QMU, Glasgow

QMU, Glasgow

mcclarky
Member
Joined: 17 Mar 2010, 21:53

04 Nov 2017, 23:54 #1

Gulp. Just back to hotel. What a gig. Brilliant from start to finish. Hard to put into words how good that was. If that’s the last time I see them they are the ultimate band. MES even knob twiddling from the wheelchair at 1 point. He was on stage for just about all the main set and then singing from off for the encore. Great night.
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johncoan
Member
Joined: 18 Jun 2004, 23:12

04 Nov 2017, 23:58 #2

Started a bit shaky, bad sound and poor song choice. But around the fourth song something kicked in and it was very good with some real highlights for the remainder.

Tell you what I've never been too fussed about, and which KICKED ARSE tonight - 'First One Today'. Excellent!

Mark looked grumpy and his vocals were mostly sort of muddy, but he was fine. He disappeared after 40 minutes. Keiron was fucking AWESOME. Pam popped up a couple of times wearing the most fabulous silver coat, adding percussion and backing vocs.

Good fun. The place was fucking heaving and I managed to sit down upstairs but it was pitch black.

And good fucking Christ were they LOUD....or am I just getting old?
be-boxed focken clown
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Ray
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Ray
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Joined: 21 Sep 2006, 11:35

05 Nov 2017, 00:37 #3

Brief thoughts:

Brutal, bruising, metallic.

MES on fine, strong vocal form.

Kieron seemed a mite fed up at the end.

The best tunes were the ones with more subtlety, light and shade - Blindness (deliciously slurpy keyboard break by Michael Clapham), Groundsboy, and particularly the sublime Dedication, which was like some kind of spectral juggernaut.

The blind reversing of the wheelchair towards, and almost into, Dave Spurr was quite amusing: MES wondering why he couldn't proceed any further, then looking around behind him - "ah!" ...

MES singing from offstage for the last two songs of the set - 2014 (all shape smashed out of it) and Bury (Clapham's comedy keys made it a trifle unsteady/unsteady trifle), and the encore Stout Man (Cock In My Pocket).

Big hand to Dave who I thought was really excellent on the bass. The last couple of gigs I have seen (last year and this) he really seems to be coming into his own. He is really pinging and mangling it, making even the dullest lines sound sparkling. By contrast, Pete makes dull lines sound dull or duller ... In fact, I thought tonight that I'd really like to hear The Fall as MES, Dave - in plenty of space to boom, a lithe but powerful drummer (less bashy and crashy), and some occasional sparse whistling instead of the guitar parts. Just a smidge of keys.
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johncoan
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Joined: 18 Jun 2004, 23:12

05 Nov 2017, 00:43 #4

Ray @ Nov 5 2017, 12:37 PM wrote:

Kieron seemed a mite fed up at the end.
What makes you say that?
be-boxed focken clown
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Dead Seminal
Member
Joined: 01 Aug 2011, 10:32

05 Nov 2017, 02:01 #5

johncoan @ Nov 5 2017, 12:43 PM wrote:
Ray @ Nov 5 2017, 12:37 PM wrote:

Kieron seemed a mite fed up at the end.
What makes you say that?
You were supposed to be there arsewipe, what did you think of it ?
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dannyno
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dannyno
Moderator
Joined: 11 May 2004, 15:28

05 Nov 2017, 08:24 #6


Note: some reviews merged into this thread from the gig discussion thread.

Dan


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hotrunes
Member
Joined: 25 May 2005, 09:13

05 Nov 2017, 09:13 #7

Ray @ Nov 5 2017, 12:37 PM wrote: Brief thoughts:

Brutal, bruising, metallic.

MES on fine, strong vocal form.

Kieron seemed a mite fed up at the end.

The best tunes were the ones with more subtlety, light and shade - Blindness (deliciously slurpy keyboard break by Michael Clapham), Groundsboy, and particularly the sublime Dedication, which was like some kind of spectral juggernaut.

The blind reversing of the wheelchair towards, and almost into, Dave Spurr was quite amusing: MES wondering why he couldn't proceed any further, then looking around behind him - "ah!" ...

MES singing from offstage for the last two songs of the set - 2014 (all shape smashed out of it) and Bury (Clapham's comedy keys made it a trifle unsteady/unsteady trifle), and the encore Stout Man (Cock In My Pocket).

Big hand to Dave who I thought was really excellent on the bass. The last couple of gigs I have seen (last year and this) he really seems to be coming into his own. He is really pinging and mangling it, making even the dullest lines sound sparkling. By contrast, Pete makes dull lines sound dull or duller ... In fact, I thought tonight that I'd really like to hear The Fall as MES, Dave - in plenty of space to boom, a lithe but powerful drummer (less bashy and crashy), and some occasional sparse whistling instead of the guitar parts. Just a smidge of keys.
I share strongly Ray's overall impressions - well expressed - with the exception that I like Greenway's guitar. This was a great gig, and it was just wonderful to see MES on such commanding form. To me the vocals have not sounded clearer, sharper, or more focused for years (this may have been aided by my being immediately behind the mixing desk), and a good portion of his normal physicality was returned to the stage, which injects something indescribable but vital to the atmosphere and sound. Where at Wakefield he had seemed a little stranded mid-stage, last night he was prowling around as much as the wheelchair would allow, and using his right arm much more ('your arms limp at your side' was an altogether less poignant line, in a good way).

It's true that the group have never been tighter. Kieron and Dave in particular really seem to be enjoying playing together, and Clapham is tentatively beginning to make his presence felt on keyboards, the best bits being where it adds a bit of fall-style chaotic jumble to the linear assault. Dave's bass-work has got more experimental and accomplished (he also seems to get more handsome every time, so something's going on there).

But they have also never been more rock or muso, which I'm not wholly comfortable with - and the cymbal heavy assault and big rock endings is hard on the ears. The best parts of the set for me, like Ray, were when they stripped it back a bit and reined it in. The new Blindness, with its sparse guitar decoration, was compelling and majestic, and even though it gets huge in due course, the build works. Mark's vocal on this was wonderful (and we learned that the poster asking 'do you work hard' had a Sheffield accent). Similarly, it was the most restrained and effective Dedication that I have seen. But the absolute surprise highlight was Groundsboy, which laid down a simple shuffle beat and felt like family party time on the porch, with Pam joining in on shiny jacket, drumsticks and 'chicka-chicka' backing vox, and MES dead centre and tweaking the mood with his enunciation. The group were clearly busking it, and their communication through this track showed just how comfortable they are playing together; though Kieron misread MES' intention and tried to bring it back up for another rock ending (enough said...). Unlike Ray, I didn't perceive that Kieron was pissed-off at the end of set, unless it was when he was marched back on for Stout Man before he had time to change his sweat-drenched shirt.

Weirdly, I reckon I would have enjoyed it even more if it had ended at Auto-Chip; I didn't really need Bury and Stout Man with MES off-stage - though they were fine - as it's a lot less interesting when he's not fully there. On this evidence, though, he's on the mend, and maybe even taking better care of himself than ever, or maybe just taking steroids; whatever, another great gig in Glasgow.
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the27points
Member
Joined: 01 Feb 2011, 16:54

05 Nov 2017, 10:08 #8

Wolf Kidult Man
Over! Over!
Fallsound
Blindness
Brillo de Facto
First One Today
Dedication Not Medication
Fol de Rol
Groundsboy
Second House Now
New Facts Emerge - MES leaves the stage
Auto-Chip 2014
Bury

Encore: Stout Man
Cut-Out Craig
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Ray
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Ray
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Joined: 21 Sep 2006, 11:35

05 Nov 2017, 11:32 #9

johncoan @ Nov 5 2017, 12:43 AM wrote:
Ray @ Nov 5 2017, 12:37 PM wrote:

Kieron seemed a mite fed up at the end.
What makes you say that?
Just the way he slammed his sticks down and got straight up and left at the end of Bury; then marched back out for Stout In My Pocket (Cock Man). I may be misinterpreting it, but even if not, it's probably nuthin'.
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Ray
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Ray
Member
Joined: 21 Sep 2006, 11:35

05 Nov 2017, 11:39 #10

hotrunes @ Nov 5 2017, 09:13 AM wrote: To me the vocals have not sounded clearer, sharper, or more focused for years
I thought at one point, when he began proclaiming/declaiming at a higher pitch, that he sounded (just for a bit) like his much younger self (... which I suppose - in some ways, anyroad - he still is).
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mezuzah man
Member
Joined: 30 Dec 2010, 20:54

05 Nov 2017, 12:07 #11

Groundsboy is up. Thanks Angela Herriot x
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kbwF1EB-u5o
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Joined: 31 Aug 2004, 15:24

05 Nov 2017, 12:43 #12

mezuzah man @ Nov 5 2017, 12:07 PM wrote: Groundsboy is up. Thanks Angela Herriot x
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kbwF1EB-u5o
Did anyone get any footage of Pam doing some juggling in the middle of Blindness? :D
Not everyone's cup of tea.
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gappy tooth
Member
Joined: 13 Jun 2003, 11:23

05 Nov 2017, 13:51 #13

mezuzah man @ Nov 6 2017, 12:07 AM wrote: Groundsboy is up. Thanks Angela Herriot x
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kbwF1EB-u5o
A little snippet of "I've Been Everywhere" at the end - bet that's on Mark's 20 Truckin' Greats record.
Good Vi-b-b-b-b-b-b-b-b-bratio-xx
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Slushy Pen
Member
Joined: 18 Apr 2016, 07:37

05 Nov 2017, 14:21 #14

Thanks for the Groundsboy vid.

He’s definitely improving, foots tapping away and he’s moving around. Good times ahead.
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misterrogers
Member
Joined: 07 May 2007, 00:35

05 Nov 2017, 17:36 #15

I hear ya..

Thanks for the reports and video

I’m hearing the words cracking, etc..

I just ..contrary to everyone else...don’t dig the tune,,...did they get any others?
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sigma2
Member
Joined: 17 Dec 2015, 14:47

05 Nov 2017, 18:08 #16

The Fall at Queen Margaret Union, Glasgow: a triumphant portrait of courage and commitment

5 November 2017 • 4:23pm

By Peter Ross

Hunched in a wheelchair, right arm in a sling, face bloated and bearded, Mark E Smith sang-spat a repeated phrase – “I think it’s over now, I think it’s ending” – as his sidemen locked into a brutal riff. This sounded valedictory, and a question hovered in the air: could we be witnessing the last days of The Fall, a band that for 40 years has belched like a dirty chimney through the drab skies of British culture?

Recent signs have been worrying. In August, following a cancelled run of US shows, official statements explained that Smith had been hospitalised due to problems with his throat, mouth and respiratory system. In a moment of black farce, on his 60th birthday, the BBC mistakenly announced his death.

Fan reaction to his appearance has been a swirling of sorrow and admiration. Some aficionados chose not to attend this concert as they would have found it upsetting to see their hero so obviously unwell. Yet Smith’s demeanour and performance during this hour-long set suggested the opposite view: that he is demonstrating courage and commitment to his work; these shows should not be regretted as a tragic spectacle but cherished as portraits of defiance and endurance.

As the band’s manager had posted on Instagram: “Mark lives for music, and yes, physically he looked messed up… but don’t forget about mind and heart and soul. Everything inside. He needed to do this.”

The first four songs had astonishing attack and intensity, Dave Spurr’s forceful bass performing CPR on the front row. Smith had begun singing the opener, Wolf Kidult Man, from the wings, rising up behind a speaker stack on a wheelchair lift and then wheeled centre-stage to cheers and raised fists. It didn’t feel awkward or pitiable, it felt triumphant, a grand entrance, pure James Brown, the godfather of dole.

He was a compelling presence, crooning and barking into two microphones, rolling back and forth during the juggernaut groove of Blindness. He never spoke to the sell-out crowd, acknowledged no applause. Even when the music was at its most furious, he maintained a regal blankness, checking his nails.

Smith went off after 40 minutes and sang the final four songs out of sight. Inevitably, much of the potency was lost, but the message was clear: if he is to leave the public stage, it will be on his terms and at a time of his choosing.

.........................................................................................................
Well I wasn't there, but that's a pretty good review from the Telegraph of all places. Their cultural coverage beats their politics anyway.
Elitist Ponce
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the27points
Member
Joined: 01 Feb 2011, 16:54

05 Nov 2017, 18:52 #17

sigma2 @ Nov 6 2017, 06:08 AM wrote: Smith went off after 40 minutes and sang the final four songs out of sight.
He left the stage just before 10:30pm, I reckon he was on stage for more like 50-60 minutes.
Cut-Out Craig
Tear carefully along dotted line
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the27points
Member
Joined: 01 Feb 2011, 16:54

05 Nov 2017, 18:56 #18

sigma2 @ Nov 6 2017, 06:08 AM wrote: He never spoke to the sell-out crowd, acknowledged no applause.
I think there was a "Thank you" as he left the stage at the beginning of NFE.
Cut-Out Craig
Tear carefully along dotted line
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Joined: 19 Sep 2013, 21:51

05 Nov 2017, 23:18 #19

sigma2 @ Nov 6 2017, 06:08 AM wrote: The Fall at Queen Margaret Union, Glasgow: a triumphant portrait of courage and commitment

5 November 2017 • 4:23pm

By Peter Ross

Hunched in a wheelchair, right arm in a sling, face bloated and bearded, Mark E Smith sang-spat a repeated phrase – “I think it’s over now, I think it’s ending” – as his sidemen locked into a brutal riff. This sounded valedictory, and a question hovered in the air: could we be witnessing the last days of The Fall, a band that for 40 years has belched like a dirty chimney through the drab skies of British culture?

Recent signs have been worrying. In August, following a cancelled run of US shows, official statements explained that Smith had been hospitalised due to problems with his throat, mouth and respiratory system. In a moment of black farce, on his 60th birthday, the BBC mistakenly announced his death.

Fan reaction to his appearance has been a swirling of sorrow and admiration. Some aficionados chose not to attend this concert as they would have found it upsetting to see their hero so obviously unwell. Yet Smith’s demeanour and performance during this hour-long set suggested the opposite view: that he is demonstrating courage and commitment to his work; these shows should not be regretted as a tragic spectacle but cherished as portraits of defiance and endurance.

As the band’s manager had posted on Instagram: “Mark lives for music, and yes, physically he looked messed up… but don’t forget about mind and heart and soul. Everything inside. He needed to do this.”

The first four songs had astonishing attack and intensity, Dave Spurr’s forceful bass performing CPR on the front row. Smith had begun singing the opener, Wolf Kidult Man, from the wings, rising up behind a speaker stack on a wheelchair lift and then wheeled centre-stage to cheers and raised fists. It didn’t feel awkward or pitiable, it felt triumphant, a grand entrance, pure James Brown, the godfather of dole.

He was a compelling presence, crooning and barking into two microphones, rolling back and forth during the juggernaut groove of Blindness. He never spoke to the sell-out crowd, acknowledged no applause. Even when the music was at its most furious, he maintained a regal blankness, checking his nails.

Smith went off after 40 minutes and sang the final four songs out of sight. Inevitably, much of the potency was lost, but the message was clear: if he is to leave the public stage, it will be on his terms and at a time of his choosing.

.........................................................................................................
Well I wasn't there, but that's a pretty good review from the Telegraph of all places. Their cultural coverage beats their politics anyway.
Beautiful.
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Pott
Member
Pott
Member
Joined: 21 Sep 2006, 13:48

06 Nov 2017, 00:13 #20

When are we getting 'Fit and Working Again' on the setlist?
I'm not that type of wanker.
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Philh
Member
Joined: 07 Sep 2006, 22:38

06 Nov 2017, 00:34 #21

Fair point. What about this new stuff Pam mentioned? I’m ready.
He was the best man I never met.
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Joined: 09 Mar 2011, 08:15

06 Nov 2017, 08:00 #22

Not a fan of the phrase "the godfather of dole" pissweak
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johncoan
Member
Joined: 18 Jun 2004, 23:12

06 Nov 2017, 09:18 #23

it's better than 'mnemonic cover version'
be-boxed focken clown
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the27points
Member
Joined: 01 Feb 2011, 16:54

06 Nov 2017, 11:20 #24

johncoan @ Nov 5 2017, 11:58 AM wrote: The place was fucking heaving and I managed to sit down upstairs but it was pitch black.
We got seats upstairs too, but it was so dark up in that balcony, my wife couldn't see where the steps were and fell down them :grrr:
Cut-Out Craig
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the27points
Member
Joined: 01 Feb 2011, 16:54

06 Nov 2017, 11:47 #25

Some blurry photos taken from the back row of the balcony

Blindness



Amp twiddling



Groundsboy
Cut-Out Craig
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