What is the difference between Jehovah and Yahweh?

What is the difference between Jehovah and Yahweh?

Joined: February 11th, 2016, 11:16 pm

April 8th, 2017, 3:21 pm #1

Can someone help me to understand the difference in these two names for God? Why is there a difference in the spelling if they are the representing God?
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William
William

April 9th, 2017, 9:47 pm #2

We do not know exactly how God vocalized, or spoke, his name to Moses. You can actually Google this and find several reasonable articles, all of which contain at least some speculation. However, God did SPEAK, or sound, his name to Moses so it is reasonable for us to attach some sound to his name as well. I happen to agree with those who say that withholding the spoken sound of God's name due to reverence and holiness approaches superstition, but you decide for yourself.

But as to your question, Jehovah is merely one way in which we as 21st Century English speakers vocalize the name of God as represented by the four letters YHWH. The absolute word is the same. The word "Jehovah" was not invented by John Wycliffe, but he is the one who placed it into English use. I am not certain that the actual source of the vowels added to YHWH (a and o) is correct, as most articles will indicate. At the time Wycliffe was doing his translation he was in Germany and also dealing with the sounds of letters from Latin, Greek, and Semitic languages. For instance, in German the word for "yes" is "ja", pronounced "ya." "W" is pronounced like a "v", to know the difference in "I" and "J" may require context. For instance, "Jonathan" is pronounced "Yonathan" in Germanic and Semitic languages. We say "jail", but if you ever go to Williamsburg, VA, you may see the "gaol", pronounced exactly the same.

Paraphrased, the introduction of the NASB says that there is no certain vocalization of "YHWH," and the four letters (the tetragrammaton) have little significance to English readers, and "Jehovah" is now seen as something of a corruption. So the NASB has replaced "YHWH" with "Lord" (capitalized) with a side note to indicate it is the Tetragrammaton.

All in all, not something very important to most, but surely some on this site will disagree and discussion will commence.

William, Guillaume, Liam, Wilhelm. I'm all the same guy.
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Whoops
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April 9th, 2017, 9:53 pm #3

Can someone help me to understand the difference in these two names for God? Why is there a difference in the spelling if they are the representing God?
I should have said that Tyndale used Iehouah instead of Wycliffe's Adonay, and that Tyndale put the word that became Jehovah into English usage. I apologize. Maybe the moderator can edit for me.
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Joined: January 2nd, 2005, 6:45 am

April 9th, 2017, 10:03 pm #4

Can someone help me to understand the difference in these two names for God? Why is there a difference in the spelling if they are the representing God?
[color=#0000FF" size="4" face="times]Dianna, this would me a great long-term study. This is a great question by so many students of the Bible -- reminds me of a book: "Everything You Always Wanted to Know about God (But Were Afraid to Ask)." I think this will require a lot of research: I know there's been a lot of research even among Hebrew scholars. Not to complicate matters, we might want to consider "Elohim" to this study, thus: Jehovah / Yahweh / Elohim

As part of the initial study, I would like to bring up the following factors and stats that hopefully will lead us to an honest study of the subject:

1. In ancient Hebrew with no written vowels, the name of God is spelled YHWH.
2. There are 7 references to Jehovah or Yahweh (יְהוָ֣ה) or (ieue) in the Old Testament.
3. There is not a single reference to Jehovah or Yahweh in the New Testament.
4. However, there are numerous references to God or to the Father in the New Testament, and it is conclusive that Jehovah refers ONLY to God the Father.
5. There is not a single reference to the name of Christ in the Old Testament.
6. There are hundreds of references to Christ in the New Testament. There are numerous reference in the New Testament to (a) the name of Christ; (b) the name of Jesus; (c) the name of Jesus Christ.
7. It is important to study the nature of Christ as the Son of God while we study about God the Father whose name is Jehovah or YHWH/Yahweh in Hebrew.

(NOTE: My observation has been, based on all the scriptural support I'm able to find, that while I disagree with both Dave and Bill in their Trinitarian claim that Jesus is God):

(1) I agree with Dave in stating that Jesus is not the Father -- this is scriptural;
(2) I disagree with Bill in his claim that Jesus the Son is also the Father "because they are one and the same [huh?]" ... and are interchangeable "persons" and expressions.[/color]

______________________

[color=#FF0000" size="3" face="times]In the 1st paragraph, it should state: "... this would make a great long-term study." [d.c.][/color]
Last edited by Donnie.Cruz on April 10th, 2017, 1:17 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: July 29th, 2010, 2:32 pm

April 9th, 2017, 11:28 pm #5

When my parents gave me a name, they grasped that I was one of lots of humanoids. If you give God a name you may make him one of the thousands of gods. I have not heard of people addressing 'Jehovah" in prayer.

Yaho, Yah, Iao are used of pagan gods and God gave His DESCRIPTOR which is not a name as in one of many like Him

Ex. 3:13 And Moses said unto God, Behold, when I come unto the children of Israel, and shall say unto them, The God of your fathers hath sent me unto you; and they shall say to me, What is his name? what shall I say unto them?
Ex. 3:14 And God said unto Moses, I AM THAT I AM: and he said, Thus shalt thou say unto the children of Israel, I AM hath sent me unto you.
Ex. 3:15 And God said MOREOVER unto Moses, Thus shalt thou say unto the children of Israel,
The LORD God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob,
hath sent me unto you: this is my name for ever, and this is my memorial unto all generations.


Is. 26:4 Trust ye in the LORD for ever: for in the LORD JEHOVAH is everlasting strength:

As Donnie noted, Jesus is never identified as Jehovah. Joshua or Jesus are like naming your child JESUS which does not make it the real Jesus. In Isaiah 9:6 and Emmanuel, Jesus is an elohim simply because he has mighty power. He is not THE Lord-God or Jehovah-the only true El.

h3068. Yhwh; from 1961; (the) self-Existent or Eternal; name of God:
h1933 hava meaning to exist.
h1961. hayah, haw-yaw; a primitive root (compare 1933); to exist, i.e. be or become, come to pass (always emphatic,

Jesus was BORN and was not self-existent although his and our spirits are from God.

To prevent theologians from being pagan, God said

I AM The LORD-God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob,hath sent me unto you: this is my name for ever and this is my memorial unto all generations

The command of Jesus was:

Luke 11:2 And he said unto them, When ye pray, SAY, Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed [HOLY] be thy NAME. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, as in heaven, so in earth

Luke 22:42 Saying, Father,



Last edited by Ken.Sublett on April 9th, 2017, 11:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 2nd, 2005, 6:45 am

April 10th, 2017, 1:50 am #6

We do not know exactly how God vocalized, or spoke, his name to Moses. You can actually Google this and find several reasonable articles, all of which contain at least some speculation. However, God did SPEAK, or sound, his name to Moses so it is reasonable for us to attach some sound to his name as well. I happen to agree with those who say that withholding the spoken sound of God's name due to reverence and holiness approaches superstition, but you decide for yourself.

But as to your question, Jehovah is merely one way in which we as 21st Century English speakers vocalize the name of God as represented by the four letters YHWH. The absolute word is the same. The word "Jehovah" was not invented by John Wycliffe, but he is the one who placed it into English use. I am not certain that the actual source of the vowels added to YHWH (a and o) is correct, as most articles will indicate. At the time Wycliffe was doing his translation he was in Germany and also dealing with the sounds of letters from Latin, Greek, and Semitic languages. For instance, in German the word for "yes" is "ja", pronounced "ya." "W" is pronounced like a "v", to know the difference in "I" and "J" may require context. For instance, "Jonathan" is pronounced "Yonathan" in Germanic and Semitic languages. We say "jail", but if you ever go to Williamsburg, VA, you may see the "gaol", pronounced exactly the same.

Paraphrased, the introduction of the NASB says that there is no certain vocalization of "YHWH," and the four letters (the tetragrammaton) have little significance to English readers, and "Jehovah" is now seen as something of a corruption. So the NASB has replaced "YHWH" with "Lord" (capitalized) with a side note to indicate it is the Tetragrammaton.

All in all, not something very important to most, but surely some on this site will disagree and discussion will commence.

William, Guillaume, Liam, Wilhelm. I'm all the same guy.
[color=#0000FF" size="4" face="times]Interesting note from Wikipedia:

Jehovah (/dʒᵻˈhoʊvə/ jə-HOH-və) is a Latinization of the Hebrew יְהֹוָה‎, one vocalization of the Tetragrammaton יהוה‎ (YHWH), the proper name of the God of Israel in the Hebrew Bible. ... that "the English form Jehovah is quite simply an Anglicized form of Yehovah,"[11] and preserves the four Hebrew consonants "YHVH" (with the introduction of the "J" sound in English). Anglicization of Jehovah is underscored.

Thanks, Wilhelm

I'm hearing about the RCC and the JW claims:

Jehovah's Witnesses loathe the Catholic Church and have done everything in their power to strip their church of traces of Catholicism. Despite this, their group's very name contains a Catholic "invention," the name "Jehovah."

Wow! Another Catholic invention????[/color]
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William
William

April 10th, 2017, 5:22 am #7

When my parents gave me a name, they grasped that I was one of lots of humanoids. If you give God a name you may make him one of the thousands of gods. I have not heard of people addressing 'Jehovah" in prayer.

Yaho, Yah, Iao are used of pagan gods and God gave His DESCRIPTOR which is not a name as in one of many like Him

Ex. 3:13 And Moses said unto God, Behold, when I come unto the children of Israel, and shall say unto them, The God of your fathers hath sent me unto you; and they shall say to me, What is his name? what shall I say unto them?
Ex. 3:14 And God said unto Moses, I AM THAT I AM: and he said, Thus shalt thou say unto the children of Israel, I AM hath sent me unto you.
Ex. 3:15 And God said MOREOVER unto Moses, Thus shalt thou say unto the children of Israel,
The LORD God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob,
hath sent me unto you: this is my name for ever, and this is my memorial unto all generations.


Is. 26:4 Trust ye in the LORD for ever: for in the LORD JEHOVAH is everlasting strength:

As Donnie noted, Jesus is never identified as Jehovah. Joshua or Jesus are like naming your child JESUS which does not make it the real Jesus. In Isaiah 9:6 and Emmanuel, Jesus is an elohim simply because he has mighty power. He is not THE Lord-God or Jehovah-the only true El.

h3068. Yhwh; from 1961; (the) self-Existent or Eternal; name of God:
h1933 hava meaning to exist.
h1961. hayah, haw-yaw; a primitive root (compare 1933); to exist, i.e. be or become, come to pass (always emphatic,

Jesus was BORN and was not self-existent although his and our spirits are from God.

To prevent theologians from being pagan, God said

I AM The LORD-God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob,hath sent me unto you: this is my name for ever and this is my memorial unto all generations

The command of Jesus was:

Luke 11:2 And he said unto them, When ye pray, SAY, Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed [HOLY] be thy NAME. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done, as in heaven, so in earth

Luke 22:42 Saying, Father,



I had a very, very Jewish teacher with traditional European education for Old Testament. His pronunciation was "Ya-Ho-Wa", slightly elided, with the Ya roughed to Yah(h rough breathing almost), and the "H" mostly swallowed in the second syllable.

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Joined: February 11th, 2016, 11:16 pm

April 10th, 2017, 9:16 pm #8

Donnie, I needed that book when I was young! I was always afraid of sounding stupid in front of my peers. Perhaps one on one teaching would help some students or at least give them the tools they need. I am so thankful we can access some of the old literature now!
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Joined: July 29th, 2010, 2:32 pm

April 10th, 2017, 9:36 pm #9

Dianna, you are one of the three or four people I have met in my life who wanted to or needed to study be Bible beyond using it as a ploy for preaching or singing.

Ezek. 8:1 And it came to pass in the sixth year, in the sixth month, in the fifth day of the month, as I sat in mine house, and the elders of Judah sat before me, that the hand of the Lord [Adonay] GOD [YHWH] [ fell there upon me.

h136. am emphatic form of 113; the Lord (used as a proper name of God only):—(my) Lord.
h113 adown, aw-done; or (shortened) NOdDa }adon, aw-done; from an unused root (meaning to rule); sovereign, i.e. controller (human or divine):—lord, master, owner. Compare also names beginning with “Adoni-”.

The Adonis-Astarte fertility rite continued in Lebanon into the 5th century AD.

Adonis was Tammuz in Ezekiel 13.

Isn't there some evidence that the full Yehweh or Jehovah is adding the "Adonis" concept? Again, this would be God dissociating Himself from the other gods.
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William
William

April 17th, 2017, 4:29 pm #10

[color=#0000FF" size="4" face="times]Interesting note from Wikipedia:

Jehovah (/dʒᵻˈhoʊvə/ jə-HOH-və) is a Latinization of the Hebrew יְהֹוָה‎, one vocalization of the Tetragrammaton יהוה‎ (YHWH), the proper name of the God of Israel in the Hebrew Bible. ... that "the English form Jehovah is quite simply an Anglicized form of Yehovah,"[11] and preserves the four Hebrew consonants "YHVH" (with the introduction of the "J" sound in English). Anglicization of Jehovah is underscored.

Thanks, Wilhelm

I'm hearing about the RCC and the JW claims:

Jehovah's Witnesses loathe the Catholic Church and have done everything in their power to strip their church of traces of Catholicism. Despite this, their group's very name contains a Catholic "invention," the name "Jehovah."

Wow! Another Catholic invention????[/color]
This is one place where there is an explanation, and how Jehovah's witnesses have adopted what may have been a Catholic invention for God's name. I think, actually, it is less Catholic that a result of "scholars" who happened to be Catholic. Showing how there are always things we can agree upon, I agree with the JW's that the name of God should not be obscured. The points in the following link have been picked up many times without credit, and I am not sure if this link is the original source.

https://www.catholic.com/qa/is-gods-nam ... or-jehovah

What I always found interesting was that when God applied a name to Himself, His name differentiated Him from all other "gods" by deriving his name from "I Am", or "I Exist". The other "gods" do not exist.
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