Same Spirit, Same Power

Same Spirit, Same Power

daily word
daily word

April 3rd, 2012, 2:27 pm #1

TODAY'S SCRIPTURE

"And if the Spirit of Him Who raised up Jesus from the dead dwells in you, [then] He Who raised up Christ Jesus from the dead will also restore to life your mortal (short-lived, perishable) bodies through His Spirit Who dwells in you"
(Romans 8:11, AMP)



TODAY'S WORD from Joel and Victoria

When you accept Jesus as your Lord and Savior, the Bible tells us that the Holy Spirit makes His home inside of you. That's God Himself, the same Spirit with the same power that raised Jesus from the dead! His resurrection power can bring back health, strength and life to your physical body. He can restore hope and breathe life into your dreams. In fact, He can resurrect any area that may seem dormant on the inside of you!

The next time you feel overwhelmed by sickness, challenges or despair, remember, the same Spirit that raised Christ from the dead dwells in you through Christ Jesus. You may have been burdened by an addiction, fear or worry, but there's nothing that can stand against the power of God. Rise up and declare by faith, "He whom the Son sets free is free indeed. I am restored and healed in the name of Jesus! No weapon formed against me can prosper!" Receive His truth, declare the Word, and activate His power within you!



A PRAYER FOR TODAY

Father in heaven, thank You for filling me with Your power by the Holy Spirit. I choose to feed my faith by declaring Your Word. I choose to walk in Your ways and honor You in everything I do in Jesus'
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insights
insights

April 3rd, 2012, 2:29 pm #2

by Charles R. Swindoll

Read 2 Corinthians 4:4--7


Does it surprise you that being a servant of God is perilous?

To some folks, serving others sounds as safe and harmless as a poached egg on a plate. What could possibly be perilous about it? Plenty.

As we examine Paul's words in the fourth chapter of 2 Corinthians, I'd like to suggest several familiar misconceptions regarding servanthood. Read verses four through seven carefully:

The god of this world has blinded the minds of the unbelieving so that they might not see the light of the gospel of the glory of Christ, who is the image of God. For we do not preach ourselves but Christ Jesus as Lord, and ourselves as your bond-servants for Jesus' sake. For God, who said, "Light shall shine out of darkness," is the One who has shone in our hearts to give the Light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Christ. But we have this treasure in earthen vessels, so that the surpassing greatness of the power will be of God and not from ourselves. (2 Corinthians 4:4--7)

Sounds like servants comprise an elite body of people, doesn't it? They possess a treasure. The "surpassing greatness" of God's power pours out of their lives. But when you look closely, you detect that all of that is of God, not themselves.

This introduces us to misconception number one: servants have special powers in themselves. How very easy it is to look at God's servants through rose-colored glasses! It's almost as if they possess a mystical, divine unction or some angelic "mantle" that causes them to ooze with supernatural, heaven-sent power. But this is wrong! Look at an earlier verse:

Not that we are adequate in ourselves to consider anything as coming from ourselves, but our adequacy is from God. (2 Corinthians 3:5)

They have no special powers in themselves. Tomorrow, I'll offer a couple of more misconceptions.

But for now, mark it well: servants are absolutely human, filled with all the weaknesses and potential for failure that characterize every other human being.


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GOD bless u :)
GOD bless u :)

April 3rd, 2012, 2:30 pm #3

by Charles R. Swindoll

Read 2 Corinthians 4:8--11


Yesterday, we learned that God's servants have no special powers in themselves. Thinking they do is our first misconception. Our adequacy comes from God alone.

Another misconception is that servants don't struggle with everyday problems. To set that straight, let's consider 2 Corinthians 4:8--9:

We are afflicted in every way, but not crushed; perplexed, but not despairing; persecuted, but not forsaken; struck down, but not destroyed. (2 Corinthians 4:8--9)

Afflicted. Perplexed. Persecuted. Struck down. These terms reflect the struggles common to all of us. Under stress, confused, pursued, rejected---Paul (and every servant since his day) understands what it means to endure the constant blast of problems. In fact, it is in the crucible that the servant learns to release his or her way for God's way. Servants do indeed struggle with daily difficulties.

A final misconception goes like this: servants are protected against subtle dangers. To correct this error, we need to read verses 10--11:

[We are] always carrying about in the body the dying of Jesus, so that the life of Jesus also may be manifested in our body. For we who live are constantly being delivered over to death for Jesus'; sake, so that the life of Jesus also may be manifested in our mortal flesh. (2 Corinthians 4:10--11)

People who serve God and others "carry about in the body" signs of death---dangers and perils that are undeniable. Subtle and silent, these dangers lurk in the most unexpected places, pleading for satisfaction. The true servant is vulnerable. When the servant stumbles into these traps, it isn't long before he or she is completely ensnared. And it seldom happens fast or boldly. Usually, it comes on the scene in another garb entirely, appearing to be anything but dangerous.

So let's not be misled, servants of God, no matter how useful, godly, unselfish, and admirable you think you are; we are every bit as human and subject to the perils of life as any other person on earth.


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