Pott
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10:59 PM - May 07, 2017 #1501

Grease For Roads @ Sep 2 2016, 01:54 PM wrote:

In the garden earlier. Are pigeons' eggs any good or should I wait for the babies?
Baby pigeon, aka Squab, be good eatin'
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7:07 AM - May 08, 2017 #1502

Pott @ May 7 2017, 11:59 PM wrote:
Grease For Roads @ Sep 2 2016, 01:54 PM wrote:

In the garden earlier.  Are pigeons' eggs any good or should I wait for the babies?
Baby pigeon, aka Squab, be good eatin'
A Worried Man,Apr 25 2017, 12:18 AM

"GFR is being a prick."
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9:45 PM - May 10, 2017 #1503

A Worried Man @ May 7 2017, 08:04 PM wrote: Close encounter with a couple of young badgers this evening.



(I know that is only one. I couldn't get them both in the same shot)

I've had it happen a couple of times before, they can't see a thing so if you stay still and the wind is in the right direction they can get right on top of you before they notice you. But when they have noticed me before they have shot off sharpish.

I've never know them to be so entirely unconcerned with my presence. They'd get close, sniff the air when they released something was there and wander off slowly in the opposite direction for a bit, before wandering back. I think I could still be there now if the flies were not eating me alive.
Self Portrait with Badgers, by Sodoma:


"... a shiftless person, roving and magotie-headed, and sometimes little better than crased."
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Pott
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8:42 AM - May 11, 2017 #1504

The swallows arrived yesterday, some settled, some seemed intent on heading further north.
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A Worried Man
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8:30 PM - May 12, 2017 #1505

Saw some myself a few days ago, always cheering that.

I've been back to visit my new friends the badgers a few times since. Been reading up on them as well. There is a big set deeper in the wood by which I saw an adult badger, briefly- more wary than the young badgers I saw last week.

I had to scarper one evening- it is a private wood, and I heard some people walking a dog and I didn't know if they were fellow trespassers or someone connected with the owners. (I know it is a private wood because once I met a man with a gun there who told me it is private wood. I didn't argue.) I read in the local paper that the police are investigating an incident there where some people lit a fire and fucked up a bridge in the wood, so it wouldn't surprise me if a big fence goes up around it, ruining it for reasonably respectful trespassers.
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Snowy
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3:26 PM - Aug 03, 2017 #1506

I looked out of the window earlier and was stunned to see a buzzard on the back lawn with some prey in its claws. I went towards the window to get a better look at it but it took off into the copse behind the house with what looked like a rat in its claws (it was a large rodent going by how it struggled a bit to get airborne).

How bizarre! We live in suburbia with just Lydiard Park nearby in terms of open ground which doesn't really support the food sources for this sort of bird of prey, I would have thought.

:confused:


See ya mate. Yeah, see ya mate

Next Halt Mürren. End Station. Bitte Alle Austeigen

Bone idle c**t
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Pott
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4:15 PM - Aug 03, 2017 #1507

Buzzards used to be a rare sight, but their numbers have grown hugely in recent years. I imagine they roam widely and they're a common enough sight in the Cotswolds.

Expect to see Red Kites moving into cities soon. In mediaeval times they were something of a pest in London and there's no reason they shouldn't return. They're scavengers so don't need live prey. The best place to see them at the moment is the service station at Oxford on the M40 where they congregate for all the discarded fast food.

http://www.independent.co.uk/environmen ... 11922.html
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Snowy
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5:07 PM - Aug 03, 2017 #1508

Red kites are quite a frequent sight if you drive along the M4 near Reading too. I see them hovering most times I go that way.


See ya mate. Yeah, see ya mate

Next Halt Mürren. End Station. Bitte Alle Austeigen

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A Worried Man
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6:32 PM - Sep 16, 2017 #1509

Depressed to learn that the badger cull has been extended for another year (it was supposed to only last 4 years) and also will take place in new areas. It seems I am probably on the edge of a new cull area. It seems such a triumph of dogma over evidence :banghead:
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6:37 PM - Sep 16, 2017 #1510

A Worried Man @ Sep 16 2017, 07:32 PM wrote: Depressed to learn that the badger cull has been extended for another year (it was supposed to only last  4 years) and also will take place in new areas. It seems I am probably on the edge of a new cull area. It seems such a triumph of dogma over evidence  :banghead:
Is yours a popular view where you live, AWM?
"... a shiftless person, roving and magotie-headed, and sometimes little better than crased."
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A Worried Man
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6:45 PM - Sep 16, 2017 #1511

I honestly don't know. I was alerted to it by a poster someone had put up so there are people who are against it.

I have had a couple of conversation where people have gone "what about the farmers" and you say that the evidence isn't there that this will help and they have sort of gone quiet like they can't process that. But one of those conversations was with my brother in law who can be a massive bellend.
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1:23 PM - Sep 19, 2017 #1512

Have had a thing for estuaries ever since a science teacher told me they were super imortant for the planet. Round my home many were "reclaimed"
There is one close to me now and over the years the chemistry in it has fascinated me. It gets quite effervescent and colourful. So I'm spending lots of time very stoned staring at the mud and taking photos. with every tide something it's cooked up out of greenhouse gasses is served up to the planet.












argle bargle fargle
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3:58 PM - Sep 19, 2017 #1513

Totales Plebeian @ Sep 19 2017, 02:23 PM wrote: Have had a thing for estuaries ever since a science teacher told me they were super imortant for the planet. Round my home many were "reclaimed"
There is one close to me now and over the years the chemistry in it has fascinated me. It gets quite effervescent and colourful. So I'm spending lots of time very stoned staring at the mud and taking photos. with every tide something it's cooked up out of greenhouse gasses is served up to the planet.
To make sure we ate the most intelligent herring, he fished the
estuary. He planted a notice: "Literate herring, this way" below the
waterline, at the corner where it met the sea. The paint for the notice
was made of crushed heads. Red-eyed herring (sore from reading) would
round the corner, read the notice, and sense the estuary water, bland
and eye-easing. A few feet brought them within the confining
friendliness of his manila net... and a purposeful end.
(Ivor Cutler)
"... a shiftless person, roving and magotie-headed, and sometimes little better than crased."
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4:04 PM - Sep 19, 2017 #1514

Gorgeous!
argle bargle fargle
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HiccupPercy
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4:52 PM - Sep 19, 2017 #1515

I like those pictures, which estuary?
Not my circus, not my monkeys.
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5:00 PM - Sep 19, 2017 #1516

HiccupPercy @ Sep 20 2017, 04:52 AM wrote: I like those pictures, which estuary?
I'm at the mouth of otago harbour in nz. Aramoana.
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A Worried Man
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7:12 PM - Jan 29, 2018 #1517

Look at this slightly unsettling film of how a kingfisher keeps its head still while hunting.

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7:29 PM - Jan 29, 2018 #1518

A Worried Man wrote: Look at this slightly unsettling film of how a kingfisher keeps its head still while hunting.

That is great. Only seen a kingfisher a handful of times and always as that lightning flash of electric blue.
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A Worried Man
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7:45 PM - Jan 29, 2018 #1519

I've seen them a few times, mainly just that flash but once or twice I've been lucky enough to watch them hunting for a few minutes.
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Snowy
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9:26 PM - Jan 29, 2018 #1520

I've only seen a kingfisher a couple of times, and always near the Avoncliff aqueduct. I managed to get a shot of the last one I saw. (magifying glass required)



See ya mate. Yeah, see ya mate

Next Halt Mürren. End Station. Bitte Alle Austeigen

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Snowy
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10:43 AM - Jun 15, 2018 #1521



Came across this yesterday afternoon hanging at head height from a sapling. Which type of moth is responsible I wonder? Any experts here?


See ya mate. Yeah, see ya mate

Next Halt Mürren. End Station. Bitte Alle Austeigen

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DeusErac
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11:19 AM - Jun 15, 2018 #1522

Snowy wrote:
If you were in U.S., I'd say it was these guys with some confidence: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_tent_caterpillar . . . . is the sapling a fruit tree? They're particularly fond of those . . .

I can't ascertain if they're native out of North America, though there are closely related tent caterpillars that are resident in Eurasia.

They can defoliate and kill a little tree pretty quickly. We used to get them a lot on our property in New York . . . . spraying their nests with a mixture of soapy water and vegetable oil is an effective way to wipe them out without hurting your tree or plants beneath it.
All we ever wanted was sanitary plumbing, straight roads, and a sense of belonging to a community of interest that could reasonably call itself civilized. (Charles Hayward)

jericsmith.com
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Snowy
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12:59 PM - Jun 15, 2018 #1523

DeusErac wrote:
Snowy wrote:
If you were in U.S., I'd say it was these guys with some confidence: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eastern_tent_caterpillar . . . . is the sapling a fruit tree? They're particularly fond of those . . .

I can't ascertain if they're native out of North America, though there are closely related tent caterpillars that are resident in Eurasia.

They can defoliate and kill a little tree pretty quickly. We used to get them a lot on our property in New York . . . . spraying their nests with a mixture of soapy water and vegetable oil is an effective way to wipe them out without hurting your tree or plants beneath it.
Apparently it’s a Small Eggar moth. A number of people confirmed this on a Uk wildlife Facebook site after I asked the question there.

Quite a rare species now apparently.

https://ukmoths.org.uk/species/eriogaster-lanestris/


See ya mate. Yeah, see ya mate

Next Halt Mürren. End Station. Bitte Alle Austeigen

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DeusErac
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2:45 PM - Jun 15, 2018 #1524

Snowy wrote: Apparently it’s a Small Eggar moth. A number of people confirmed this on a Uk wildlife Facebook site after I asked the question there.

Quite a rare species now apparently.

https://ukmoths.org.uk/species/eriogaster-lanestris/
Huh!! Very cool . . . we don't usually think of potential pest species being endangered that way . . .
All we ever wanted was sanitary plumbing, straight roads, and a sense of belonging to a community of interest that could reasonably call itself civilized. (Charles Hayward)

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2:48 PM - Jun 15, 2018 #1525

Snowy wrote:

Quite a rare species now apparently.

No shortage of them there though, what?
"... a shiftless person, roving and magotie-headed, and sometimes little better than crased."
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