Tiffany Romain's paper about cryonicists in "Medical Anthropology"

Tiffany Romain's paper about cryonicists in "Medical Anthropology"

Joined: March 3rd, 2005, 2:52 am

June 11th, 2010, 6:21 pm #1

I paid $30 to download a pdf version of this paper:

Extreme Life Extension: Investing in Cryonics for the Long, Long Term

http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/conten ... rm=abslink

Leave a note if you would like me to email you a copy.
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Joined: October 6th, 2004, 6:46 pm

June 11th, 2010, 7:07 pm #2

But puzzled by this:

"One evening after work at Alcor, I asked a longtime employee why Alcor did not recycle anything, not even paper. He gave a lengthy explanation of how recycling is not cost effective for Alcor nor for the recycling industry in general."

Isn't Arizona civilized enough to have recycling pickups along with the trash, like most other places in the US, or is that just a "coastal" thing?

I have 3 bins: trash; paper, glass and plastic recycling; and plant matter. All picked up by a one-pass garbage truck.
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Joined: March 3rd, 2005, 2:52 am

June 12th, 2010, 12:44 am #3

From the online free version:

http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/sectio ... =713240928
During my field research, I found that for some consumers of cryonics services, the reorientation toward the future meant living largely in the framework of possibility. Several cryonicists expressed to me a desire to be better people and to live more adventurously and more fully when they come back in round two, post-reanimation. Many of the cryonicists' homes I visited appeared as if the inhabitants had just moved in, often open spaces with sparse, functional furniture, one or more computers, a small display of photographs, a television, and, often, a large collection of books.
I guess Romain missed the cryonicists who engage in compulsive hoarding. I have a tendency to do that myself, and I know of others. People magazine back in the 1980's reported the following about Dick Clair, based on what his partner Jenna McMahon said:
He obsessively saved "every scrap of paper, letters from grade school, drawings, even copies of letters he wrote to his parents and friends." Clair filled the garage, two bedrooms and the dining room of his Toluca Lake home with boxes, filing cabinets and shelves loaded with his papers, journals, notebooks, napkins, clippings and boxes of audiotapes. "His whole life is in those boxes," says McMahon, who says Clair left instructions for Alcor to microfilm every document. "He planned to use them to help reconstruct who he was after he woke up from being frozen."





Last edited by advancedatheist on June 12th, 2010, 12:49 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: October 6th, 2004, 6:46 pm

June 15th, 2010, 5:05 pm #4

I was reading about ancient Peruvians this morning that took the heads off their members for burial. Sharp stone knife and a big rock!
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Joined: October 6th, 2004, 6:46 pm

June 15th, 2010, 5:08 pm #5

Decapitation and rebirth

Recently excavated headless skeleton expands understanding of ancient Andean rituals

Images of disembodied heads are widespread in the art of Nasca, a culture based on the southern coast of Peru from AD 1 to AD 750. But despite this evidence and large numbers of trophy heads in the regions archaeological record, only eight headless bodies have been recovered with evidence of decapitation, explains Christina A. Conlee (Texas State University). Conlees analysis of a newly excavated headless body from the site of La Tiza provides important new data on decapitation and its relationship to ancient ideas of death and regeneration.

As Conlee outlines in the June issue of Current Anthropology, the third vertebrae of the La Tiza skeleton has dark cut marks, rounded edges, and no evidence of flaking or breakage, indicating decapitation occurred at or very soon after the time of death. A ceramic jar decorated with an image of a head was placed next to the body. The head has a tree with eyes growing out of it, the branches encircling the vessel.

"Ritual battles often take place just before plowing for potato planting, and trees and unripened fruit figure in these rituals, in which the shedding of blood is necessary to nourish the earth to produce a good harvest," Conlee writes. "The presence of scalp cuts on Nasca trophy heads suggests the letting of blood was an important part of the ritual that resulted in decapitation."

Conlee also points to damage on the jar that indicates it had already been handled and used before being included in the tomb. This was only the third head jar found with a headless skeleton. Most are found at domestic sites, and prior research has concluded that they were probably used to drink from, most likely in connection with fertility rituals. "If the head jar was used to drink from during fertility rituals, then its inclusion in the burial further strengthens the relationship between decapitation and rebirth," Conlee explains.

Notably, there is also no evidence of habitation in the La Tiza region during the Middle Nasca period (AD 450-550), to which the head jar dates. All of the Nasca domestic sites in the area date to the Early Nasca, indicating that the La Tiza skeleton may have been deliberately buried in an abandoned settlement that was associated with the ancestors.

"Human sacrifice and decapitation were part of powerful rituals that would have allayed fears by invoking the ancestors to ensure fertility and the continuation of Nasca society," Conlee writes. "The decapitation of the La Tiza individual appears to have been part of a ritual associated with ensuring agricultural fertility and the continuation of life and rebirth of the community."
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Joined: May 17th, 2009, 5:13 pm

June 20th, 2010, 2:43 pm #6

I was reading about ancient Peruvians this morning that took the heads off their members for burial. Sharp stone knife and a big rock!
I find it strange that you would prefer to look at the severing of heads as a manifestation of tribal magic than as an informed biomedical intervention to prevent information loss.

Do you also think of a visit to the doctor as similar to a visit to a witch-doctor? Perhaps they fill a similar social niche, an authority figure who adds certainty on matters of health.
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Joined: May 17th, 2009, 5:13 pm

June 20th, 2010, 2:57 pm #7

I paid $30 to download a pdf version of this paper:

Extreme Life Extension: Investing in Cryonics for the Long, Long Term

http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/conten ... rm=abslink

Leave a note if you would like me to email you a copy.
"Cryonics is both a consumer service and a grassroots movement, with the aim of bringing about a future in which humans are free individuals. For most cryonicists, the validity of the investment in cryonics is secured through a What have we got to lose? attitude, a tremendous faith in the future of both biotechnoscience and the free market, and Libertarian values including self-interest and individual freedom. And, in making an investment in cryonics services, cryonicists attempt to claim sovereignty over their bodies and futures. Biosociality among cryonicists consists of imaginaries of the future of biotechnoscience and cosmologies of life and human potential. The imaginaries that permeate cryonics are not simply of radically extended lifespans, but are technophilic, biological materialist, American, atheistic, Libertarian, and masculine in nature."

Of course I'd like to make cryonics more accessible to other categories of people, but as an American male it's great to hear about how manly and American my interests are.
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Joined: March 3rd, 2005, 2:52 am

June 20th, 2010, 7:16 pm #8

Most "cults" I've read about (defined as a new social movement based on a shared, novel world view) derive their vitality and staying power from their ability to attract female converts. We see that in early Mormonism, for example, which explains the male founders' ability in the 19th Century to build large families with plural wives. Considering the social standards these women challenged -- joining a controversial religious movement AND defying traditional beliefs about marriage and adultery -- their dedication seems all the more impressive.

Apparently the organized Ayn Rand cultism in the 1960's (the Nathaniel Branden Institute) also attracted a lot of women. From what I've read, I get the impression that many of Rand's single female groupies viewed Rand as a kind of romance novelist they wanted to hang with. Their presence at NBI events provided an incentive for Rand's single, mostly geeky fanboys to show up and play along with Rand's delusions of grandeur. Despite NBI's relative obscurity, it did attract many thousands of participants and students before Rand had her fight with Nathaniel Branden and he shut down his part of the cult.

By contrast, something about cryonics just doesn't appeal to women in significant numbers, which therefore makes it unsuccessful as a "cult." I suspect cryonics' pro-male bias accounts in part for its failure to cross some threshold into a thriving state.
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Joined: October 11th, 2006, 4:20 am

June 20th, 2010, 7:44 pm #9

save a technical breakthrough on revival, we will only gain a larger and more rounded membership when we integrate cryonics into local churches.

I say this as an atheist.

Personally, I think you would make a great preacher, Mark, as I recall from some of your earlier videos that you had a nice voice and camera presence. Women like preachers, too.....
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Joined: October 2nd, 2004, 8:27 pm

June 20th, 2010, 8:16 pm #10

... have no place in the world of cryonics. Cryonics appears cultish to some people already; just add religion to it and you will solidify their case.

Besides, you are from America, right? And the Bible Belt, correct? America is about the only developed country in Western civilization that still has such a large percentage of its population whose lives are enslaved by the religious mentality. Most of Europe - the majority of people are like you, Mark and I - atheist or agnostic. How are we going to promote cryonics there? It sure won't be by connecting it with religion.

I have no problem with religious folks signing up for cryonics, and many have. I do have a problem with putting religion on cryonics' front page. And I see no value in getting masses of ignorant people to sign up. What are they good for? Promulgating more ignorance?

Cheers,

FD
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