Mark E Smith - tributes and obituaries (working on first post index)

sigma2
Member
Joined: 17 Dec 2015, 14:47

31 Jan 2018, 00:50 #451

error
Elitist Ponce
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Joined: 03 Mar 2009, 14:11

31 Jan 2018, 08:56 #452

rainmaster wrote:
Starsky-Tandoori wrote: A Fall Online Forum tribute, made in 2011. Hex Enduction Ours. 


  

hex-enduction-ours-t29367.html

https://www.reverbnation.com/fofthefall ... orum/songs

Others were to follow .............. 

All fantastic obvs, but Mikeplow's 'The Classical', Otalgia's 'Hip Priest' and The Shrander's 'Nazis' are some of the finest covers you'll hear.  
And great that it, and those that followed, were so collaborative. Some fantastically off the wall covers. 
My brain is the most complex thing in the Universe. Hiccup said so.

"for the LOLZ!!!!"

'false bravado won't hide the cracks'
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Joined: 20 Jan 2006, 20:39

31 Jan 2018, 09:54 #453

This might turn into nothing, but as both Frank Skinner and Franz Ferdinand are on The One Show tonight I have some slight hope that there might be a mention at least.
"... a shiftless person, roving and magotie-headed, and sometimes little better than crased."
Reply

johncoan
Member
Joined: 18 Jun 2004, 23:12

31 Jan 2018, 11:35 #454

Aubrey The Cat wrote: This might turn into nothing, but as both Frank Skinner and Franz Ferdinand are on The One Show tonight I have some slight hope that there might be a mention at least.
Bands usually play just the one song, right? Maybe FF will do a Fall cover. Doubtful, tho'. But they WERE big fans...
be-boxed focken clown
Reply

Saveloy
Member
Joined: 27 Nov 2003, 12:24

31 Jan 2018, 12:26 #455

Starsky-Tandoori wrote:
rainmaster wrote:
Starsky-Tandoori wrote: A Fall Online Forum tribute, made in 2011. Hex Enduction Ours. 


  

hex-enduction-ours-t29367.html

https://www.reverbnation.com/fofthefall ... orum/songs

Others were to follow .............. 

All fantastic obvs, but Mikeplow's 'The Classical', Otalgia's 'Hip Priest' and The Shrander's 'Nazis' are some of the finest covers you'll hear.  
And great that it, and those that followed, were so collaborative. Some fantastically off the wall covers. 
They were such a laugh to do!

Quite fun to organise as well.  Sort of.  I might be mis-remembering that.

Here's the last of them, 'The Real New Forum LP':



Every time I have a tidy up or a clearout I re-find the bastard pile of CDs that I carefully assembled and never got around to sending out to fellow FoFers, and which I buried at the back of a drawer so as to hide my shame; and thus am shamed again.  ◕︵◕
Reply

Joined: 03 Mar 2009, 14:11

31 Jan 2018, 12:34 #456

Saveloy wrote:
Starsky-Tandoori wrote:
rainmaster wrote:
Starsky-Tandoori wrote: A Fall Online Forum tribute, made in 2011. Hex Enduction Ours. 


  

hex-enduction-ours-t29367.html

https://www.reverbnation.com/fofthefall ... orum/songs

Others were to follow .............. 

All fantastic obvs, but Mikeplow's 'The Classical', Otalgia's 'Hip Priest' and The Shrander's 'Nazis' are some of the finest covers you'll hear.  
And great that it, and those that followed, were so collaborative. Some fantastically off the wall covers. 
They were such a laugh to do!

Quite fun to organise as well.  Sort of.  I might be mis-remembering that.

Here's the last of them, 'The Real New Forum LP':



Every time I have a tidy up or a clearout I re-find the bastard pile of CDs that I carefully assembled and never got around to sending out to fellow FoFers, and which I buried at the back of a drawer so as to hide my shame; and thus am shamed again.  ◕︵◕
Send them out this year, purge your guilt 
My brain is the most complex thing in the Universe. Hiccup said so.

"for the LOLZ!!!!"

'false bravado won't hide the cracks'
Reply

Saveloy
Member
Joined: 27 Nov 2003, 12:24

31 Jan 2018, 12:52 #457

Starsky-Tandoori wrote: Send them out this year, purge your guilt 
Heh, I should, and I guess now would be a good time to do it.

Problem is, aside from PhilH, I can't remember who asked for one!

I'll have to go through the old emails and PMs. If I can't track the original requesters down I'll just offer them up again.
Reply

robbroncs
Member
Joined: 08 Apr 2005, 23:38

31 Jan 2018, 13:12 #458

Saveloy wrote:
Starsky-Tandoori wrote: Send them out this year, purge your guilt 
Heh, I should, and I guess now would be a good time to do it.

Problem is, aside from PhilH, I can't remember who asked for one!

I'll have to go through the old emails and PMs.  If I can't track the original requesters down I'll just offer them up again.
✋🏼
"who's gonna play me in the movie? STING!"
Reply

Joined: 07 Aug 2013, 18:36

31 Jan 2018, 13:15 #459

Starsky-Tandoori wrote: A Fall Online Forum tribute, made in 2011. Hex Enduction Ours. 


  

hex-enduction-ours-t29367.html

https://www.reverbnation.com/fofthefall ... orum/songs

Others were to follow .............. 
Y'know, I'd never even heard of this before, let alone actually heard it...turns out I was way behind the curve with the Hip Priest gender-flip? Who knew? Well, all of you, obviously...but still. 
http://hippriestess.tumblr.com/

Blog revived for MES tribute - "Fantastic Life: The 20 Greatest Fall Songs In No Order Whatsoever."
Reply

stefan
Member
Joined: 16 May 2003, 13:47

31 Jan 2018, 18:08 #460

Hi all, I'm working an in memoriam page for the Fall news and didn't see Graham Duff's lovely tribute here. Apologies if I missed it. I hope everyone is faring as well as can be expected. What a week it's been.



MARK E. SMITH 
(5th March 1957 – 24th January 2018)

It is with immeasurable sadness that I write of the passing of Mark E. Smith.

Mark was a singer, a wit, an original thinker and a truly visionary artist. And, like all visionary artists, the quality and scope of his work cannot even be approximated by others. I considered myself very fortunate to have been able to call him a friend.

My very first live encounter with The Fall was in October 1978 at the age of 14. It was sublime. They were playing at a Rock Against Racism benefit gig at a tiny club called Kelly’s in Manchester. The thing that immediately struck me was the group’s down to earth appearance and low key demeanor.

Punk, for all its talk of being a ground zero roots rebellion, still contained strong elements of show business. The majority of punk performances involved the bands projecting themselves into the audience’s fantasies via striking poses and jumping around in eye-catching outfits and sometimes make up. For instance, The Clash - often thought of as a group of natural and authentic rebels - had clearly choreographed their stage moves and designed their stage clothes (costumes) to have maximum impact.

With The Fall however, there wasn’t even a hint of show business. It seemed like direct communication. As they shambled onto stage, looking like a bunch of teenagers who’d just been thrown out of some grubby youth club, there was a very noticeable sense of ‘Take it or leave it. We know it’s good. You either get it or you don’t’.

Every song seemed to inhabit its own strange world. And I was fascinated by Mark’s between song banter. It was like there was no difference between him singing and him talking. Sometimes he made elliptical statements, sometimes he’d be describing what was happening on stage, but everything he said sounded enigmatic and quotable.

It was the song ‘Repetition’ which truly convinced me I had stumbled into the presence of genius. A hymn to ‘The three Rs; Repetition, Repetition, Repetition’, the track is five minutes of slow moving psychosis, a sonic statement of intent, which the lyrics describe as having been created for ‘All you daughters and sons who are sick of fancy music.’

After that I became a devotee. I saw The Fall as often as I could. Over the years I’ve seen them more than any other band. Somewhere north of 40 gigs – although I know men half my age who have seen them over a hundred times. I’ve seen a handful of so-so gigs and one dreadful one. But more often than not I’ve been transported by a man and a group who no matter how much they experimented always remained in touch with the primal excitements of rock and roll.

After my conversion at the age of 14 I tried to convince several of my school friends of the importance of band. Nobody else really got it. Some of them thought I was joking. Some of them seemed actively hostile towards the group. But the phrase I heard uttered the most often was “It’s too weird for me”.

The Fall are still a difficult band to defend to those who don’t get it. Because well, The Fall are a difficult band. Although they’ve produced their fair share of songs with hooks and catchy riffs, they are, at root, exponents of a singular brand of art rock. They follow their own path and it’s not always easy to tag along. Their music can frequently be abrasive, repetitious, atonal and sometimes deliberately downright ugly.

11 years ago, when I was writing the third series of ‘Ideal’ there was a scene where a mentally disturbed Christian builder has a vision of Jesus. But I didn’t imagine Jesus with a beard and flowing robes. I wanted him to look like some guy you might meet down the pub. Suddenly it became obvious who had to play the role…

I wasn’t sure whether it was a good omen or not, but when the clapper board was lifted into shot for the first take of Mark’s scene playing Jesus, miraculously it turned out to be slate number 666.

Mark was clearly out of his comfort zone but in the end he delivered a subtle and funny performance. The on screen result - Mark bathed in a golden glow, giving foul mouthed godly instructions, soundtracked by the strange celestial music of Coil - is the highlight of the third series. And it’s definitely my proudest TV achievement.

After that, to my scarcely concealed glee, Mark and I stayed in touch and became friends. We even collaborated together and wrote a horror film script. Sometimes his enthusiasm for the project would take me by surprise. On one occasion my landline rang at 2:30 in the morning. I answered it, expecting the worst. Expecting to be told a loved one is ill and that I need to go directly to some hospital or other. However, it was Mark. He’d just flown back from doing some gigs in Portugal and whilst on the plane had had “some pretty good ideas for the script”. I grabbed my notebook and pen and wiped the sleep from my eyes.

Sadly however, when we completed the screenplay every production company we showed it to told us “it’s too weird for me”.

The last time I saw Mark was on the 12th of November. I visited him in Prestwich, where he was recuperating after a course of chemo. He looked so skinny and careworn. But he was in remarkably good spirits. Although we talked a little about his illness, Mark was full of plans for the future. A week-long residency in Brooklyn, more recording and an idea for a documentary.

He’d been watching lots of DVDs and had recently enjoyed ‘The Greasy Strangler’ as well as revisiting Lindsay Anderson’s wonderful ‘Britannia Hospital’. He also said how disappointed he’d been with 'Electric Dreams' the TV series of Philip K. Dick adaptations, targeting the glossy title sequence in particular; “It’s like they’re trying to get you to join Nat West!” But most of all, we laughed. Mark was one of the funniest men I’ve ever known. The fact that you never knew where the humour was going to come from or what the target might be made his company all the more exhilarating.

As I rode in the taxi on the way back to Manchester, my cheeks were aching from laughing. Yet I was also well aware that this would probably be the last time I would ever see him.

I cannot begin to count the ways his work has influenced my own. I cannot begin to ponder on a cultural landscape without him. His legacy is enormous. His absence is bloody awful.

“Ours is not to look back, Ours is to continue the craic”
Reply

autotech
Member
Joined: 08 Feb 2007, 16:49

31 Jan 2018, 18:20 #461

stefan wrote: Hi all, I'm working an in memoriam page for the Fall news and didn't see Graham Duff's lovely tribute here. Apologies if I missed it. I hope everyone is faring as well as can be expected. What a week it's been.



MARK E. SMITH 
(5th March 1957 – 24th January 2018)

It is with immeasurable sadness that I write of the passing of Mark E. Smith.

Mark was a singer, a wit, an original thinker and a truly visionary artist. And, like all visionary artists, the quality and scope of his work cannot even be approximated by others. I considered myself very fortunate to have been able to call him a friend.

My very first live encounter with The Fall was in October 1978 at the age of 14. It was sublime. They were playing at a Rock Against Racism benefit gig at a tiny club called Kelly’s in Manchester. The thing that immediately struck me was the group’s down to earth appearance and low key demeanor.

Punk, for all its talk of being a ground zero roots rebellion, still contained strong elements of show business. The majority of punk performances involved the bands projecting themselves into the audience’s fantasies via striking poses and jumping around in eye-catching outfits and sometimes make up. For instance, The Clash - often thought of as a group of natural and authentic rebels - had clearly choreographed their stage moves and designed their stage clothes (costumes) to have maximum impact.

With The Fall however, there wasn’t even a hint of show business. It seemed like direct communication. As they shambled onto stage, looking like a bunch of teenagers who’d just been thrown out of some grubby youth club, there was a very noticeable sense of ‘Take it or leave it. We know it’s good. You either get it or you don’t’.

Every song seemed to inhabit its own strange world. And I was fascinated by Mark’s between song banter. It was like there was no difference between him singing and him talking. Sometimes he made elliptical statements, sometimes he’d be describing what was happening on stage, but everything he said sounded enigmatic and quotable.

It was the song ‘Repetition’ which truly convinced me I had stumbled into the presence of genius. A hymn to ‘The three Rs; Repetition, Repetition, Repetition’, the track is five minutes of slow moving psychosis, a sonic statement of intent, which the lyrics describe as having been created for ‘All you daughters and sons who are sick of fancy music.’

After that I became a devotee. I saw The Fall as often as I could. Over the years I’ve seen them more than any other band. Somewhere north of 40 gigs – although I know men half my age who have seen them over a hundred times. I’ve seen a handful of so-so gigs and one dreadful one. But more often than not I’ve been transported by a man and a group who no matter how much they experimented always remained in touch with the primal excitements of rock and roll.

After my conversion at the age of 14 I tried to convince several of my school friends of the importance of band. Nobody else really got it. Some of them thought I was joking. Some of them seemed actively hostile towards the group. But the phrase I heard uttered the most often was “It’s too weird for me”.

The Fall are still a difficult band to defend to those who don’t get it. Because well, The Fall are a difficult band. Although they’ve produced their fair share of songs with hooks and catchy riffs, they are, at root, exponents of a singular brand of art rock. They follow their own path and it’s not always easy to tag along. Their music can frequently be abrasive, repetitious, atonal and sometimes deliberately downright ugly.

11 years ago, when I was writing the third series of ‘Ideal’ there was a scene where a mentally disturbed Christian builder has a vision of Jesus. But I didn’t imagine Jesus with a beard and flowing robes. I wanted him to look like some guy you might meet down the pub. Suddenly it became obvious who had to play the role…

I wasn’t sure whether it was a good omen or not, but when the clapper board was lifted into shot for the first take of Mark’s scene playing Jesus, miraculously it turned out to be slate number 666.

Mark was clearly out of his comfort zone but in the end he delivered a subtle and funny performance. The on screen result - Mark bathed in a golden glow, giving foul mouthed godly instructions, soundtracked by the strange celestial music of Coil - is the highlight of the third series. And it’s definitely my proudest TV achievement.

After that, to my scarcely concealed glee, Mark and I stayed in touch and became friends. We even collaborated together and wrote a horror film script. Sometimes his enthusiasm for the project would take me by surprise. On one occasion my landline rang at 2:30 in the morning. I answered it, expecting the worst. Expecting to be told a loved one is ill and that I need to go directly to some hospital or other. However, it was Mark. He’d just flown back from doing some gigs in Portugal and whilst on the plane had had “some pretty good ideas for the script”. I grabbed my notebook and pen and wiped the sleep from my eyes.

Sadly however, when we completed the screenplay every production company we showed it to told us “it’s too weird for me”.

The last time I saw Mark was on the 12th of November. I visited him in Prestwich, where he was recuperating after a course of chemo. He looked so skinny and careworn. But he was in remarkably good spirits. Although we talked a little about his illness, Mark was full of plans for the future. A week-long residency in Brooklyn, more recording and an idea for a documentary.

He’d been watching lots of DVDs and had recently enjoyed ‘The Greasy Strangler’ as well as revisiting Lindsay Anderson’s wonderful ‘Britannia Hospital’. He also said how disappointed he’d been with 'Electric Dreams' the TV series of Philip K. Dick adaptations, targeting the glossy title sequence in particular; “It’s like they’re trying to get you to join Nat West!” But most of all, we laughed. Mark was one of the funniest men I’ve ever known. The fact that you never knew where the humour was going to come from or what the target might be made his company all the more exhilarating.

As I rode in the taxi on the way back to Manchester, my cheeks were aching from laughing. Yet I was also well aware that this would probably be the last time I would ever see him.

I cannot begin to count the ways his work has influenced my own. I cannot begin to ponder on a cultural landscape without him. His legacy is enormous. His absence is bloody awful.

“Ours is not to look back, Ours is to continue the craic”
That's really great.
Reply

Joined: 20 Jan 2006, 20:39

31 Jan 2018, 18:35 #462

^^^

It is.


A decent and long piece by Jon Wilde:

Jon Wilde on We Are Cult
"... a shiftless person, roving and magotie-headed, and sometimes little better than crased."
Reply

Joined: 12 Dec 2003, 22:35

31 Jan 2018, 19:23 #463

stefan wrote: Hi all, I'm working an in memoriam page for the Fall news and didn't see Graham Duff's lovely tribute here. Apologies if I missed it. I hope everyone is faring as well as can be expected. What a week it's been.
What a lovely post. Some great personal detail without being intrusive too.

But this bit:
We even collaborated together and wrote a horror film script. Sometimes his enthusiasm for the project would take me by surprise. On one occasion my landline rang at 2:30 in the morning. I answered it, expecting the worst. Expecting to be told a loved one is ill and that I need to go directly to some hospital or other. However, it was Mark. He’d just flown back from doing some gigs in Portugal and whilst on the plane had had “some pretty good ideas for the script”. I grabbed my notebook and pen and wiped the sleep from my eyes.

Sadly however, when we completed the screenplay every production company we showed it to told us “it’s too weird for me”.
Oh wow. Who here wouldn't want to see the script for that...
Reply

deselby
Member
deselby
Member
Joined: 02 Jun 2010, 22:11

31 Jan 2018, 19:37 #464

hermann neutics wrote:
stefan wrote: Hi all, I'm working an in memoriam page for the Fall news and didn't see Graham Duff's lovely tribute here. Apologies if I missed it. I hope everyone is faring as well as can be expected. What a week it's been.
What a lovely post. Some great personal detail without being intrusive too.

But this bit:
We even collaborated together and wrote a horror film script. Sometimes his enthusiasm for the project would take me by surprise. On one occasion my landline rang at 2:30 in the morning. I answered it, expecting the worst. Expecting to be told a loved one is ill and that I need to go directly to some hospital or other. However, it was Mark. He’d just flown back from doing some gigs in Portugal and whilst on the plane had had “some pretty good ideas for the script”. I grabbed my notebook and pen and wiped the sleep from my eyes.

Sadly however, when we completed the screenplay every production company we showed it to told us “it’s too weird for me”.
Oh wow. Who here wouldn't want to see the script for that...
Weird is not where Fall fans opt out, but what sparks our interest.  This needs to be made. Now. Who do we need to petition for this to happen?
Reply

autotech
Member
Joined: 08 Feb 2007, 16:49

31 Jan 2018, 20:07 #465

Aubrey The Cat wrote: ^^^

It is.


A decent and long piece by Jon Wilde:

Jon Wilde on We Are Cult
i like the line about him roaming through the group's music like a suspicious caretaker with a torch. seems like as good a description as i've heard.
Reply

WetWetWet
Member
Joined: 21 Jan 2010, 23:18

31 Jan 2018, 21:08 #466

Goodbye Fiery Jack.
Got lots of Mark E memories - lots of evenings when he came round for a wee drink till dawn. Some hilarious contentious evenings in a restaurant in Camden Passage. Surreal meeting in Venice - sharing a motor launch from the Hotel Des Bains with Mark. What? You? We were all staying there- he was with Brix and Manager Lennard. Andrew Wylie, ruthless genius literary agent, showed up too. We only needed Lassie and Colonel Gaddafi to complete that party. He was always up promptly at noon. Pair of shades and a beer.
The theatre bit with Lee Bowery and Michael Clarke. Maverick city. Simon and me recording with him at Matrix then of course getting amnesiacally leathered in the course of the night. Marks steady but infinite capacity for amps, alcohol and arguments, etc etc.
A uniquely sound man, always on the case, no mercy - premier acid contrarian and very funny - loved winding everyone up in every bizarre way available, chuckling like eggs in a frying pan. We got on well, oddly enough. Maybe it was both coming from a Manchester marginal. I really enjoy a good ranter and Mark was Olympic league. You could only listen in stunned admiration. No choice. Trying to get a word in was like standing in front of a Tianaman Tank.
Settling into a session, he loved discussing his dad and his town - and music. Utterly brilliant titles and lyrics - Cog Sinister, Adult Net, Glitter Freeze, How I Wrote Elastic Man - superb sprawling quarrelsome twisting songs. Skull Lodgers.You'd be spitting the bits out for months after. I was really pissed off he'd used Fiery Jack for a song title - missed out on that one - It's one of those real fierce Lancashire remedies capable of bringing down a passing pigeon - better title than Jumping Jack Flash. He was really pleased I wanted it. Big grin. Another drink.
Always insisting " Easy to be complicated - simplicity's the hardest thing". Total agreement about that.
We've lost a blinder. Unique man. A proper North West visionary crank genius. No one can ever fill those shiny shoes.
John Foxx
Loving Orbituary/observation by John Foxx posted on Facebook this Monday.
Hinc Robur et Securitas
Reply

Joined: 20 Jan 2006, 20:39

31 Jan 2018, 22:46 #467

^^^

I was pleased and touched to see that as well. Stupidly (I suppose), I had no idea that they even knew each other.
"... a shiftless person, roving and magotie-headed, and sometimes little better than crased."
Reply

WetWetWet
Member
Joined: 21 Jan 2010, 23:18

31 Jan 2018, 23:22 #468

^
Yes, but I think they're similar in that they are both headstrong and with a clear vision that they've maintained for abt 40 years. John's music is very good, while not so spectacular and unique as MES.
Hinc Robur et Securitas
Reply

Divvey
Moderator
Divvey
Moderator
Joined: 06 Dec 2003, 05:56

01 Feb 2018, 04:30 #469

Man city played Hit the North

hey ho

Reply

Kentaro
Member
Joined: 31 May 2006, 19:58

01 Feb 2018, 04:43 #470

The Dream Syndicate/ Steve Wynn

It's not surprising if you hear some of the sounds and stylings and attitudes of early Dream Syndicate on this playlist. The music of The Fall was as much an influence on us as anything out there at the time--and it still sounds great today. RIP Mark E. Smith. You were one of a kind.

Steve Wynn's Sonic Speakeasy--Special Edition:The Fall--Early Years (RIP Mark E. Smith)
Reply

GuyBoden
Member
Joined: 26 Jan 2018, 08:42

01 Feb 2018, 09:43 #471

Aubrey The Cat wrote: ^^^

It is.


A decent and long piece by Jon Wilde:

Jon Wilde on We Are Cult
Quote "they had been my favourite group for five years, ever since the release of their wonderfully slapdash debut single, It’s The New Thing."

Good read, but fiction obscures the facts......
Reply

sigma2
Member
Joined: 17 Dec 2015, 14:47

01 Feb 2018, 11:14 #472

GuyBoden wrote:
Aubrey The Cat wrote: ^^^

It is.


A decent and long piece by Jon Wilde:

Jon Wilde on We Are Cult
Quote "they had been my favourite group for five years, ever since the release of their wonderfully slapdash debut single, It’s The New Thing."

Good read, but fiction obscures the facts......
This has been said a few times. Arguably, Bingo Master was an EP, which would make New Thing first single.
Elitist Ponce
Reply

Joined: 25 Nov 2012, 19:22

01 Feb 2018, 11:18 #473

sigma2 wrote:
GuyBoden wrote:
Aubrey The Cat wrote: ^^^

It is.


A decent and long piece by Jon Wilde:

Jon Wilde on We Are Cult
Quote "they had been my favourite group for five years, ever since the release of their wonderfully slapdash debut single, It’s The New Thing."

Good read, but fiction obscures the facts......
This has been said a few times. Arguably, Bingo Master was an EP, which would make New Thing first single.
Oh come on, that really is splitting hairs. Most post-punk 'singles' of the era were EPs so the distinction is just silly. 
Reply

Neal Cassady
Member
Joined: 08 Dec 2005, 11:05

01 Feb 2018, 12:03 #474

academichamilton wrote:
sigma2 wrote:
GuyBoden wrote:
Aubrey The Cat wrote: ^^^

It is.


A decent and long piece by Jon Wilde:

Jon Wilde on We Are Cult
Quote "they had been my favourite group for five years, ever since the release of their wonderfully slapdash debut single, It’s The New Thing."

Good read, but fiction obscures the facts......
This has been said a few times. Arguably, Bingo Master was an EP, which would make New Thing first single.
Oh come on, that really is splitting hairs. Most post-punk 'singles' of the era were EPs so the distinction is just silly. 
More to the point, if he’d liked them for 5 years by the time New Thing had been released, he must have been a fan since 1974. Respect.
I'm not that good at smoking bongs, I'm not that good at breathing in.
Reply

Joined: 07 Aug 2013, 18:36

01 Feb 2018, 12:08 #475

sigma2 wrote:error
orror
http://hippriestess.tumblr.com/

Blog revived for MES tribute - "Fantastic Life: The 20 Greatest Fall Songs In No Order Whatsoever."
Reply