taiwan_girl
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January 5th, 2018, 12:42 am #21

Just curious as to what people here think. I will admit that I have never tried marijuana. But, my very small understanding is that it is about equivalent to alcohol. Too much excess of either will lead to problems. Having abuse for the long term can lead to problems.

But, is it really that much worse than alcohol that it is under strict laws in the US?
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George K
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January 5th, 2018, 12:51 am #22

taiwan_girl wrote:But, is it really that much worse than alcohol that it is under strict laws in the US?
I don't have a strong opinion.

However, a couple of things:

1) There seems to be reasonably good evidence that cannabis (CBD, not THC) is helpful in many medical conditions - chronic pain, neurologic disorders, etc.

2) See Mik's link on the effect of legalizing weed in Colorado. Granted, it seems to be from a biased author, but I think his analysis bears examination, if nothing else, to see what that legalizations effect on society is.

3) Do we need to legalize *another* intoxicant? The reasons for using marijuana fall into one of two camps: medical and recreational. If you're using it to become intoxicated, what's to keep you from becoming a menace on the roads, etc? If society accepts the use of chemicals for intoxication, so be it. Of course, the question is, which line do we draw?
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Copper
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January 5th, 2018, 1:02 am #23

George K wrote: 3) Do we need to legalize *another* intoxicant?
Maybe we'll see Anheuser Busch putting a little weed in their brew.

The Confederate soldier was peculiar in that he was ever ready to fight, but never ready to submit to the routine duty and discipline of the camp or the march. The soldiers were determined to be soldiers after their own notions, and do their duty, for the love of it, as they thought best. Carlton McCarthy
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George K
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January 5th, 2018, 3:37 am #24

Shot:



Chaser:


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George K
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January 8th, 2018, 2:28 pm #25

To legislators complaining: Do your job.
wrote:People such as Sen. Cory Gardner, R-Colo., who exploded in response to Sessions’ announcement, saying that marijuana laws should be left to the states, and who vowed to “take all steps necessary” to secure a reversal of Sessions’ announcement, including holding up nominees to the Department of Justice.

Many other members of Congress — from Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., to Rep. Ted Lieu, D-Calif., were also critical. But if you want to leave marijuana decisions up to the states, there’s an easy way to do that: Repeal the federal marijuana law. Legislate, which is supposed to be the job of ... legislators. Like Gardner, Sanders or Lieu.

There’s even a bill in front of Congress to do just that, HR 975, the Respect State Marijuana Laws Act, introduced by Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, R-Calif., in 2017. It has bipartisan sponsorship, divided roughly evenly between Republicans and Democrats.

So why are Gardner, et al. attacking Sessions instead of speaking out in favor of new legislation?

Well, for one thing, it’s easy. Passing bills is work, denouncing Sessions requires only a press release — or in this case, a few tweets.

It’s also safer. Congress has been surprisingly willing to let the executive branch take over its lawmaking functions through regulatory measures, executive orders and “prosecutorial discretion.” That’s because then the executive branch takes the blame, while members of Congress don’t have to take a stand.

And it’s for that reason that, even though I favor marijuana legalization, I approve of what Sessions has done. He’s basically told Congress that if they don’t like the marijuana laws that are on the books, they need to get off their butts and change them. As an executive official, he’s telling the legislative branch that he’s going to respect the constitutional separation of powers, which means that if the law is changed it will have to be changed by the lawmakers.

As reported in Politico, Sessions’ action may make the legalization of marijuana more likely, as a lot of legislators who have been trying to have it both ways are forced to take a position. Sen. Patrick Leahy, D-Vt., for example, who refused to discuss his position on marijuana legalization with Politico “just a few weeks ago,” is now pledging to fight for legalization.

And he’s not alone. Marijuana means jobs and tax revenues in many states, and if the Justice Department won’t promise to ignore the federal law, there will be a lot of pressure on Congress to change the law.

And that’s exactly how the system is supposed to work. Members of Congress would rather have it both ways, of course, because they’re politicians and talking out of both sides of their mouths is standard procedure. But we get better government when people have to take a stand, and face the voters. Looks like that’s going to happen here, for which we can thank Attorney General Sessions.
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George K
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April 15th, 2018, 3:55 pm #26

https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics ... 9053815183
wrote:President Trump has promised a top Senate Republican that he will support congressional efforts to protect states that have legalized marijuana — defusing a months-long standoff between Sen. Cory Gardner and the administration over Justice Department nominees.

In January, the Colorado Republican said he would block all DOJ nominations after Attorney General Jeff Sessions issued a memo that heightened the prospect of a federal marijuana crackdown in states that had legalized the substance. Gardner’s home state made recreational marijuana legal in 2014.

In a phone call late Wednesday, Trump told Gardner that despite the DOJ memo, the marijuana industry in Colorado will not be targeted, the senator said in a statement Friday. Satisfied, the first-term senator is now backing down from his nominee blockade.

“Since the campaign, President Trump has consistently supported states’ rights to decide for themselves how best to approach marijuana,” Gardner said Friday. “Late Wednesday, I received a commitment from the President that the Department of Justice’s rescission of the Cole memo will not impact Colorado’s legal marijuana industry.”

He added: “Furthermore, President Trump has assured me that he will support a federalism-based legislative solution to fix this states’ rights issue once and for all. Because of these commitments, I have informed the Administration that I will be lifting my remaining holds on Department of Justice nominees.”

Gardner, who heads the campaign operation charged with hanging on to the Republicans’ Senate majority, was irate in January when Sessions revoked guidance from the Obama administration, known as the Cole memo, that had discouraged prosecutors from enforcing federal marijuana laws in states that had legalized the drug.

Especially infuriating, from Gardner’s perspective, was that Sessions had pledged during his confirmation process for attorney general he would leave states that had legalized marijuana alone, according to the senator.

The January memo from Sessions stated prosecutors should use their discretion in weighing whether charges were warranted, rather than abiding by the Obama-era guidance.

Trump has held a sharply different view from Sessions on the issue. During the presidential campaign, Trump said in an interview with KUSA-TV in Colorado that he said “it’s up to the states” on the marijuana issue.

Trump “does respect Colorado’s right to decide for themselves how to best approach this issue,” White House legislative affairs director Marc Short said in an interview Friday.

Gardner held up about 20 Justice nominees, a significant number considering Senate Republicans and the White House have for months accused Democrats of slowing down consideration of other Trump picks.
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jon-nyc
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April 15th, 2018, 4:40 pm #27

That seems like the right direction.
Clowns to the left of me, jokers to the right.
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Mikhailoh
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April 15th, 2018, 4:44 pm #28

You can hardly say that you didn't know, given that he had taken that position during confirmation.

Same goes for DACA - you want it? Legislate it.
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