The Difference Between Praise Songs and Hymns (Kaye Dacus)

Joined: January 2nd, 2005, 6:45 am

January 15th, 2015, 5:44 am #1

Source: Humor, Hope, and Happily Ever Afters (Kaye Dacus)
[color=#000000" size="5" face="times]The Difference Between Praise Songs and Hymns<b></b>[/color]
[color=#000000" size="4" face="times]Sunday, September 14, 2008

I'm a traditionalist when it comes to worship. I prefer hymns, sung from an actual hymnal, to "praise choruses" that (a) no one knows and (b) don't mean anything anyway. Here's a story that was shared with me that illustrates my point:

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

An old farmer went to the city one weekend and attended the big city church. He came home and his wife asked him how it was. "Well," said the farmer, "it was good. They did something different, however. They sang praise choruses instead of hymns."

"Praise choruses?" said his wife. "What are those?"

"Oh, they're OK. They are sort of like hymns, only different," said the farmer.

"Well, what's the difference?" asked his wife.

The farmer said, "Well, it's like this – If I were to say to you "Martha, the cows are in the corn"' – well, that would be a hymn. If on the other hand, I were to say to you:[/color]
<blockquote>[color=#000000" size="4" face="times]Martha, Martha, Martha,
Oh Martha, MARTHA, MARTHA,
the cows, the big cows, the brown cows, the black cows
the white cows, the black and white cows,
the COWS, COWS, COWS
are in the corn,
are in the corn, are in the corn, are in the corn,
the CORN, CORN, CORN.[/color]
[color=#000000" size="4" face="times]Then, if I were to repeat the whole thing two or three times, well, that would be a praise chorus."

The next weekend, his nephew, a young, new Christian from the city came to visit and attended the local church of the small town. He went home and his wife asked him how it was. "Well," said the young man, "it was good. They did something different however. They sang hymns instead of regular songs."

"Hymns?" asked his wife. "What are those?"

"Oh, they're OK. They are sort of like regular songs, only different," said the young man.

"Well, what's the difference?"

The young man said, "Well, it's like this – If I were to say to you 'Martha, the cows are in the corn' – well, that would be a regular song. If on the other hand, I were to say to you:[/color]
[color=#000000" size="4" face="times]'Oh Martha, dear Martha, hear thou my cry
Inclinest thine ear to the words of my mouth
Turn thou thy whole wondrous ear by and by
To the righteous, inimitable, glorious truth.

'For the way of the animals who can explain
There in their heads is no shadow of sense
Hearkenest they in God's sun or His rain
Unless from the mild, tempting corn they are fenced.

'Yea those cows in glad bovine, rebellious delight
Have broke free their shackles, their warm pens eschewed
Then goaded by minions of darkness and night
They all my mild Chilliwack sweet corn have chewed.

'So look to the bright shining day by and by
Where all foul corruptions of earth are reborn
Where no vicious animals make my soul cry
And I no longer see those foul cows in the corn.'[/color]
[color=#000000" size="4" face="times]Then if I were to do only verses one, three and four and do a key change on the last verse, well that would be a hymn.[/color]</blockquote>
[color=#0000FF" size="4" face="times]---------------------
ENJOY!!!
[/color]
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Justly
Justly

January 15th, 2015, 2:36 pm #2


Donnie, I agree with you, the old hymns are my preference also. I can handle an occasional praise song but I will not stand for 20 minutes anymore while the praise songs are performed. Bass guitar, drums, and strobe lights make for a quick exit. We still have a choice of service types but I'm not sure how long that will last. JMHO.
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Joined: July 29th, 2010, 2:32 pm

January 15th, 2015, 4:16 pm #3

Source: Humor, Hope, and Happily Ever Afters (Kaye Dacus)
[color=#000000" size="5" face="times]The Difference Between Praise Songs and Hymns<b></b>[/color]
[color=#000000" size="4" face="times]Sunday, September 14, 2008

I'm a traditionalist when it comes to worship. I prefer hymns, sung from an actual hymnal, to "praise choruses" that (a) no one knows and (b) don't mean anything anyway. Here's a story that was shared with me that illustrates my point:

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

An old farmer went to the city one weekend and attended the big city church. He came home and his wife asked him how it was. "Well," said the farmer, "it was good. They did something different, however. They sang praise choruses instead of hymns."

"Praise choruses?" said his wife. "What are those?"

"Oh, they're OK. They are sort of like hymns, only different," said the farmer.

"Well, what's the difference?" asked his wife.

The farmer said, "Well, it's like this – If I were to say to you "Martha, the cows are in the corn"' – well, that would be a hymn. If on the other hand, I were to say to you:[/color]
<blockquote>[color=#000000" size="4" face="times]Martha, Martha, Martha,
Oh Martha, MARTHA, MARTHA,
the cows, the big cows, the brown cows, the black cows
the white cows, the black and white cows,
the COWS, COWS, COWS
are in the corn,
are in the corn, are in the corn, are in the corn,
the CORN, CORN, CORN.[/color]
[color=#000000" size="4" face="times]Then, if I were to repeat the whole thing two or three times, well, that would be a praise chorus."

The next weekend, his nephew, a young, new Christian from the city came to visit and attended the local church of the small town. He went home and his wife asked him how it was. "Well," said the young man, "it was good. They did something different however. They sang hymns instead of regular songs."

"Hymns?" asked his wife. "What are those?"

"Oh, they're OK. They are sort of like regular songs, only different," said the young man.

"Well, what's the difference?"

The young man said, "Well, it's like this – If I were to say to you 'Martha, the cows are in the corn' – well, that would be a regular song. If on the other hand, I were to say to you:[/color]
[color=#000000" size="4" face="times]'Oh Martha, dear Martha, hear thou my cry
Inclinest thine ear to the words of my mouth
Turn thou thy whole wondrous ear by and by
To the righteous, inimitable, glorious truth.

'For the way of the animals who can explain
There in their heads is no shadow of sense
Hearkenest they in God's sun or His rain
Unless from the mild, tempting corn they are fenced.

'Yea those cows in glad bovine, rebellious delight
Have broke free their shackles, their warm pens eschewed
Then goaded by minions of darkness and night
They all my mild Chilliwack sweet corn have chewed.

'So look to the bright shining day by and by
Where all foul corruptions of earth are reborn
Where no vicious animals make my soul cry
And I no longer see those foul cows in the corn.'[/color]
[color=#000000" size="4" face="times]Then if I were to do only verses one, three and four and do a key change on the last verse, well that would be a hymn.[/color]</blockquote>
[color=#0000FF" size="4" face="times]---------------------
ENJOY!!!
[/color]
Good theology!

My girls kept nagging me to get hearing aids so I didn't have to laugh at the dinner table jokes I couldn't hear.

So, as part of the Purpose Driven Cult infiltrate and divert they bought Howard's (aka Vineyard) new style praise book.

I spent 3500 for two such ear plugs so that when they started teaching heresy and spreading decibel poisoning I found out that I could plug my hearing aids in and then turn them off. Best investment I ever made. However, I finally had to retreat to the couch in the foyer along with several others.

That's why the meaning of wrath is orgy so that God turns them into buffoons to be laughed at.
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DCA
DCA

January 15th, 2015, 10:53 pm #4

Source: Humor, Hope, and Happily Ever Afters (Kaye Dacus)
[color=#000000" size="5" face="times]The Difference Between Praise Songs and Hymns<b></b>[/color]
[color=#000000" size="4" face="times]Sunday, September 14, 2008

I'm a traditionalist when it comes to worship. I prefer hymns, sung from an actual hymnal, to "praise choruses" that (a) no one knows and (b) don't mean anything anyway. Here's a story that was shared with me that illustrates my point:

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

An old farmer went to the city one weekend and attended the big city church. He came home and his wife asked him how it was. "Well," said the farmer, "it was good. They did something different, however. They sang praise choruses instead of hymns."

"Praise choruses?" said his wife. "What are those?"

"Oh, they're OK. They are sort of like hymns, only different," said the farmer.

"Well, what's the difference?" asked his wife.

The farmer said, "Well, it's like this – If I were to say to you "Martha, the cows are in the corn"' – well, that would be a hymn. If on the other hand, I were to say to you:[/color]
<blockquote>[color=#000000" size="4" face="times]Martha, Martha, Martha,
Oh Martha, MARTHA, MARTHA,
the cows, the big cows, the brown cows, the black cows
the white cows, the black and white cows,
the COWS, COWS, COWS
are in the corn,
are in the corn, are in the corn, are in the corn,
the CORN, CORN, CORN.[/color]
[color=#000000" size="4" face="times]Then, if I were to repeat the whole thing two or three times, well, that would be a praise chorus."

The next weekend, his nephew, a young, new Christian from the city came to visit and attended the local church of the small town. He went home and his wife asked him how it was. "Well," said the young man, "it was good. They did something different however. They sang hymns instead of regular songs."

"Hymns?" asked his wife. "What are those?"

"Oh, they're OK. They are sort of like regular songs, only different," said the young man.

"Well, what's the difference?"

The young man said, "Well, it's like this – If I were to say to you 'Martha, the cows are in the corn' – well, that would be a regular song. If on the other hand, I were to say to you:[/color]
[color=#000000" size="4" face="times]'Oh Martha, dear Martha, hear thou my cry
Inclinest thine ear to the words of my mouth
Turn thou thy whole wondrous ear by and by
To the righteous, inimitable, glorious truth.

'For the way of the animals who can explain
There in their heads is no shadow of sense
Hearkenest they in God's sun or His rain
Unless from the mild, tempting corn they are fenced.

'Yea those cows in glad bovine, rebellious delight
Have broke free their shackles, their warm pens eschewed
Then goaded by minions of darkness and night
They all my mild Chilliwack sweet corn have chewed.

'So look to the bright shining day by and by
Where all foul corruptions of earth are reborn
Where no vicious animals make my soul cry
And I no longer see those foul cows in the corn.'[/color]
[color=#000000" size="4" face="times]Then if I were to do only verses one, three and four and do a key change on the last verse, well that would be a hymn.[/color]</blockquote>
[color=#0000FF" size="4" face="times]---------------------
ENJOY!!!
[/color]
'Alas and did my saviour bleed and did my sov'reign die
Would he devote that sacred head for such a worm as I

At the cross at the cross where I first saw the light
And the burden of my heart rolled away
It was there by faith I received my sight
And now I am happy all the day'

Donnie Cruz calls his boss tomorrow morning and tells his boss
"Alas Boss, I am unable to make it today because I have the flu. I will be also unable to work overtime any additional Sundays, because I will be worshiping my Sov'reign leader. I do so because that is the least I can do since he devoted his sacred head for me.

Donnie Cruz's boss answers "do whaaaaaaaaaaatttttt?"

It all comes out in the wash, don't it?

Looking forward to an in-depth analysis of why one is better than the other.

Should be interesting.

Let me see......should we start with the fact that Donnie doesn't work on Sundays anyhow? Well if Martha, Martha, Martha can do it, then certainly Donnie fictitiously can also.
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Joined: July 29th, 2010, 2:32 pm

January 16th, 2015, 12:09 am #5

Churches gonna do what churches gonna do because they are not synagogues where the command is to SPEAK which is the opposite of ODE.

'Alas and did my saviour bleed and did my sov'reign die
Would he devote that sacred head for such a worm as I

At the cross at the cross where I first saw the light
And the burden of my heart rolled away
It was there by faith I received my sight
And now I am happy all the day'

I thought that the gospel OF the Kingdom was the power unto salvation?

Well-uh! I am a soul and not a WORM: don't believe what the stepford wimmin at church post.

Second, the cross was a STAKE or phallic symbol. I don't worship electric chairs.

Thirdly, you don't get your SIGHT or A holy spirit by FAITH.

God does not live houses nor is He worshiped by the WORKS of human hands: we disciples would attend Schools of Christ iffen we could find one.

Last edited by Ken.Sublett on January 16th, 2015, 12:12 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 2nd, 2005, 6:45 am

January 16th, 2015, 7:05 am #6

'Alas and did my saviour bleed and did my sov'reign die
Would he devote that sacred head for such a worm as I

At the cross at the cross where I first saw the light
And the burden of my heart rolled away
It was there by faith I received my sight
And now I am happy all the day'

Donnie Cruz calls his boss tomorrow morning and tells his boss
"Alas Boss, I am unable to make it today because I have the flu. I will be also unable to work overtime any additional Sundays, because I will be worshiping my Sov'reign leader. I do so because that is the least I can do since he devoted his sacred head for me.

Donnie Cruz's boss answers "do whaaaaaaaaaaatttttt?"

It all comes out in the wash, don't it?

Looking forward to an in-depth analysis of why one is better than the other.

Should be interesting.

Let me see......should we start with the fact that Donnie doesn't work on Sundays anyhow? Well if Martha, Martha, Martha can do it, then certainly Donnie fictitiously can also.
[color=#0000FF" size="4" face="times]We find "I am a worm" in Psalm 22:

[1] My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me? why art thou so far from helping me, and from the words of my roaring?
[2] O my God, I cry in the daytime, but thou hearest not; and in the night season, and am not silent.
[3] But thou art holy, O thou that inhabitest the praises of Israel.
[4] Our fathers trusted in thee: they trusted, and thou didst deliver them.
[5] They cried unto thee, and were delivered: they trusted in thee, and were not confounded.
[6] But I am a worm, and no man; a reproach of men, and despised of the people.


We see a parallel in Matt. 27:46, in Mark 15:34 -- "... that is to say, My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?"

What do Trinity Creed followers have to say about Jesus (as God) saying, "My God, my God"? Oops, we're not really discussing the Trinity doctrine.

OK, then, Dave, we need someone to research the history of "Alas! and Did My Savior Bleed" -- what "for such a worm as I" really meant to the "hymn" writer.

Some hymnals have it substituted as: "for sinners such as I."

Now that reminds me of "Holy, Holy, Holy!"

The original words were: "God in three Persons, blessed Trinity!"

But in the older hymnals used in churches of Christ, the words were/are: "God overall, and blest eternally" -- in objection to the Trinity Creed.[/color]
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Joined: January 2nd, 2005, 6:45 am

January 16th, 2015, 7:31 am #7

Donnie, I agree with you, the old hymns are my preference also. I can handle an occasional praise song but I will not stand for 20 minutes anymore while the praise songs are performed. Bass guitar, drums, and strobe lights make for a quick exit. We still have a choice of service types but I'm not sure how long that will last. JMHO.
[color=#0000FF" size="4" face="times]Justly, I would like to give credit to the source: Kaye Dacus. I just had to publish the article.

There's too much emphasis on "self" in many "praise" songs -- I ... me ... mine ... my ... myself. And certain expressions: "Darling Jesus, Darling Jesus, Oh my darling Jesus," etc.[/color]



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Joined: July 29th, 2010, 2:32 pm

January 16th, 2015, 5:40 pm #8

[color=#0000FF" size="4" face="times]We find "I am a worm" in Psalm 22:

[1] My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me? why art thou so far from helping me, and from the words of my roaring?
[2] O my God, I cry in the daytime, but thou hearest not; and in the night season, and am not silent.
[3] But thou art holy, O thou that inhabitest the praises of Israel.
[4] Our fathers trusted in thee: they trusted, and thou didst deliver them.
[5] They cried unto thee, and were delivered: they trusted in thee, and were not confounded.
[6] But I am a worm, and no man; a reproach of men, and despised of the people.


We see a parallel in Matt. 27:46, in Mark 15:34 -- "... that is to say, My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?"

What do Trinity Creed followers have to say about Jesus (as God) saying, "My God, my God"? Oops, we're not really discussing the Trinity doctrine.

OK, then, Dave, we need someone to research the history of "Alas! and Did My Savior Bleed" -- what "for such a worm as I" really meant to the "hymn" writer.

Some hymnals have it substituted as: "for sinners such as I."

Now that reminds me of "Holy, Holy, Holy!"

The original words were: "God in three Persons, blessed Trinity!"

But in the older hymnals used in churches of Christ, the words were/are: "God overall, and blest eternally" -- in objection to the Trinity Creed.[/color]
"This God is never called a person. The word person was never applied to God in the Middle ages. The reason for this is that the three members of the trinity were called personae (faces or countenances): The Father is persona, the Son is persona, and the Spirit is persona. Persona here means a special characteristic of the divine ground, expressing itself in an independent hypostasis. Thus, we can say that it was the nineteenth century which made God into a person, with the result that the greatness of the classical idea of God was destroyed by this way of speaking... but to speak of God as a person would have been heretical for the Middle Ages; it would have been to them a Unitarian heresy, because it would have conflicted with the statement that God has three personae, three expressions of his being. (Tillich, Paul, History of Christian Thought, p. 190)

In all of the original documents which agrees with the statement of Jesus:

The Father thinks or conceives
The Father breathes (spirit: not a people other than Apollyon)
The Son articulates the Words of God: double-edged swords are the lips.

Most if not all of the end-time tribulation comes from people who claim that they have "a" spirit person in them: they have a new PARADIGM which they do not grasp means PATTERN to be followed.

http://www.piney.com/FathArnoHeresIV.html

Arnobius Book IV.12. But let them be true, as you maintain, yet will you have us also believe that Mellonia, for example, introduces herself into the entrails, or Limentinus, and that they set themselves to make known what you seek to learn? Did you ever see their face their deportment, their countenance? or can even these be seen in lungs or livers?

May it not happen, may it not come to pass, although you craftily conceal it, that the one should take the other's place, deluding, mocking, deceiving, and presenting the appearance of the deity invoked?

If the magi, who are so much akin to soothsayers, relate that, in their incantations, pretended gods steal in frequently instead of those invoked; that some of these, moreover, are spirits of grosser substance, who pretend that they are gods, and delude the ignorant by their lies and deceit,- why should we not similarly believe that here, too, others substitute themselves for those who are not, that they may both strengthen your superstitious beliefs, and rejoice that victims are slain in sacrifice to them under names not their own?


God sends LYING SPIRITS!


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DCA
DCA

January 19th, 2015, 6:16 pm #9

You can substitute the worm with anything you deem suitable, and Ken can tear the song down too, but the point made was sufficient. You degrade the new songs as sangy, clangy and happy, clappy, but you don't want anyone tearing down your sacred hymns of old. Ken, if you can be a worm then you certainly can be a wretch (Amazing Grace)




I still hold out hope for you gents.
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Joined: January 2nd, 2005, 6:45 am

January 19th, 2015, 7:04 pm #10

[color=#0000FF" size="4" face="times]Dave,

All I was pointing out was that "such a worm as I" is in the Scriptures. "But I am a worm, and no man; a reproach of men, and despised of the people" (Ps. 22:6).

That's a better admission and confession than a reminder or an FYI to God with "I love you, my darling Jesus." As if singing "praise songs" is one's way to heaven.

Oh, I think there are some Scripture-based contemporary "Christian" songs that will be included in the "hymn books" in time by qualified editors and publishers.[/color]
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