Accuracy and Forearm Hand Hold Postions ... Test Mule: Diana 350

Accuracy and Forearm Hand Hold Postions ... Test Mule: Diana 350

Joined: September 21st, 2009, 8:40 pm

July 30th, 2012, 7:06 am #1


Very interesting experiment on springer hand hold positions.
Does hand position affect springer accuracy? ... Test Mule: Diana 350
Best location for forearm supporting hand?
Near the trigger guard.

<div style="margin:5px 20px 20px;"><table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="6" width="100%"><tr><td style="border-bottom:1px inset;border-left:1px inset;border-top:1px inset;border-right:1px inset;">I thought I had the most accurate hold for my .177 Diana RWS 350 Magnum,
which is the hardest recoiling and one of the most powerful spring-piston air rifles in my collection.
Its recoil makes it one of the hardest rifles to shoot accurately. </td></tr></table></div><div> </div>
 
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Dan B
Dan B

July 30th, 2012, 3:33 pm #2

Good test, I wonder if the position of the hand on the forearm made more of a difference to the gun accuracy or the shooter accuracy though.

Certainly worth looking into and a consistent hold should give better accuracy.

Dan
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Joined: September 21st, 2009, 8:40 pm

July 30th, 2012, 4:17 pm #3


The intrinsic (mechanical) accuracy of the rifle system does not change with manner the rifle is held in.
However, the grip the shooter exerts on the rifle does influence the dynamics of the shot cycle.
That is, when the piston/spring/pellet/barrel (vibration) are in motion.
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RedFeather
RedFeather

July 30th, 2012, 6:53 pm #4

Very interesting experiment on springer hand hold positions.
Does hand position affect springer accuracy? ... Test Mule: Diana 350
Best location for forearm supporting hand?
Near the trigger guard.

<div style="margin:5px 20px 20px;"><table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="6" width="100%"><tr><td style="border-bottom:1px inset;border-left:1px inset;border-top:1px inset;border-right:1px inset;">I thought I had the most accurate hold for my .177 Diana RWS 350 Magnum,
which is the hardest recoiling and one of the most powerful spring-piston air rifles in my collection.
Its recoil makes it one of the hardest rifles to shoot accurately. </td></tr></table></div><div> </div>
 
Springers are so darned temperamental another gun might like position two, etc. It would also be nice to see that repeated with two or three additional shooters. He didn't mention his trigger hand grip, thumb position or how tightly he holds the gun.
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Joined: April 15th, 2009, 2:16 am

July 30th, 2012, 7:38 pm #5

I can change the POI and group size my 34 shoots just by changing my trigger hand thumb position. Hold too tight with the trigger hand and the groups open up. Too tight in the forward grip and groups open. And a variation in cheek pressure causes similar effects. And all this shooting a 34 not a 350 mag. This is partly why I'm heading toward the milder, easier to shoot springers.


"You've come far, pilgrim."------"Feels like far."
"Were it worth the trouble?"----"Ah, what trouble?"
Jim in SWMO

"You've come far, pilgrim."-------"Feels like far."
"Were it worth the trouble?"-----"Ah, what trouble?"
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Joined: September 21st, 2009, 8:40 pm

July 30th, 2012, 7:47 pm #6

Springers are so darned temperamental another gun might like position two, etc. It would also be nice to see that repeated with two or three additional shooters. He didn't mention his trigger hand grip, thumb position or how tightly he holds the gun.
RedFeather, if you view the video at approximately 2:42min the position of the firing hand is detailed.
However nothing is mentioned about thumb placement.
Other than what you can see in the video.
<div style="margin:5px 20px 20px;"><table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="6" width="100%"><tr><td style="border-bottom:1px inset;border-left:1px inset;border-top:1px inset;border-right:1px inset;">As long-time readers of this blog know,
the trick to wringing out the utmost accuracy from a spring-piston rifle
is to use the artillery hold that B.B. Pelletier has popularized.
It allows the rifle to recoil as it wants, while achieving consistency in the point of impact.
In the artillery hold, the forearm of the rifle rests lightly on your palm or the back of your fingers
or top of your closed fist so the rifle can move how it wants.
You do not grasp the forearm with your fingers.
That technique is explained here. </td></tr></table></div><div>__________________</div>
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Joined: December 14th, 2007, 5:44 pm

July 30th, 2012, 10:34 pm #7

with follow the LEADER

I can read and understand what others are finding out on how to shoot an air rifle

BUT!!! I will adapt those ideas with mine and only after shooting NON STOP with some changes and memorizing the results

I have found out that if you FOLLOW through after you pull the pellet you will develop a GOOD habit

that pellet does not travel in an instant it takes him from 7 to 8 mill seconds to ESCAPE the confines of the barrel

insignificant amount of time "YOU SAY"???

try it sometime with all your variables and find out

warren



and remember "it's 30% the gun and 70% the shooter"
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Joined: December 14th, 2007, 5:44 pm

July 30th, 2012, 10:36 pm #8

RedFeather, if you view the video at approximately 2:42min the position of the firing hand is detailed.
However nothing is mentioned about thumb placement.
Other than what you can see in the video.
<div style="margin:5px 20px 20px;"><table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="6" width="100%"><tr><td style="border-bottom:1px inset;border-left:1px inset;border-top:1px inset;border-right:1px inset;">As long-time readers of this blog know,
the trick to wringing out the utmost accuracy from a spring-piston rifle
is to use the artillery hold that B.B. Pelletier has popularized.
It allows the rifle to recoil as it wants, while achieving consistency in the point of impact.
In the artillery hold, the forearm of the rifle rests lightly on your palm or the back of your fingers
or top of your closed fist so the rifle can move how it wants.
You do not grasp the forearm with your fingers.
That technique is explained here. </td></tr></table></div><div>__________________</div>
with follow the LEADER

I can read and understand what others are finding out on how to shoot an air rifle

BUT!!! I will adapt those ideas with mine and only after shooting NON STOP with some changes and memorizing the results

I have found out that if you FOLLOW through after you pull the pellet you will develop a GOOD habit

that pellet does not travel in an instant it takes him from 7 to 8 mill seconds to ESCAPE the confines of the barrel

insignificant amount of time "YOU SAY"???

try it sometime with all your variables and find out

warren



and remember "it's 30% the gun and 70% the shooter"
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RedFeather
RedFeather

July 30th, 2012, 11:33 pm #9

Very interesting experiment on springer hand hold positions.
Does hand position affect springer accuracy? ... Test Mule: Diana 350
Best location for forearm supporting hand?
Near the trigger guard.

<div style="margin:5px 20px 20px;"><table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="6" width="100%"><tr><td style="border-bottom:1px inset;border-left:1px inset;border-top:1px inset;border-right:1px inset;">I thought I had the most accurate hold for my .177 Diana RWS 350 Magnum,
which is the hardest recoiling and one of the most powerful spring-piston air rifles in my collection.
Its recoil makes it one of the hardest rifles to shoot accurately. </td></tr></table></div><div> </div>
 
I did not see a link to a video in the blog. Anyway, his tests were interesting but nothing really new. Finding the most accurate hold is something done for every gun. Many competitive shooters mark positions on the stock for holding and resting so that the gun is held exactly the same from shot to shot. Personally, if you want to reproduce this shooter's test with your own gun, I would suggest blue painter's masking tape tape over what looked to be electrical. The glue on black tape is murder in hot weather. Cheers!
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Joined: September 21st, 2009, 8:40 pm

July 31st, 2012, 12:44 am #10

with follow the LEADER

I can read and understand what others are finding out on how to shoot an air rifle

BUT!!! I will adapt those ideas with mine and only after shooting NON STOP with some changes and memorizing the results

I have found out that if you FOLLOW through after you pull the pellet you will develop a GOOD habit

that pellet does not travel in an instant it takes him from 7 to 8 mill seconds to ESCAPE the confines of the barrel

insignificant amount of time "YOU SAY"???

try it sometime with all your variables and find out

warren



and remember "it's 30% the gun and 70% the shooter"
Follow-Through Technique<span style="text-transform:none;background-color:rgb(187,187,187);text-indent:0px;letter-spacing:normal;font:small Verdana;float:none;color:rgb(0,0,0);word-spacing:0px;"><span class="Apple-converted-space"> </span></span>
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