The Interesting Maps Thread

Kyng
Rank 12
Joined: December 3rd, 2009, 10:33 am

December 4th, 2016, 1:43 pm #1

Here's a thread for the map geeks. Simply post any interesting maps you find here - whether they be physical, political, economic, or whatever else that takes your fancy :P . (Of course, a thread like this will cover content that could sensibly go in several different forums - but this one seemed like the best compromise!)

I'll start with this view of what the Moon would look like if it were to be terraformed, by 1Wyrmshadow1. The full-size image is massive - so I'll just post a thumbnail-sized version, and link you to the original on his DeviantArt page:

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Kyng
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Joined: December 3rd, 2009, 10:33 am

December 10th, 2016, 3:32 pm #2

Here's one I saw a while back that I thought was amusing. It's the global geographic distribution of the common rat:


(Click to enlarge)

The message is clear: If you can't stand rats, then move to Alberta!
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Kyng
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Joined: December 3rd, 2009, 10:33 am

January 12th, 2017, 6:18 pm #3

Okay, this next map is one I put together myself. I didn't really have anywhere else to put it, and here seemed like the most appropriate place: it's up to you to judge whether it qualifies as 'interesting' :P .

So, you're probably familiar with the Eurovision Song Contest. The idea is that each country in Europe who wishes to participate (plus a couple of non-European invitees) nominates an artist to perform a song, and then all of the participating countries award points to the ones they liked the best (other than their own). Each country has two separate sets of points to award: a panel of judges from each country awards points to their ten favourites (on a 12-10-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1 scale), and each country holds a televote among its citizens (with the ten countries that received the most votes also scoring points, again on a 12-10-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1 scale).

Now, I'm fine with the judge's points: they can stay as the are. I'm not so sure about the televoting points, though: getting the most votes in Russia (Estimated population: 144,221,341) is worth as much as getting the most votes in San Marino (Estimated population: 33,285). Perhaps winning the bigger countries should earn a bigger prize?

Now, in the 2017 contest, 43 teams will be participating. Since every country gives 12 points for 1st place, that would be 43 x 12 = 516 first-place points in total. But, what if I instead split those points up Electoral College-style? That is, I give each country 3 first-place points to award, and then split the rest up according to population. This is how many points winning the televote in each country would be worth:



A few comments on this:
  • It's not just the first-place votes that need to be split: the votes for 2nd-10th places would need to be split in a similar fashion. This could get complicated.
  • As mentioned above, countries aren't allowed to vote for themselves. With the current system, this is the same for everyone: everyone's forbidden from receiving their own 12 first-place votes, so nobody's at a disadvantage. On the other hand, with this system, Malta is forbidden from giving itself 3 first-place votes, whereas Russia is forbidden from giving itself 77 first-place votes. Doesn't this put larger countries at a disadvantage?
  • From 2015 onwards, Australia was invited to participate. What if the next guest country is India or China? Either country would completely screw up this system, as each one has a population greater than the rest of the competitors combined. Perhaps there would need to be a hard cap on the number of first-place votes a particular country can have (say, 100).
  • Perhaps more to the point, I'm not sure how well this system meets the aims of the Eurovision Song Contest to begin with. Their aims seem to be more about transcending cultural boundaries than about winning over the most people. (That being said, some of these countries have a lot of cultural diversity within their own borders: Russia has a whole load of indigenous groups with populations greater than that of San Marino....)
Oh well, I'm not trying to make a serious case for this system here: it's really just me having a bit of fun :P !
Last edited by Kyng on January 12th, 2017, 8:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Pyrite
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Joined: December 24th, 2009, 12:53 pm

January 13th, 2017, 12:59 am #4

Wow, that's quite a curious system! I'm not sure how much of a fan I am of electoral college style voting, but hey, if they're going to try it out on anything in Europe, they might as well try it out on Eurovision :P

Also, I'm so moving to Alberta. Rats aren't my favourite animals!!!
CJ wrote:Also, you can solve walls faster than [Donald Trump] can build them.
So there's that.
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Kyng
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Joined: December 3rd, 2009, 10:33 am

February 7th, 2017, 8:45 pm #5

Here's an 'upside-down' map of the world:


(Source: http://www.deceptology.com/2010/04/upsi ... is-up.html)

The first time I saw it (at school, in my Geography teacher's office), I thought it was some kind of weird novelty item. Over time, however, I've come to prefer it over the standard world maps with North at the top, and the Prime Meridian in the centre. Instead of sticking Americas on one side, with thousands of kilometres of ocean separating them from Eurasia and Africa, it shows how all of the continents are linked together, either directly by land or by chains of islands. It's as though there's an implicit message in this: all of humanity is connected.

(Granted, it shoves the United Kingdom off into a corner, and makes us look small and insignificant, but I think that's a small price to pay for the above. Besides, we've had plenty of time looking powerful and important in the middle of world maps. It's time to give someone else - for example, Australia - a turn :P !)

(And, yes, I know it's a few years out of date - but that shouldn't detract from the basic idea here!)
Last edited by Kyng on February 7th, 2017, 8:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Kyng
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Joined: December 3rd, 2009, 10:33 am

March 5th, 2017, 7:36 pm #6

How to say 'Beer' in every country in Europe:


(Click to enlarge; Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/map-how- ... 013-7?IR=T)

Why do we need so many different words for it in the UK :P ?
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Jarkko
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Joined: March 2nd, 2012, 1:16 am

March 5th, 2017, 7:42 pm #7

Interesting how Bulgarian is the only Slavic language that doesn't use something resembling "pivo." Even its closest relative, Macedonian, is on the Slavic bandwagon. :P

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CJ wrote:
Jarkko wrote:I noticed the blue colouring wasn't applied to Vancouver Island, though. :P
I suppose they think you've been spending more time on the Wikipedia for some obscure Uralic language I've never heard of, than everyone else combined has been spending on the English-language Wikipedia (even if we only count the time you've been on Vancouver Island :lol: !)
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Nick
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Joined: June 15th, 2017, 11:00 pm

August 7th, 2017, 11:05 pm #8

The most commonly used languages used around the world, sourced from 100B conversations.



EDIT: Found another.

Last edited by Nick on August 7th, 2017, 11:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Kyng
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Joined: December 3rd, 2009, 10:33 am

August 7th, 2017, 11:16 pm #9

Wow, I'm surprised there isn't more interest in the eclipse in Illinois, given that it actually passes through the southern part of the state! (I'm guessing people from Chicago just aren't interested, and that's skewing the statistics?)

I love that linguistic map - although, it looks as though North Korea isn't very talkative :( .....
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Nick
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Joined: June 15th, 2017, 11:00 pm

August 7th, 2017, 11:29 pm #10

CJ wrote:Wow, I'm surprised there isn't more interest in the eclipse in Illinois, given that it actually passes through the southern part of the state! (I'm guessing people from Chicago just aren't interested, and that's skewing the statistics?)
Sounds likely. When it comes to grouping even somewhat different groups of people together, (in this case, Illinois) I think we underestimate how much the smaller population groups within that larger group can vary. See below:


(source)

Your hypothesis appears correct.
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