cardiac arrest alarms?

cardiac arrest alarms?

Joined: June 8th, 2009, 3:02 am

January 26th, 2010, 1:57 pm #1

I think there's little need to explain the need for such a thing. It would seem simple enough to find one that simply alarmed loudly like the common home smoke detector if the heart ceased to beat. Are there any available yet?
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Joined: March 3rd, 2005, 2:52 am

January 26th, 2010, 2:53 pm #2

http://www.benbest.com/cryonics/alarms.html

We still have to wait a few years before we see FM-2030's "life support suit" which protects your body against trauma, monitors your health, calls 911 or its future equivalent when you go into cardiac arrest and automatically drops your body temperature.

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Joined: April 30th, 2006, 1:38 am

January 26th, 2010, 7:28 pm #3

...come in a bikini version? Sounds restrictive! I guess the beach would be out.

Seriously, it's things like this that make me wonder how much of this life some cryonicists are willing to sacrifice, for a future that may never come. I know a few people who have devoted a rather large percentage of their time to cryonics, and I don't see the field progressing enough for me to give reanimation more than "slim-to-none" odds. It seems best to find a way to look toward the future, while enjoying every minute of the one life we can be sure of. Just a thought.
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Joined: June 8th, 2009, 3:02 am

January 26th, 2010, 8:55 pm #4

Hey, I may be ignorant, but I felt this was a serious question about if there might be just a simple cardiac arrest alarm available. Actually, having posted that "question", I am less enthusiastic than ever about Cold Filter, it's contents, and usefulness now.
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Joined: March 3rd, 2005, 2:52 am

January 26th, 2010, 9:16 pm #5

Or do you have a problem with Ben Best?
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Joined: October 2nd, 2004, 8:27 pm

January 27th, 2010, 12:04 am #6

Hey, I may be ignorant, but I felt this was a serious question about if there might be just a simple cardiac arrest alarm available. Actually, having posted that "question", I am less enthusiastic than ever about Cold Filter, it's contents, and usefulness now.
... because you felt your question was serious, then somebody gave you a link to the info, and then somebody poo-pooh'd it? CF is no different from real life, John - you'll find every opinion out there. Personally I think it is a needed research project to develop such a device that is useable for cryonics purposes. Similar devices I've read about that already exist seem not to be well-suited for cryonics for one reason or another.

FD
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Joined: April 30th, 2006, 1:38 am

January 27th, 2010, 2:55 pm #7

I did get a laugh out of the thought of people walking around in a suit "which protects your body against trauma, monitors your health, calls 911 or its future equivalent when you go into cardiac arrest and automatically drops your body temperature," so I cracked a joke about it. Get over it. I probably heard more jokes while working in heart surgery, than anywhere else, in my entire life, and there's good reason for that.

Mark had already provided a link to Ben Best's extensive information, on this topic, so feeling the question had already been answered, I didn't see the harm in a little humor. Also, the hypothermia suit led to me having a serious (though tangential) thought, about how much of this life some cryonicists are willing to sacrifice on a future life that will, most likely, never come. (Sorry, for the skepticism, but that's how I feel, considering the level of care given during cryonic suspension, up to this point in time.)

I'm not sure what John King is wanting. Would he want a device that would "(alarm) loudly like the common home smoke detector if (his) heart ceased to beat, out on the street, or just something for home? Personally, I think if someone out in public went into cardiac arrest, and a blaring alarm went off, most people would run in the opposite direction. At any rate, they would be extremely unlikely to initiate hypothermia. Most likely, anyone who helped would simply call 911, (with, or without, an audible alarm), and hopefully, someone would initiate CPR.

On the other hand, there are plenty of audible cardiac alarms, for home use. My grandson wore one for his first seven months of life, (due to a sibling who died as an infant). It was lightweight, and monitored both heartrate and respirations. Whenever the baby slept, my daughter put a little belt around his chest and hooked two leads to a small monitor, (she dangled the leads out the bottom of his pajama pants). I can tell you, firsthand, that thing would wake the dead. One night, while they were visiting me, it went off and scared the hell out of everyone in the house. Luckily, the situation ended with me having a laugh, at my daughter's expense. She was panicking, sitting with the monitor in her hands, looking at a respiratory rate of 4-6 breaths per minute, shouting "Call 911, call 911." I could see, simply by looking at the baby, that he was breathing normally. (This is sort of an example of what laymen usually due with medical alarms...panic.) I reassured her, and then teased her about treating the monitor, rather than the baby. The device had a battery pack, so I suppose it could be worn, when out and about. It would be somewhat of an inconvenience, due to the size, weight, and cables, but it wasn't really all that big. The main factor would be the cost, (about $6,000, I believe).

As Ben points out, most wireless personal alarms are of the "panic button" variety, but I feel reasonably sure that, with a little research, someone could find a few portable devices that will call emergency numbers, in the event of cardiac arrest. At any rate, I'm sure there are many reputable organizations, already familiar with cardiac monitoring, working on such devices, and it makes no sense, to me, at all, to develop one purely for cryonics purposes. It seems one of the best solutions would be to move near your cryonics organization, and to have a device that would call the facility, in the event of an emergency. As for FD's suggestion that "it is a needed research project to develop such a device that is useable for cryonics purposes," I'm sure Saul Kent can find an overpaid wannabe engineering consultant, (or two, or three), to work on this for a decade, (or two, or three).
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Joined: July 1st, 2007, 8:16 am

January 27th, 2010, 6:54 pm #8

Well, it should be!

This may be a good topic for jokes, but I think this subject should have a very high priority for ALL cryo providers. Such unit should be a combination of hearth monitor, GPS unit and cell phone. With current technology it is possible to design such unit. About twelve years ago, my doctor gave me to wear a heart monitor unit. It was a small box, size of a cigarette pack. It recorded every heart beat. I wore it 24 hours under my arm and after 24 hours of wearing it, the doctor printed out from it a detailed report.

That was twelve years ago, the cell phones were just starting in the mass market. There were no GPS units. Now it should not be too expensive to create such unit, that could be used by all cryoservices providers. Case histories shows that there is a need for such devices. Case in point is the last Alcor patient in Florida. IIRC, the patient expired alone and he was discovered only after his relatives called the police because they have not heard from him for some time. He was cryopreserved. His cryopreservation was quite a windfall for Alcor, but the usefulness of his crypreservation is very questionable and proves the severe need for such device.

Ben Best is developing such limited unit. But that is for use by Mr. Ettinger, so it has no GPS, nor real time cell phone reporting functions. There is a need for a universal unit, which would monitor hearth and in a real time constantly transmitted both the hearth activities and GPS location to a central unit located at the cryoprovider's main location, or to a commercial monitoring site for a monthly subscription fee. Unfortunately, with the sorry state of cryonics it might be a long time until someone in authority decides to do it.

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Joined: June 8th, 2009, 3:02 am

January 27th, 2010, 11:32 pm #9

Yes, it is an important issue. Perhaps there are few to none more urgent to successful cryonics. I think there is some complicated reason such a device is not available yet, like reasons why "cryonics" itself is not more accepted or developed yet. Basically, we really only need a loud alarm if there is no pulse detected I guess. And I realize the problem with false alarms if the device malfunctions or the signal somehow gets broken. Now I feel, with these further posts taking things more seriously, that maybe you all are redeemed....maybe.
Cold Filter I have always thought of as a place to find support for cryonics, but sometimes I have had doubts -- like maybe there are more postings that intend to destroy cryonics than well intentioned positive criticism. I wonder even more about intentions if there is no way of knowing who is actually funded or contracted with a cryonics facility. Somehow if one is not, then I cannot really find them quite as credible. This is all no less than a matter of life or death to me. It is always a serious matter, with lots of other alternative places on the Internet to find humor.
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Joined: October 2nd, 2004, 8:27 pm

January 28th, 2010, 12:53 am #10

http://www.helpguide.org/life/humor_laughter_health.htm

"In addition to the domino effect of joy and amusement, laughter also triggers healthy physical changes in the body. Humor and laughter strengthen your immune system, boost your energy, diminish pain, and protect you from the damaging effects of stress."

Google "humor health benefits" for many other articles on this subject. This is no joke!

So John, please do not try to deprive us here on CF of occasionally indulging in a little healthy behavior - it is a life extension issue

Cheers,

FD
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