Alcor denies recent media allegations

Alcor denies recent media allegations

Joined: March 29th, 2008, 4:17 pm

October 4th, 2009, 12:36 am #1

Posted here:
http://www.alcor.org/press/index.html

October 2, 2009: The Alcor Life Extension Foundation denies the outrageous allegations against it that have appeared in the media this week. Alcor especially denies mistreating the remains of baseball great Ted Williams. Larry Johnson, the ex Alcor staff member who made these allegations, was not employed at Alcor when Williams was cryopreserved. Johnson's previous attempts to profit from sensational and unfounded allegations against Alcor recently resulted in a court order prohibiting him from making further statements about Alcor. "Alcor is actively pursuing litigation regarding these allegations," says Alcor Executive Director, Jennifer Chapman.

And more here:
http://www.alcor.org/Library/html/sportsillustrated.htm

Copy of court order here:
http://www.alcor.org/Library/pdfs/DefaultJudgment.pdf
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Joined: October 2nd, 2004, 8:27 pm

October 4th, 2009, 4:40 am #2

If only his posts had made it to the daily digest, Alcor might have listened and been saved from departing from its past dark and secluded ways, alas.

While I am on the topic, though, I will just say that while it is admirable that Jennifer CEO has dared such a pronouncement, what it includes is totally distasteful - that which brings up imagings of "book burning" (a concept likely too difficult for her to grasp). This is the US of A, and do we have freedom of speech, including the right to read books and decide for ourselves if we want to believe what is in them, or not?

FD
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Joined: October 2nd, 2004, 8:27 pm

October 4th, 2009, 4:42 am #3

Posted here:
http://www.alcor.org/press/index.html

October 2, 2009: The Alcor Life Extension Foundation denies the outrageous allegations against it that have appeared in the media this week. Alcor especially denies mistreating the remains of baseball great Ted Williams. Larry Johnson, the ex Alcor staff member who made these allegations, was not employed at Alcor when Williams was cryopreserved. Johnson's previous attempts to profit from sensational and unfounded allegations against Alcor recently resulted in a court order prohibiting him from making further statements about Alcor. "Alcor is actively pursuing litigation regarding these allegations," says Alcor Executive Director, Jennifer Chapman.

And more here:
http://www.alcor.org/Library/html/sportsillustrated.htm

Copy of court order here:
http://www.alcor.org/Library/pdfs/DefaultJudgment.pdf
1) How did TW's head get stuck in a fish can?

2) Who was the idiot that caused that?

3) Who was the "technician" who allegedly misused a monkey wrench to displace the head from the can? Or was it displace the can from the head?

Wait, that wasn't two was it. Well, 1 and 1 don't always add up to 2 in cryonics, why should any other math work.

Cheers,

FD
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Joined: March 3rd, 2005, 2:52 am

October 4th, 2009, 4:50 am #4

If only his posts had made it to the daily digest, Alcor might have listened and been saved from departing from its past dark and secluded ways, alas.

While I am on the topic, though, I will just say that while it is admirable that Jennifer CEO has dared such a pronouncement, what it includes is totally distasteful - that which brings up imagings of "book burning" (a concept likely too difficult for her to grasp). This is the US of A, and do we have freedom of speech, including the right to read books and decide for ourselves if we want to believe what is in them, or not?

FD
I'll try to sneak out of here tomorrow to pick it up.

One of my contacts at the lab said that people have called in and left death threats in their voice mail boxes. I offered a refuge for this individual in the Venturist cult compound for a few days if things get too scary.
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Joined: October 2nd, 2004, 8:27 pm

October 4th, 2009, 5:30 am #5

Knowing this, unpee esq. will probably be on the phone to them at 8 am posing as a legalbeagle for Alcor, demanding the immediate burning of all LJ books in their possession. Argument? -- who needs a frickin' Constitution anyway?

Cheers,

FD
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Joined: August 9th, 2006, 2:07 am

October 4th, 2009, 4:12 pm #6

1) How did TW's head get stuck in a fish can?

2) Who was the idiot that caused that?

3) Who was the "technician" who allegedly misused a monkey wrench to displace the head from the can? Or was it displace the can from the head?

Wait, that wasn't two was it. Well, 1 and 1 don't always add up to 2 in cryonics, why should any other math work.

Cheers,

FD
I would have left the head on that can... given that it was on the prop for a reason in the first place. Once stuck, leave it. Unstick with nanobots later. Very minor problem dealt with unneccesarily. Given Ted was an avid fisherman, I'm sure it also would have been appropriate in cryonics humorland to have left that can in place.

Here's Ted fishing in 1950


Another better question would be "didn't the Alcor guy know how to use a pipe wrench?". Here is a pipe wrench...



Here's a tuna can...



You can imagine a frozen head, as this photo attempts to illustrate, on the tuna can base. Given this picture, imagine applying that wrench to the problem of separating the head from the tuna can. What would a thinking person do? Would he attempt to use the pipe wrench like a bat?



Obviously the pipe wrench has peculiar possibilities that put it in a category different than the bat. If Alcor had had a bat in their lab, I could see how the solution the problem might involve blunt striking. However, as the reader can plainly see, the pipe wrench could have used to grasp the can, and then careful torque might have been applied to it or the head, the twisting motion resulting in neuroseparation from the tune can. Voila.

Here's a plumber using a pipe wrench properly on a sink drain pipe. The tuna can would represent the pipe, and the sink would be Ted's head in this example.



Given Hugh is an engineer, I doubt it would have been him. Given SA "participated" in that case, I would look to the unqualified people with SA at the time for who exactly tried to hit the tuna can out of the ballpark.

That's my analysis so far. If the mainstream media wishes to obtain more from me, please ask your qeustion here on Cold Filter. I do not do exclusive interviews. Thanks.





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Joined: October 2nd, 2004, 8:27 pm

October 4th, 2009, 5:37 pm #7

1) How did TW's head get stuck in a fish can?

2) Who was the idiot that caused that?

3) Who was the "technician" who allegedly misused a monkey wrench to displace the head from the can? Or was it displace the can from the head?

Wait, that wasn't two was it. Well, 1 and 1 don't always add up to 2 in cryonics, why should any other math work.

Cheers,

FD
Buried in this otherwise sensationalist piece:
http://sports.yahoo.com/mlb/news?slug=g ... &type=lgns
-------

Polidoro said he used some of the material Johnson shared with him in another novel, Brain Freeze, in which a fictional Negro League star is frozen in the same manner. But Polidoro says that Johnson did not reveal to him some of Frozens most stunning revelations. Johnson wrote that two workers used a monkey wrench to try to wrest Williams frozen head from its pedestal, a Bumble Bee tuna can.

Little gray chunks of Teds head flew off, peppering the walls, skittering across the floor and sliding under the machinery, Johnson wrote in Frozen: My Journey Into the World of Cryonics, Deception and Death.

Polidoro said the can was attached to the head to monitor for cracking sounds in the brain during the freezing process. Microphones are placed in the brain tissue and can be heard through the can.

They must have been trying to remove [the can] for some reason after it was frozen to the skin, and used a monkey wrench, Polidoro said. I have pictures of the final process with this can on the head of people. It is, or resembles, a tuna can with wires coming out of it. Absurd procedure.
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Joined: April 30th, 2006, 1:38 am

October 4th, 2009, 5:46 pm #8

...name a piece of equipment a "crackphone," in this day and age? Seriously. Just goes to prove my theory about the rarity of common sense, in cryonics.

And a tuna fish can???Give me a break. I never saw anything like that, in heart surgery! What a bunch of clowns.
Last edited by melmax on October 4th, 2009, 5:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: August 9th, 2006, 2:07 am

October 4th, 2009, 5:57 pm #9

AbstractEngineering solutions to unique problems in new systems often require makeshift and/or emergency arrangements depending on unpredicted circumstance. The unique case of the cryopreservation of baseball hero Ted Williams presented such circumstances for various reasons. In the case of the elevating of the neuro component submitted for preservation, it turned out that the ordinary tuna can presented a solution for a problem that arose in the processing of this case. In general, engineers are often found to solve complex problems with simple every day ordinary implements. The TV drama McGuyver is often used as a reference point for this type of on-the-spur thinking. The tuna can solution was likely ingenious, the fault being the improper use of the pipe wrench as a baseball bat..

To Maxim-- I think the criticism of the use of the tuna can without knowing the circumstances is unjust.


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Joined: August 9th, 2006, 2:07 am

October 4th, 2009, 7:42 pm #10

...name a piece of equipment a "crackphone," in this day and age? Seriously. Just goes to prove my theory about the rarity of common sense, in cryonics.

And a tuna fish can???Give me a break. I never saw anything like that, in heart surgery! What a bunch of clowns.
I would think that if High INVENTED the crackphone that he would KNOW when to use a tuna fish can... and when NOT to... or what modifications would be required for a severed head.

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Hugh is the inventor of the "crackphone", a device which determines cracking temperature and degree of cracking, first with glycerol perfusion, and now with new cryoprotectant and vitrification systems. He is the initial fabricator of the Bigfoot Patient Pod System and modified the MVE Bigfoot dewar design for simpler manufacture. Hugh designed and was instrumental in constructing the Patient Care LN2 Bulk Fill System, in addition to conceiving, designing, and constructing the LN2 Vacuum Transfer System and the LN2 Vapor Cloud Extractor. He is the designer and builder of the Mobile Advanced Rescue Cart (MARC), and was involved in the construction of its predecessor, the Cryovita Labs Mobile Advanced Life Support System (MALSS).
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http://www.alcor.org/AboutAlcor/meetalcorstaff.html
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