Newberryi or not

Joined: August 14th, 2018, 6:29 pm

August 16th, 2018, 3:05 pm #1

I hope one of you guys can help me here.

I got Triops eggs 20 years ago. Back then, no-one I came across was even talking about Newberryi - all eggs were, it seemed, longicaudatus or Cancriformis (or Australiensis, if you sepnt enough money) - so I was pretty sure what I had was longicaudatus.

However, My Triops are always very proficient and active swimmers, which doesn't really fit the behaviour I've seen of longicaudatus. So, recently, I went looking again at breeds, and figured they might actually be Newberryi.

Can anyone give me a more definite answer?


(best photo I have - they don't sit still for long enough to photograph!)
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notostracan
Triops Newberryi
notostracan
Triops Newberryi
Joined: June 16th, 2016, 9:06 pm

August 28th, 2018, 12:03 am #2

Not a bad pic! It just looks like T.longicaudatus and most likely is, there are lots of different strains from different locations around the US and rest of the world, they behave differently depending on the temperature, oxygen content, population density and food availability, etc, so behavior is not a good way to distinguish between species. T.longicaudatus can be very active swimmers :thumbup: .

Without DNA sequencing or knowing the source of the cysts, nobody here is going to be able to tell for sure which species you have. It may be possible to get more of an idea if you spend a couple of hours going over research papers and counting tail segments and other tiny features using much more detailed photographs or a specimen under a microscope.
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Joined: August 14th, 2018, 6:29 pm

August 28th, 2018, 3:52 am #3

notostracan wrote:Not a bad pic! It just looks like T.longicaudatus and most likely is, there are lots of different strains from different locations around the US and rest of the world, they behave differently depending on the temperature, oxygen content, population density and food availability, etc, so behavior is not a good way to distinguish between species. T.longicaudatus can be very active swimmers :thumbup: .

Without DNA sequencing or knowing the source of the cysts, nobody here is going to be able to tell for sure which species you have. It may be possible to get more of an idea if you spend a couple of hours going over research papers and counting tail segments and other tiny features using much more detailed photographs or a specimen under a microscope.
Thanks Noto. :thumbup:

Honestly, the more research I do in to these little buggers, the less it seems that science actually knows about them for sure! I've managed to find resources that say my Triops definitely *are* Newberryi, and others that say they are definitely *not* Newberryi :P
Given that Newberryi and Longicaudatus seem so similar, I'm not really sure it matters :)

I'd like to be more sure of other breeds I get hold of, however, so I'll have to find a good supplier for my next ones - once I decide if they should be Cancriformis, or Australiensis.
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