
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August 6th, 2012, 2:35 am #15

alliknowis wrote:I feel the same way about Cartarescu, he has to be one of the best 5 or 10 writers in the world right now...It may be heresy (pun intended) but i even prefer him to Schulz
I have difficulties placing writers above writers that seem to be an obvious, heavily, shaping influence. I mean, just from that one book I read there are a few obvious ones. kafka, Schulz and Blecher among them. I would add Perutz, but who knows whether he's been translated into Vamplanguage, and I have no idea whether he would have read him. And it's mainly the first story that had a strong Perutz vibe. But yeah, Bruno. So, that always seems having it ass backwards.

What have you read of his? Orbitor has not been completely translated into any language, I think, then there is Nostalgia and Meropi hates Travesty, I think. There isn't an awful lot.

Why would they give it to him this year? Any new book coming out in English/French translation? Any sense of international urgency?
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DDR
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August 6th, 2012, 6:22 am #16

Canox wrote:
alliknowis wrote:
Why would they give it to him this year? Any new book coming out in English/French translation? Any sense of international urgency?
Well, if he wins the Nobel, the level of urgency will increase, trust me. Then we would have some new books coming at the least the next two or three years, probably badly translated. This is one of the authors that we as readers can get a lot if he wins don't you think? It would be a similar situation than what happened with Herta Müller three years ago.
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August 6th, 2012, 6:48 am #17

DDR wrote:Well, if he wins the Nobel, the level of urgency will increase, trust me.
No, no, I meant urgency as a marker of whether he is likely to be nobelised.

I mean, am I wrong in looking at the past years and seeing either way overdue writers like Tranströmer, Pinter or Lessing, very old writers, too (I mean Pinter died within three years of receiving the award), or younger writers like Pamuk and Müller who had just recently-ish published a novel to great acclaim, a book that was widely translated etc. (Snow/Atemschaukel). Cartarescu would fall into the second category age-wise but he would lack the element of momentum, so to say.
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August 6th, 2012, 8:34 am #18

I guess one could say that the speculation season is now officially open with the Literary Saloon jumping on the bandwagon :)
http://www.complete-review.com/saloon/#da4
wrote:the Swedish Academy received 288 valid nominations for this year's prize: 210 names, of which, 46 are first time nominees
Meaning that there are 164 authors in the game (first time nominees are not taken into account according to the 'rules' on the nobel webpage).
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Bjorn
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August 6th, 2012, 8:56 am #19

Isn't the first volume of Orbitor coming out in English this year, or was that early next year?
I did not get into rock'n'roll to play rock'n'roll! (Blixa Bargeld)
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byrd
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August 6th, 2012, 9:07 am #20

For me it's the old white Americans:

Pynchon, Roth, McCarthy.
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