OWADA FREEZER update

Joined: 2:07 AM - Aug 09, 2006

12:10 PM - Aug 22, 2009 #1

Matt Sullivan pointed in the right direction for new research in 2008 on the Owada freezer.
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&safe ... rt=10&sa=N

What is the update on this?
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Joined: 2:07 AM - Aug 09, 2006

6:18 PM - Aug 22, 2009 #2

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PhilO
PhilO

9:42 PM - Aug 22, 2009 #3

On Sun, Aug 16, 2009 at 11:05 AM, Ben Best wrote:
>
> Below is a message that I posted to the Cryonics Institute
> Yahoo Group in early June 2008. Later that month I visited
> 21CM and discussed the matter with them. They acknowledged
> that the technology has promise and that following up on
> it would fit in with other research plans. I have not
> discussed the matter with them since, but it is worth
> a follow-up.

A distinction needs to be made between RF treatment of
cryopreserved tissue generally, and the Owada idea specifically. The
idea and technology of exposing tissue to radiofrequency and microwave
frequency electric fields, especially for warming, goes back decades
in cryobiology. It has also been known for some time in the published
literature that RF energy seems to enhance the process of
vitrification by encouraging supercooling and suppressing ice
formation by non-thermal effects. So the general technology applying
RF energy to samples being vitrified and rewarmed certainly has
promise, and will probably be investigated further in due course at
21CM. However Owada did not invent the idea of using RF energy in
cryopreservation.

The Owada technology, as I understand it from reading the
patent and other documents (there is no scientific literature on
Owada's method last time I looked) is something very specific. He
applies RF energy to encourage supercooling of material cooled below
the freezing point so that freezing occurs more suddenly and
completely at a lower temperature than it normally would. This
apparently results in less freezing damage to foods. I am skeptical
that this would be of utility for cryopreserving organs because most
organs don't tolerate formation of large amounts of ice, which is why
vitrification remains the most actively studied approach for
cryopreservation of complex tissues in cryobiology.

Last year I also wrote about Owada here:

http://www.imminst. org/forum/ index.php? s=&showtopic= 22307&view= findpost& p=242802
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PhilO
PhilO

9:54 PM - Aug 22, 2009 #4

quote from an owada freezer article

t works like a microwave oven but in reverse. Inside the freezer the object being frozen is zapped with a strong magnetic field and, Owada says, other kinds of energy. The field keeps the cream or beef's water molecules swirling in liquid form even as their temperature plummets. When the field is switched off, the object is instantly frozen, without time for the formation of ice crystals. These crystals normally rip apart organic cells, which degrades the texture and taste of food.

Wowk wrote

The Owada technology, as I understand it from reading the
patent and other documents (there is no scientific literature on
Owada's method last time I looked) is something very specific. He
applies RF energy to encourage supercooling
of material cooled below
the freezing point so that freezing occurs more suddenly and
completely at a lower temperature than it normally would

My comment....

This is an odd thing because wowk knows magnetism-- his wiki says...

quote
He obtained his undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Canada. His graduate studies included work in online portal imaging for radiotherapy at the Manitoba Cancer Treatment and Research Foundation (now Cancer Care Manitoba), and work on artifact reduction for functional magnetic resonance imaging at the National Research Council of Canada. His work in the latter field is cited by several text books, including Functional MRI[2] which includes an image he obtained of magnetic field changes inside the human body caused by respiration.
unquote

Me-- How could Wowk miss the whole point of OWada unless he's not really looking into it? Frankly, he seems dismissive. The articles available on Google are far more promising... and deserve more enthusiasm from Wowk. Wowk is being super-careful and erring on the side of conservatism in my view-- the tell tale sign being his neglect in speaking of the magnetism aspect of Owada's freezing method. At least wowk could express "conditional enthusiasm" over the novel approach... but again-- he has "too much to lose" in repuation if he's wrong. My advice to cryonicist, given Wowk's answer to Best-- ignore Wowk. Let's do our own legwork.

Owada's freezer works and its selling...

quote
So far his privately held company, ABI, has sold 230 freezer systems to food processors, restaurants, hotels and hospitals in and outside Japan. Sales were $14 million last year. Agriculture and fisheries officials from around the world have been poking around his iceboxes, which cost between $100,000 and $3 million. In February Owada showed off his invention to Ireland's farm minister, Mary Coughlan. "I fed her defrosted shrimp, tuna, squid and sea bream. She said it tasted like fresh," says Owada.
quote
http://www.forbes.com/global/2008/0602/053.html

Me-- now how in the world is this contraption going to sell THAT well, if it doesn't work? wowk makes no referrence. Remember, Wowk compares cryonics to a heart transplant. In my view, Wowk is over-rated in cryonics and we ought to get beyond him. Owada freezing deservers FAR FAR FAR more attention than Wowk indicates... and that ASAP.











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Philo
Philo

10:04 PM - Aug 22, 2009 #5

Matt Sullivan pointed in the right direction for new research in 2008 on the Owada freezer.
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&safe ... rt=10&sa=N

What is the update on this?
the fact that Wowk isn't playing with one is a big puzzle to me-- it's actually outrageous--
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PhilO
PhilO

10:18 PM - Aug 22, 2009 #6

Matt Sullivan pointed in the right direction for new research in 2008 on the Owada freezer.
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&safe ... rt=10&sa=N

What is the update on this?
Place your hand in here, says Norio Owada, president of Abi Inc., with a mysterious smile on his face. Inside Mr. Owadas research facility is an array of freezing units. My hand is concealed inside the device as I place it over the magnet. A gust of chilled air spews forth as the machine is switched on. Within seconds, my hands are shivering uncontrollably, but its not from the cold. Its as if some unseen force is pulsing and shaking through me..

http://www.jetrans.net/mt/archives/sessions/

Conventional quick-freezing freezes (1) foods with chilled air several dozen degrees below zero. In this method, the outer surface of the food is thoroughly frozen, but freezing the inside is a time consuming process. As moisture is drawn to the surface, the inside is left dry while ice crystals cluster on the outer surface, destroying cell tissue and leading to what is known as capillary action where juices drip from the thawing food.

Food given the deep freeze under CAS can keep ingredients fresh for up to two or three years, keeping the cell tissue intact even when frozen. Even after thawing, the foods flavor and freshness remain exactly as before. The unprecedented high price tag for CAS-frozen tuna is surely a stamp of approval from pro evaluators.

What started as technology for preserving cream has now taken the food and medical world by storm.

My comment-- he calls it CAS for "cell's alive system"... !!!??

If a material is frozen with CAS, the material will have a shelf life of 2 to 3 years. Cell tissue is not damaged at the time of freezing, so the material keeps (3) same freshness and flavor (4) as they were before the freezing. The fact that the CAS-frozen tuna recorded (5) all-time high price means that veteran wholesalers vouched for the quality.

The technology originally invented for preserving fresh cream for (6) longer period than ever is now considered promising in the food and medical industries.

When freezing food products or ingredients, CAS applies a small amount of energy to the (1) object placed under a magnetic field. In this way, the (1) objects molecules are kept agitated during the freezing process, thereby preventing water from clustering to form frozen layers on the outer surface. The result is uniform and instantaneous freezing of the foodstuff. (2)

CAS frozen food products or ingredients can be stored for long periods without deterioration because their cellular structure is not damaged. Their original flavor, texture and taste are retained when defrosted after two to three years of frozen storage. The effectiveness of CAS may well have been evidenced by that lucky tuna winning the sky-high bidding as hard proof of a golden seal of approval given by those pros in the fish business.

Technology originally developed as a way of long-term dairy cream preservation now has good potential to dominate in the future world of food processing and medical services as well.

<b>note to mods-- if you don't publish this here, I'll publish it elsewhere. CF was my first choice and I don't believe in cross posting-- This is important and exclusive... A primary angle here is to consider Wowk's, 21CM's, Fahy's and others' dismissiveness as a sure sign of a deep seated problem in cryonics that we all must now overcome and ignore. WHO will be the FIRST CRYOWADAZIZED MAN??-- CryoWad? cryonics via owada machine? Keep in mind there is no need for recovery just yet-- since we "freeze, WAIT, reanimat" but certainly the freezing part-- can be done in a credible way in a cryonics lab.


This technology has been underreported. This post and thread are intended to reveres that and point out its importance.

</b>
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Joined: 8:27 PM - Oct 02, 2004

2:53 AM - Aug 23, 2009 #7

the fact that Wowk isn't playing with one is a big puzzle to me-- it's actually outrageous--
I've heard that most of 21CM's work has little to do with cryonics at all, but instead to make a profit for its private shareholders. Cryonics related stuff is either a byproduct or a low priority.

Nonetheless, it is likely they have one and are "playing with it", but are not telling you or me. This would correspond with the view that they are part of the private empire which originated the "paradigm of secrecy" in cryonics.

If they have one and are making successful progress with it, who do you think will benefit from it when they need it? Sure won't be you or me.

So now why do you think "they" should be the first to be looking at this idea?

Cheers,

FD
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Joined: 2:07 AM - Aug 09, 2006

4:17 PM - Aug 23, 2009 #8

There is so much wrong with that post FD that I don't know where to begin. You don't seem to know what you're tlaking about and I'm not going to sit here and try to figure it out. YOu seem out of the loop in many ways.
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Joined: 2:07 AM - Aug 09, 2006

9:48 PM - Aug 23, 2009 #9

Place your hand in here, says Norio Owada, president of Abi Inc., with a mysterious smile on his face. Inside Mr. Owadas research facility is an array of freezing units. My hand is concealed inside the device as I place it over the magnet. A gust of chilled air spews forth as the machine is switched on. Within seconds, my hands are shivering uncontrollably, but its not from the cold. Its as if some unseen force is pulsing and shaking through me..

http://www.jetrans.net/mt/archives/sessions/

Conventional quick-freezing freezes (1) foods with chilled air several dozen degrees below zero. In this method, the outer surface of the food is thoroughly frozen, but freezing the inside is a time consuming process. As moisture is drawn to the surface, the inside is left dry while ice crystals cluster on the outer surface, destroying cell tissue and leading to what is known as capillary action where juices drip from the thawing food.

Food given the deep freeze under CAS can keep ingredients fresh for up to two or three years, keeping the cell tissue intact even when frozen. Even after thawing, the foods flavor and freshness remain exactly as before. The unprecedented high price tag for CAS-frozen tuna is surely a stamp of approval from pro evaluators.

What started as technology for preserving cream has now taken the food and medical world by storm.

My comment-- he calls it CAS for "cell's alive system"... !!!??

If a material is frozen with CAS, the material will have a shelf life of 2 to 3 years. Cell tissue is not damaged at the time of freezing, so the material keeps (3) same freshness and flavor (4) as they were before the freezing. The fact that the CAS-frozen tuna recorded (5) all-time high price means that veteran wholesalers vouched for the quality.

The technology originally invented for preserving fresh cream for (6) longer period than ever is now considered promising in the food and medical industries.

When freezing food products or ingredients, CAS applies a small amount of energy to the (1) object placed under a magnetic field. In this way, the (1) objects molecules are kept agitated during the freezing process, thereby preventing water from clustering to form frozen layers on the outer surface. The result is uniform and instantaneous freezing of the foodstuff. (2)

CAS frozen food products or ingredients can be stored for long periods without deterioration because their cellular structure is not damaged. Their original flavor, texture and taste are retained when defrosted after two to three years of frozen storage. The effectiveness of CAS may well have been evidenced by that lucky tuna winning the sky-high bidding as hard proof of a golden seal of approval given by those pros in the fish business.

Technology originally developed as a way of long-term dairy cream preservation now has good potential to dominate in the future world of food processing and medical services as well.

<b>note to mods-- if you don't publish this here, I'll publish it elsewhere. CF was my first choice and I don't believe in cross posting-- This is important and exclusive... A primary angle here is to consider Wowk's, 21CM's, Fahy's and others' dismissiveness as a sure sign of a deep seated problem in cryonics that we all must now overcome and ignore. WHO will be the FIRST CRYOWADAZIZED MAN??-- CryoWad? cryonics via owada machine? Keep in mind there is no need for recovery just yet-- since we "freeze, WAIT, reanimat" but certainly the freezing part-- can be done in a credible way in a cryonics lab.


This technology has been underreported. This post and thread are intended to reveres that and point out its importance.

</b>
http://www.network54.com/Forum/291677/m ... in+action-

Ben said they cost 500K but I see them for 170K. And I see there are cheap chinese knock offs too...
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Joined: 2:45 PM - Jan 25, 2007

11:15 AM - Aug 24, 2009 #10

There is so much wrong with that post FD that I don't know where to begin. You don't seem to know what you're tlaking about and I'm not going to sit here and try to figure it out. YOu seem out of the loop in many ways.
Never thought I'd see the day when FD was espousing conspiracy theories about secret evil empires while Phil was playing the voice of reason. I'm not expecting it to last long, though. I'm sure it's just some sort of weak spot in the fabric of reality, or some error in my perception.
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