sigma2
Member
Joined: 2:47 PM - Dec 17, 2015

9:47 AM - Sep 04, 2018 #101

Starsky-Tandoori wrote:
academichamilton wrote:
Starsky-Tandoori wrote:
Aubrey The Cat wrote:
Starsky-Tandoori wrote:
Steve69 wrote:
That 'Good Boy' song is horrendous 
Your abhorration ensures its greatness. 
It'll take more than that.
The Kevin Coyne song?
I assumed Steve69 was talking about Idles but I don't know.

The Coyne song is great surely? 
The Idles song is called 'Well Done', the Coyne song is great, definitely. 
A mark of the greatness of Coyne's Good Boy is the cover version by the Nightingales.
Elitist Ponce
Quote
Share

Joined: 2:11 PM - Mar 03, 2009

10:17 AM - Sep 04, 2018 #102

sigma2 wrote:
Starsky-Tandoori wrote:
academichamilton wrote:
Starsky-Tandoori wrote:
Aubrey The Cat wrote:
Starsky-Tandoori wrote:
Steve69 wrote:
That 'Good Boy' song is horrendous 
Your abhorration ensures its greatness. 
It'll take more than that.
The Kevin Coyne song?
I assumed Steve69 was talking about Idles but I don't know.

The Coyne song is great surely? 
The Idles song is called 'Well Done', the Coyne song is great, definitely. 
A mark of the greatness of Coyne's Good Boy is the cover version by the Nightingales.
20 views on youtube. 
My brain is the most complex thing in the Universe. Hiccup said so.

"for the LOLZ!!!!"

'false bravado won't hide the cracks'
Quote
Share

Steve69
Member
Joined: 2:34 PM - Feb 23, 2017

11:19 AM - Sep 04, 2018 #103

academichamilton wrote:
Starsky-Tandoori wrote:
Aubrey The Cat wrote:
Starsky-Tandoori wrote:
Steve69 wrote:
That 'Good Boy' song is horrendous 
Your abhorration ensures its greatness. 
It'll take more than that.
The Kevin Coyne song?
I assumed Steve69 was talking about Idles but I don't know.

The Coyne song is great surely? 
I was not, no.
Quote
Share

Joined: 8:39 PM - Jan 20, 2006

3:56 PM - Sep 04, 2018 #104

Starsky-Tandoori wrote:
academichamilton wrote:
Starsky-Tandoori wrote:
Aubrey The Cat wrote:
Starsky-Tandoori wrote:
Steve69 wrote:
That 'Good Boy' song is horrendous 
Your abhorration ensures its greatness. 
It'll take more than that.
The Kevin Coyne song?
I assumed Steve69 was talking about Idles but I don't know.

The Coyne song is great surely? 
The Idles song is called 'Well Done', the Coyne song is great, definitely. 
Yes, I was getting them mixed up, sorry.

I like Kevin Coyne.
"... a shiftless person, roving and magotie-headed, and sometimes little better than crased."
Quote
Share

Joined: 8:23 AM - Dec 19, 2011

6:18 PM - Sep 04, 2018 #105

Latest LP arrived today and I will be giving it a listen tonight. The cover sticker has:

'The most exciting band in the UK' - Steve Lamacq, BBC 6Music
'One of the most thrilling bands on the planet' - Huw Stephens, Radio 1
'Addressing the rage and promoting the joy' - The Guardian
Scotch cockney cunt
Quote
Share

DeusErac
Member
Joined: 1:24 PM - Jun 21, 2007

7:05 PM - Sep 04, 2018 #106

Righteous Fred wrote: Latest LP arrived today and I will be giving it a listen tonight. The cover sticker has:

'The most exciting band in the UK' - Steve Lamacq, BBC 6Music
'One of the most thrilling bands on the planet' - Huw Stephens, Radio 1
'Addressing the rage and promoting the joy' - The Guardian
Fuck those fucking fuck Idles for fuck's sake . . .

All we ever wanted was sanitary plumbing, straight roads, and a sense of belonging to a community of interest that could reasonably call itself civilized. (Charles Hayward)

jericsmith.com
Quote
Share

Joined: 8:23 AM - Dec 19, 2011

7:24 PM - Sep 04, 2018 #107

DeusErac wrote:
Righteous Fred wrote: Latest LP arrived today and I will be giving it a listen tonight. The cover sticker has:

'The most exciting band in the UK' - Steve Lamacq, BBC 6Music
'One of the most thrilling bands on the planet' - Huw Stephens, Radio 1
'Addressing the rage and promoting the joy' - The Guardian
Fuck those fucking fuck Idles for fuck's sake . . .

😃

Well the album has just finished and my Missus and I agree it is excellent.

We were trying to find comparisons. I suggested Sleaford Mods for lyrics, but definitely not for music: this is a two guitar band. I thought about Slaves for the shouting. 

We agree on the fact that they are 'modern punk' 
Angelic Upstarts for 2018?

We can't wait to see them live in October and listening to this album has done nothing to diminish the anticipation of that.
Scotch cockney cunt
Quote
Share

sigma2
Member
Joined: 2:47 PM - Dec 17, 2015

7:44 PM - Sep 04, 2018 #108

Starsky-Tandoori wrote:
sigma2 wrote: A mark of the greatness of Coyne's Good Boy is the cover version by the Nightingales.
20 views on youtube. 
I'm glad you enjoyed it so much.
Elitist Ponce
Quote
Share

engine
Member
Joined: 10:22 AM - Feb 13, 2014

8:05 PM - Sep 04, 2018 #109

It's still shite !
There is no modern punk !
It's not possible !
I thought you understood that.
It's all a desperate talentless hopeful rehash novelty !
Go buy a fucking Hives Album.    
At least they're funny !
Last edited by engine on 8:26 PM - Sep 04, 2018, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Share

Joined: 7:22 PM - Nov 25, 2012

8:23 PM - Sep 04, 2018 #110

I suppose the comparison with the Angelic Upstarts is just about tenable (raw, shouty / angry rock from the streets with conscious lyrics) but they were never fashion victims, not in a million years and I don't remember any stupid videos either.

I agree with engine that there is no modern punk. Punk is tied to a time (and place up to a point). They are punk-like but not punk.

I have nothing against Idles in fact but the hype around them suggests there is very little competition.
Quote
Share

DeusErac
Member
Joined: 1:24 PM - Jun 21, 2007

8:37 PM - Sep 04, 2018 #111

All we ever wanted was sanitary plumbing, straight roads, and a sense of belonging to a community of interest that could reasonably call itself civilized. (Charles Hayward)

jericsmith.com
Quote
Share

Joined: 2:11 PM - Mar 03, 2009

9:58 PM - Sep 04, 2018 #112

Not a fan of hyperbole either. 
My brain is the most complex thing in the Universe. Hiccup said so.

"for the LOLZ!!!!"

'false bravado won't hide the cracks'
Quote
Share

Joined: 8:23 AM - Dec 19, 2011

10:06 PM - Sep 04, 2018 #113

If you don't get it you don't get it. Fair enough. But...

You do protesteth too much, methinks.

😎
Scotch cockney cunt
Quote
Share

Stranger
Member
Joined: 12:06 PM - Jul 19, 2004

10:17 PM - Sep 04, 2018 #114

Deleted. Wrong thread.
celebrate the music of The Fall, forget the differences!
The stereo Radio Lancs Clitheroe '85 recording...on an official LP from the master tape, please...!
Sheffield Sound City 93 on LP, Nottingham 1987, Glastonbury 2015...too!
the more the merrier...
DON'T BUY VEGETABLES WRAPPED IN PLASTIC...
Quote
Share

HiccupPercy
Member
Joined: 3:19 PM - Feb 27, 2006

11:56 AM - Sep 05, 2018 #115

Stranger wrote: Wrong thread.
Not as wrong as The Idles.
Not my circus, not my monkeys.
Quote
Share

huh
Member
huh
Member
Joined: 12:15 AM - Mar 28, 2007

6:16 PM - Sep 05, 2018 #116

Can't be arsed now to file much of a review of Idles at EOTR, but they were exciting... all the words that have been used already upstairs, visceral, etc, certainly apply.
We bailed out after about half-way, the squash of exhuberent youth in front of the mixing desk a bit too claustrophobia-inducing on a Sunday evening.
But Submission and Danny Nedelko, were pretty triumphant, and there's more of Jason Williamson than i'd realised in the delivery (who i'd noticed having a lurking something of Kevin Coyne and Roger Chapman more recently), and a lot of Killing Joke (and i'm sure i don't need a lot of Killing Joke nowadays).
The kidz loved 'em.

Amongst the points of discussion in this thread, it's interesting to compare the sadness and innocence of Coyne's little explanation at the end of his sublime Whistle Test performance of House on the Hill with an interview by the confidence and certainty of the young men that are the heavily promoted Idles.
Different times.


Quote
Share

Joined: 8:23 AM - Dec 19, 2011

6:34 PM - Sep 05, 2018 #117



My favourite KC
Scotch cockney cunt
Quote
Share

Joined: 7:22 PM - Nov 25, 2012

7:14 PM - Sep 05, 2018 #118

huh wrote: Can't be arsed now to file much of a review of Idles at EOTR, but they were exciting... all the words that have been used already upstairs, visceral, etc, certainly apply.
We bailed out after about half-way, the squash of exhuberent youth in front of the mixing desk a bit too claustrophobia-inducing on a Sunday evening.
But Submission and Danny Nedelko, were pretty triumphant, and there's more of Jason Williamson than i'd realised in the delivery (who i'd noticed having a lurking something of Kevin Coyne and Roger Chapman more recently), and a lot of Killing Joke (and i'm sure i don't need a lot of Killing Joke nowadays).
The kidz loved 'em.

Amongst the points of discussion in this thread, it's interesting to compare the sadness and innocence of Coyne's little explanation at the end of his sublime Whistle Test performance of House on the Hill with an interview by the confidence and certainty of the young men that are the heavily promoted Idles.
Different times.


That is a fantastic Coyne piece. Great playing all round in fact.

I managed about 5 secs of Idles inane 'banter'. I dunno must be getting old, they're just annoying and arch (and covered in pathetic tattoos). Coyne comes across as just totally genuine (and properly talented) but then I do think that was a lot easier in 1973. It would take some serious effort not to get drawn into the vapid, self-promoting bullshit that is so ubiquitous today.
Quote
Share

huh
Member
huh
Member
Joined: 12:15 AM - Mar 28, 2007

8:32 PM - Sep 05, 2018 #119

academichamilton wrote:
huh wrote: Can't be arsed now to file much of a review of Idles at EOTR, but they were exciting... all the words that have been used already upstairs, visceral, etc, certainly apply.
We bailed out after about half-way, the squash of exhuberent youth in front of the mixing desk a bit too claustrophobia-inducing on a Sunday evening.
But Submission and Danny Nedelko, were pretty triumphant, and there's more of Jason Williamson than i'd realised in the delivery (who i'd noticed having a lurking something of Kevin Coyne and Roger Chapman more recently), and a lot of Killing Joke (and i'm sure i don't need a lot of Killing Joke nowadays).
The kidz loved 'em.

Amongst the points of discussion in this thread, it's interesting to compare the sadness and innocence of Coyne's little explanation at the end of his sublime Whistle Test performance of House on the Hill with an interview by the confidence and certainty of the young men that are the heavily promoted Idles.
Different times.
That is a fantastic Coyne piece. Great playing all round in fact.

I managed about 5 secs of Idles inane 'banter'. I dunno must be getting old, they're just annoying and arch (and covered in pathetic tattoos). Coyne comes across as just totally genuine (and properly talented) but then I do think that was a lot easier in 1973. It would take some serious effort not to get drawn into the vapid, self-promoting bullshit that is so ubiquitous today.
My words seem to have tripped over themelves at the end of my post there, i meant their confidence and certainty... but the contrast is the striking thing, Coyne was very often a wreck live, not intendedly i think but because of his 'proclivities'. I remember, and it's not apocryphal, that he actually was tripping when he played at Hyde Park in 1974 or whenever it was... i saw him several times and he was always completely convincing; it was almost disturbing the way he seemed to feel it so much.

One of the best and most interesting bits of EOTR for me was a talk by Ian Marchant, who's written a sort of ragged history of 'the counter culture'; he makes a good argument for when it began and ended: 1956, and 1994, with the arrival of Blair. Especially important is his point about how you loved bands and music in the 70s because no-one else knew about it... "No one has heard of them" was a mark of commendation. It really was. Now it's all over the place instantly, and all over almost as quickly.
Quote
Share

Joined: 2:11 PM - Mar 03, 2009

8:48 PM - Sep 05, 2018 #120

Cos of the internet.
My brain is the most complex thing in the Universe. Hiccup said so.

"for the LOLZ!!!!"

'false bravado won't hide the cracks'
Quote
Share

Steve69
Member
Joined: 2:34 PM - Feb 23, 2017

10:41 PM - Sep 05, 2018 #121

huh wrote: Can't be arsed now to file much of a review of Idles at EOTR, but they were exciting... all the words that have been used already upstairs, visceral, etc, certainly apply.
We bailed out after about half-way, the squash of exhuberent youth in front of the mixing desk a bit too claustrophobia-inducing on a Sunday evening.
But Submission and Danny Nedelko, were pretty triumphant, and there's more of Jason Williamson than i'd realised in the delivery (who i'd noticed having a lurking something of Kevin Coyne and Roger Chapman more recently), and a lot of Killing Joke (and i'm sure i don't need a lot of Killing Joke nowadays).
The kidz loved 'em.

Amongst the points of discussion in this thread, it's interesting to compare the sadness and innocence of Coyne's little explanation at the end of his sublime Whistle Test performance of House on the Hill with an interview by the confidence and certainty of the young men that are the heavily promoted Idles.
Different times.


  • I have to confess that I'd never heard of Kevin Coyne until this thread
  • I've been back and listened to 'Good Boy' again, and I really don't see the appeal at all: it's disturbingly awful and also becomes boring very quickly
  • The 'House on the Hill' clip is a whole different kettle of fish; some seriously moving vocals, e.g. at 2:40 ('money') and 4:13 ('funny'), and the slide guitar is hesitant and fractured in a really quite endearing way. I really enjoyed this clip
  • I made it through about one minute of The Idles clip; what a pair of utter bellends. Horrifically embarrassing 😒 
  • I listened to NEVER FIGHT A MAN WITH A PERM - leaving aside the title, which is just trying far too hard, it's a mish-mash of Sleaford Mods (who are bloody awful anyway) and McClusky and any number of other vaguely punkish bands. Uninspired and pointless.
Quote
Share

sigma2
Member
Joined: 2:47 PM - Dec 17, 2015

11:13 PM - Sep 05, 2018 #122

huh wrote:One of the best and most interesting bits of EOTR for me was a talk by Ian Marchant, who's written a sort of ragged history of 'the counter culture'; he makes a good argument for when it began and ended: 1956, and 1994, with the arrival of Blair. Especially important is his point about how you loved bands and music in the 70s because no-one else knew about it... "No one has heard of them" was a mark of commendation. It really was. Now it's all over the place instantly, and all over almost as quickly.
Go on then, you've got me curious, how did Blair kill the counter culture, as well as all his other achievements/crimes?
Elitist Ponce
Quote
Share

Joined: 8:39 PM - Jan 20, 2006

6:38 AM - Sep 06, 2018 #123

sigma2 wrote:
huh wrote:One of the best and most interesting bits of EOTR for me was a talk by Ian Marchant, who's written a sort of ragged history of 'the counter culture'; he makes a good argument for when it began and ended: 1956, and 1994, with the arrival of Blair. Especially important is his point about how you loved bands and music in the 70s because no-one else knew about it... "No one has heard of them" was a mark of commendation. It really was. Now it's all over the place instantly, and all over almost as quickly.
Go on then, you've got me curious, how did Blair kill the counter culture, as well as all his other achievements/crimes?
"Cool Britannia" and the rest.
"... a shiftless person, roving and magotie-headed, and sometimes little better than crased."
Quote
Share

huh
Member
huh
Member
Joined: 12:15 AM - Mar 28, 2007

6:42 AM - Sep 06, 2018 #124

sigma2 wrote:
huh wrote:One of the best and most interesting bits of EOTR for me was a talk by Ian Marchant, who's written a sort of ragged history of 'the counter culture'; he makes a good argument for when it began and ended: 1956, and 1994, with the arrival of Blair. Especially important is his point about how you loved bands and music in the 70s because no-one else knew about it... "No one has heard of them" was a mark of commendation. It really was. Now it's all over the place instantly, and all over almost as quickly.
Go on then, you've got me curious, how did Blair kill the counter culture, as well as all his other achievements/crimes?
Not an exact science i'm sure, and it's his argument not mine, but here's a screen shot from the intro to his book orf Amazon's preview.



Amend: yes, Aubrey, that image of Noel and Tone could be the defining moment (albeit 3 years after Marchant's date) and whether he was 'on' coke or not...
Quote
Share

Joined: 7:22 PM - Nov 25, 2012

9:00 AM - Sep 06, 2018 #125

huh wrote:
sigma2 wrote:
huh wrote:One of the best and most interesting bits of EOTR for me was a talk by Ian Marchant, who's written a sort of ragged history of 'the counter culture'; he makes a good argument for when it began and ended: 1956, and 1994, with the arrival of Blair. Especially important is his point about how you loved bands and music in the 70s because no-one else knew about it... "No one has heard of them" was a mark of commendation. It really was. Now it's all over the place instantly, and all over almost as quickly.
Go on then, you've got me curious, how did Blair kill the counter culture, as well as all his other achievements/crimes?
Not an exact science i'm sure, and it's his argument not mine, but here's a screen shot from the intro to his book orf Amazon's preview.



Amend: yes, Aubrey, that image of Noel and Tone could be the defining moment (albeit 3 years after Marchant's date) and whether he was 'on' coke or not...
Interesting. Would you say that any counter-culture must first come from the youth? The only way I could see such a thing being any kind of force again today, would be if it was entirely 'offline'. Somehow that seems impossible though, especially amongst the young.
Quote
Share