Hey, The Anticult.

Hey, The Anticult.

Joined: March 3rd, 2005, 2:52 am

May 28th, 2009, 12:31 am #1

Cryonicists do not "deny death." We fully acknowledge that death occurs, and we call for urgently needed technological solutions to it.

The feckless "skeptics" like The Anticult, by contrast, apparently believe that something spooky, paranormal or supernatural happens at death that defies the ability of science and technology to intervene, even in the future. That differs from religious views of death how?

(The useful skeptics, by contrast, bother to think about the cryonics argument and offer constructive criticisms. And we need a lot more of their input, because we spend too much time talking amongst ourselves. "Hey, you cryonicists aren't doing it right! Here, let me show you how to do it better.")
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Joined: March 3rd, 2005, 2:52 am

May 28th, 2009, 12:38 am #2

Cryonicists do not want to "cheat death," and if we ever get into discussions or debates where that phrase occurs, we should immediately challenge it. It frames cryonics as an inherently immoral activity and biases the discussion against us. Moreover, no anthropomorphic being called "death" exists with rights we want to defraud. The idea of "cheating death" belongs to the same primitive world view which also assumes that death happens supernaturally and defies the application of scientific and technological rationality.


Last edited by advancedatheist on May 28th, 2009, 12:45 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: October 11th, 2006, 4:20 am

May 28th, 2009, 1:42 am #3

if you are a follower and disciple of jesus, you will live forever on the earth. Not in some make believe Heaven, but right here on earth.

Jesus commands his disciples to raise the dead. That is what cryonicists are doing. We are doing the work of Jesus.

When the second coming arrives, Jesus will come and revive the cryoncists, and we cryos will be rewarded with immortality.

It says so in the bible.

Nothing wrong with immortality.

it says right in the bible that Jesus is fighting his final battle, a battle against Death.

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Joined: October 2nd, 2004, 8:27 pm

May 28th, 2009, 2:26 am #4

... A cultish LaRouche follower threatening cryonics with political fanaticism and hysteria, or The Not-So-Right Rev. Unperson trying to mix cryonics with religion.

The last I remember, neither Alcor nor Cryonics Institute is mentioned in "The Bible".

Along a more serious line, it is intellectually dishonest and a false portrayal to the public to claim that cryonics was intended as the medium towards immortality in the ancient writings comprising "The Bible". Objective historians generally conclude that Jesus was a Jewish political aspirant (akin to LaRouche?) and that his fanatical followers deified him with fantastic stories. So much for that argument.

Cryonics will fall on its face public relations-wise unless it is presented honestly and objectively, and grows to become an accepted part of mainstream medical discipline.

FD
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Joined: October 11th, 2006, 4:20 am

May 28th, 2009, 3:10 am #5

so I don't blaspheme
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Joined: May 17th, 2009, 5:13 pm

May 28th, 2009, 3:59 am #6

... A cultish LaRouche follower threatening cryonics with political fanaticism and hysteria, or The Not-So-Right Rev. Unperson trying to mix cryonics with religion.

The last I remember, neither Alcor nor Cryonics Institute is mentioned in "The Bible".

Along a more serious line, it is intellectually dishonest and a false portrayal to the public to claim that cryonics was intended as the medium towards immortality in the ancient writings comprising "The Bible". Objective historians generally conclude that Jesus was a Jewish political aspirant (akin to LaRouche?) and that his fanatical followers deified him with fantastic stories. So much for that argument.

Cryonics will fall on its face public relations-wise unless it is presented honestly and objectively, and grows to become an accepted part of mainstream medical discipline.

FD
Jesus really did promise immortality -- literal unending life after this life ends.

Christianity is cheap, all you need do is believe 100% and commit your life to it. No monetary stings attached, other than a few tithes and love offerings.

Unlike cryonics, Christianity's proponents promise it will work, and that it will last forever. Jesus said so, and so they know it to be true. With cryonics we have to rely on science, which doesn't promise anything but just sort of hints and waggles its eyebrows and says it might be an interesting possibility.

Comparatively speaking, it sounds like with cryonics you are just settling for second-best...
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Joined: October 2nd, 2004, 8:27 pm

May 28th, 2009, 5:26 am #7

so I don't blaspheme
which is the damage done to cryonics by associating idiotic ideas with it. I have no idea who all the cryonic antidefaming committee is/was, but I applauded everything I happened to see of them, though I had little time to surfing the nonsense they perceived to be destructive.

You sound more bright sometimes than you usually come across, un. I think you understand what I mean.

FD
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Joined: October 2nd, 2004, 8:27 pm

May 28th, 2009, 5:36 am #8

Jesus really did promise immortality -- literal unending life after this life ends.

Christianity is cheap, all you need do is believe 100% and commit your life to it. No monetary stings attached, other than a few tithes and love offerings.

Unlike cryonics, Christianity's proponents promise it will work, and that it will last forever. Jesus said so, and so they know it to be true. With cryonics we have to rely on science, which doesn't promise anything but just sort of hints and waggles its eyebrows and says it might be an interesting possibility.

Comparatively speaking, it sounds like with cryonics you are just settling for second-best...
If you do, you are accepting the word of fanatical Jesus people like Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. And whoever wrote all the "epistles". They embellished a lot of stuff, Luke, as I pointed out in my prior post. Jesus probably never promised anyone anything except a better temporal life in the area he politicized in.

If, indeed, he ever existed at all, which is the view of some scholars.

As to whether we should cater to people who gullibly believe such crap by associating cryonics with their myths, well, I already sounded off on that. It is ethically wrong wrong wrong, and I don't even need a religious context for that "wrong". Why? For one pragmatic reason, it will rebound, bite back, and backfire on any cryo orgs that promote it, once the press gets ahold of the false association. Not to mention, did I say "wrong"? IMO if cryonics cannot be presented honestly and in a forthright manner, we have big problems. Like with certain current cryo orgs who are less than forthright.

Cheers,

FD
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Joined: October 11th, 2006, 4:20 am

May 28th, 2009, 8:44 am #9

Jesus really did promise immortality -- literal unending life after this life ends.

Christianity is cheap, all you need do is believe 100% and commit your life to it. No monetary stings attached, other than a few tithes and love offerings.

Unlike cryonics, Christianity's proponents promise it will work, and that it will last forever. Jesus said so, and so they know it to be true. With cryonics we have to rely on science, which doesn't promise anything but just sort of hints and waggles its eyebrows and says it might be an interesting possibility.

Comparatively speaking, it sounds like with cryonics you are just settling for second-best...
and there are about 150 MILLION people in America who believe in the bible.

How many believe in cryonics? 1500, maybe? That is 100 THOUSAND TIMES a bigger audience.

Gee, I think now we know why cryonics has failed to grow.....

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Joined: October 11th, 2006, 4:20 am

May 28th, 2009, 8:45 am #10

If you do, you are accepting the word of fanatical Jesus people like Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. And whoever wrote all the "epistles". They embellished a lot of stuff, Luke, as I pointed out in my prior post. Jesus probably never promised anyone anything except a better temporal life in the area he politicized in.

If, indeed, he ever existed at all, which is the view of some scholars.

As to whether we should cater to people who gullibly believe such crap by associating cryonics with their myths, well, I already sounded off on that. It is ethically wrong wrong wrong, and I don't even need a religious context for that "wrong". Why? For one pragmatic reason, it will rebound, bite back, and backfire on any cryo orgs that promote it, once the press gets ahold of the false association. Not to mention, did I say "wrong"? IMO if cryonics cannot be presented honestly and in a forthright manner, we have big problems. Like with certain current cryo orgs who are less than forthright.

Cheers,

FD
100 THOUSAND times more, Do the math....
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