Thursday watch; a very Red Chinese...

Thursday watch; a very Red Chinese...

Joined: May 5th, 2009, 1:22 pm

May 5th, 2011, 2:04 am #1

(are we still doing Chinese?)

Today I'm wearing an example of that curiously Chinese feature, the deep lacquer dial. In this instance it is a Beijing ZB-1 Shuangling.



This has over the years become a bit of a frankenwatch. The movement is a Tianjin Jin Zhong STZ-1, except the mainspring barrel which is from a Liaoning ZLN. It's this kind of interchangeability that vindicates the Tongji development program; one watch for a nation, made identically in dozens of factories.

The bracelet is a cheap Hong Kong piece, but I think it perfectly complements the colourful dial.


Nothing like a bit of red to get that authentic Chinese look





Does anybody else have a lacquer dial Chinese they would like to show off?
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Joined: February 28th, 2006, 10:40 pm

May 5th, 2011, 2:07 am #2

I have two I am going to wear tomorrow. I am just about to take and upload the pics...

Oh, and even though next week is Japanese Watch Week; Chinese watches are welcome. The AWF is re-visiting its roots...
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Joined: February 28th, 2006, 10:40 pm

May 5th, 2011, 3:09 am #3

Two vintage Shanghai handwinds. Peter also did some TLC on these as well...

What can you guys tell me about them?






Again, vintage Chinese mechanicals have such interesting casebacks...






There they are flanking the Sea-Gull ST5 handwind I am finishing Wednesday with...


Info on Shanghai can be found here on the Chinese Watch Wiki:
http://www.tractionink.com/watch_wiki/i ... ch_Factory

Do you think these guys are A581 or A611 powered?

Info from the Chinese Watch Wiki:

"Prior to 1955, watch manufacturing in China consisted of importing complete movements and installing them in locally made cases. This activity was largely confined to the city of Shanghai. With external sources of movements disappearing after the revolution, the Shanghai Light Industry Bureau and the Shanghai Watch Industry Association organized 58 enterprises to participate in a project to develop an entirely Chinese-made watch. Trial production occurred between 1955 and 1957, until the quality was adequate to justify full production. The 17 jewel, centre-second design was based on the Swiss AS 1187, and these first trial watches bore the names 'He Ping' (Peace) and 'Dong Fang Hong' (The East is Red). China's first watch factory, the Shanghai Watch Factory was completed in 1958, and production commenced of the A581 watch, introducing the brand Shanghai. The logo was the Chinese characters for Shanghai rendered as a stylized block. This was later replaced by a calligraphic style which has endured to the present.

The A581 continued in production until 1968, supplemented by the shockproof A611 from 1961. Other variants of this basic design were trialled during this period. A date version A623 never entered full production, but was worn my Premier Zhou Enlai. More advanced designs were also prototyped and the factory also offered technical support to the Qingdao Watch Factory. In 1968, the Shanghai Watch Factory's production capacity was greatly increased by the installation of temporary mezzanine levels. These were to remain in place for 20 years. At this time the Shanghai Watch Factory was China's biggest watch producer."

Wrist pics:


Signed crown! Yay! Zoodles loves signed crowns...










What can you guys tell me about these two interesting mechanicals?

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Joined: October 25th, 2005, 9:59 pm

May 5th, 2011, 3:11 am #4

(are we still doing Chinese?)

Today I'm wearing an example of that curiously Chinese feature, the deep lacquer dial. In this instance it is a Beijing ZB-1 Shuangling.



This has over the years become a bit of a frankenwatch. The movement is a Tianjin Jin Zhong STZ-1, except the mainspring barrel which is from a Liaoning ZLN. It's this kind of interchangeability that vindicates the Tongji development program; one watch for a nation, made identically in dozens of factories.

The bracelet is a cheap Hong Kong piece, but I think it perfectly complements the colourful dial.


Nothing like a bit of red to get that authentic Chinese look





Does anybody else have a lacquer dial Chinese they would like to show off?
""
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Joined: January 19th, 2010, 10:45 pm

May 5th, 2011, 3:20 am #5

(are we still doing Chinese?)

Today I'm wearing an example of that curiously Chinese feature, the deep lacquer dial. In this instance it is a Beijing ZB-1 Shuangling.



This has over the years become a bit of a frankenwatch. The movement is a Tianjin Jin Zhong STZ-1, except the mainspring barrel which is from a Liaoning ZLN. It's this kind of interchangeability that vindicates the Tongji development program; one watch for a nation, made identically in dozens of factories.

The bracelet is a cheap Hong Kong piece, but I think it perfectly complements the colourful dial.


Nothing like a bit of red to get that authentic Chinese look





Does anybody else have a lacquer dial Chinese they would like to show off?
[/IMG]
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Joined: February 28th, 2006, 10:40 pm

May 5th, 2011, 3:21 am #6

""
I like that... Classic cushion cased goodness with the venerable and reliable 7548...
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Joined: May 5th, 2009, 1:22 pm

May 5th, 2011, 3:21 am #7

Two vintage Shanghai handwinds. Peter also did some TLC on these as well...

What can you guys tell me about them?






Again, vintage Chinese mechanicals have such interesting casebacks...






There they are flanking the Sea-Gull ST5 handwind I am finishing Wednesday with...


Info on Shanghai can be found here on the Chinese Watch Wiki:
http://www.tractionink.com/watch_wiki/i ... ch_Factory

Do you think these guys are A581 or A611 powered?

Info from the Chinese Watch Wiki:

"Prior to 1955, watch manufacturing in China consisted of importing complete movements and installing them in locally made cases. This activity was largely confined to the city of Shanghai. With external sources of movements disappearing after the revolution, the Shanghai Light Industry Bureau and the Shanghai Watch Industry Association organized 58 enterprises to participate in a project to develop an entirely Chinese-made watch. Trial production occurred between 1955 and 1957, until the quality was adequate to justify full production. The 17 jewel, centre-second design was based on the Swiss AS 1187, and these first trial watches bore the names 'He Ping' (Peace) and 'Dong Fang Hong' (The East is Red). China's first watch factory, the Shanghai Watch Factory was completed in 1958, and production commenced of the A581 watch, introducing the brand Shanghai. The logo was the Chinese characters for Shanghai rendered as a stylized block. This was later replaced by a calligraphic style which has endured to the present.

The A581 continued in production until 1968, supplemented by the shockproof A611 from 1961. Other variants of this basic design were trialled during this period. A date version A623 never entered full production, but was worn my Premier Zhou Enlai. More advanced designs were also prototyped and the factory also offered technical support to the Qingdao Watch Factory. In 1968, the Shanghai Watch Factory's production capacity was greatly increased by the installation of temporary mezzanine levels. These were to remain in place for 20 years. At this time the Shanghai Watch Factory was China's biggest watch producer."

Wrist pics:


Signed crown! Yay! Zoodles loves signed crowns...










What can you guys tell me about these two interesting mechanicals?
regarded by some as the quintessential Chinese watch. Made in the 1970s. The movement should be SS7, the first version of the Tongji/Standard movement from the Shanghai Watch Factory, and built to a higher than usual standard.
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Joined: February 28th, 2006, 10:40 pm

May 5th, 2011, 3:26 am #8

Once I step away from Sea-Gull my Chinese watch knowledge takes a nosedive...

Perhaps I should get into Shanghai watches a bit more...

From the Chinese Watch Wiki:

"With the successful developement of the Chinese Standard movement and its trial production by the Shanghai 2nd Watch Factory, production commenced of the Standard design by the Shanghai Watch Factory, bearing the familiar 'Shaghai' brand. These early watches with the movement designated SS7, were of the higher quality than the later ZSH watches. '7 Series' Shanghais are popular with collectors. Calendar and automatic versions followed. An export-focussed brand Chunlei was created for watches using a variety of Shanghai and other movements."

I think it would be cool to get a modern Shanghai to complement the three vintage ones I own...

DO you think both of these are from similar time periods? They sure seem like fraternal twins...
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Joined: October 25th, 2005, 9:59 pm

May 5th, 2011, 3:29 am #9

[/IMG]
get his ZERO model going and up for sale! same Noah case and movement but Jake's own options....priced around $350!!! He should have his optional bezels, dials and hands in this week, he said....
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Joined: November 24th, 2007, 4:36 am

May 5th, 2011, 3:46 am #10

(are we still doing Chinese?)

Today I'm wearing an example of that curiously Chinese feature, the deep lacquer dial. In this instance it is a Beijing ZB-1 Shuangling.



This has over the years become a bit of a frankenwatch. The movement is a Tianjin Jin Zhong STZ-1, except the mainspring barrel which is from a Liaoning ZLN. It's this kind of interchangeability that vindicates the Tongji development program; one watch for a nation, made identically in dozens of factories.

The bracelet is a cheap Hong Kong piece, but I think it perfectly complements the colourful dial.


Nothing like a bit of red to get that authentic Chinese look





Does anybody else have a lacquer dial Chinese they would like to show off?


poywatch aka Boomtown
Watch Agent 007--Licensed to kill time
Education:BS WIS
University: Watch Amata U.
Fraternity: Alpha Zuan Omega

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