Joined: July 29th, 2010, 2:32 pm

October 28th, 2014, 9:05 pm #11

Bill, I kinda understand where you are coming from. I find it very offensive when someone makes fun of God's GRACE.
When people belittle the Word of God "as it has been taught or written" God causes wrath or ORGY to break out: Paul proves that was men without holy hands and women who caused the audience and all of the angels in heave to laugh in sore derision:

Sophocles, Oedipus Tyrannus
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/tex ... 〈=original

Soph. OT 873 Chorus
Insolence breeds the tyrant. Insolence, once vainly stuffed with wealth [875] that is not proper or good for it, when it has scaled the topmost ramparts, is hurled to a dire doom, where one's feet cannot serve to good advantage. But I pray that the god never [880] quell such rivalry as benefits the state. I will always hold the god as our protector.
Soph. OT 884 But if any man walks haughtily in deed or word, [885] with no fear of Justice, no reverence for the images of gods, may an evil doom seize him for his ill-starred pride, if he does not gain his advantage fairly, [890] or avoid unholy deeds, but seeks to lay profaning hands on sanctities. Where such things occur, what mortal shall boast any more that he can ward off the arrow of the gods from his life? [895] No. For if such deeds are held in honor, why should we join in the sacred dance

Last edited by Ken.Sublett on October 28th, 2014, 11:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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October 28th, 2014, 9:53 pm #12

Bill, I kinda understand where you are coming from. I find it very offensive when someone makes fun of God's GRACE.
Does God's grace say that we need not have two parts of the Lord's Supper, that is bread and cup?

Would God's grace prove that patterning after the NT church is incorrect?

Does emphasis on grace diminish the need for holiness?
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Justice
Justice

October 29th, 2014, 9:15 am #13


Scripture, first things first. What's in your pocket?
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October 29th, 2014, 12:14 pm #14

There is a vast difference between laughter of joy and laughter of mockery. The New Testament describes heaven as a place where there will be no more woes and troubles of the world (Rev. 21:4). Thus, heaven is total joy. On the other hand, "Christian comedians" use humor to trivialize and mock Christianity to evoke laughter. Christians should find no delight in humor that mocks their faith.
Psalm 100 King James Version (KJV)

100 Make a joyful noise unto the Lord, all ye lands.

2 Serve the Lord with gladness: come before his presence with singing.

3 Know ye that the Lord he is God: it is he that hath made us, and not we ourselves; we are his people, and the sheep of his pasture.

4 Enter into his gates with thanksgiving, and into his courts with praise: be thankful unto him, and bless his name.

5 For the Lord is good; his mercy is everlasting; and his truth endureth to all generations.
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October 29th, 2014, 12:47 pm #15

There is a vast difference between laughter of joy and laughter of mockery. The New Testament describes heaven as a place where there will be no more woes and troubles of the world (Rev. 21:4). Thus, heaven is total joy. On the other hand, "Christian comedians" use humor to trivialize and mock Christianity to evoke laughter. Christians should find no delight in humor that mocks their faith.
Interesting article.

***********************

The Emotions of Jesus

by Wayne Jackson

In addition to possessing a divine nature, Jesus Christ was also flesh and blood (John 1:14), a human being. He thus shared with us the full range of human emotions. He could be happy or sad. What circumstances of life made our Lord weep? What made him joyful? A study of this theme is both thrilling and rewarding.

The Tears of Jesus

The book of Isaiah prophetically speaks of the Lord Jesus as “a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief” (53:3). Three times in the New Testament there is the record of Jesus weeping. Let us consider each of these.

Jesus wept for friends

John 11:35 poignantly states: “Jesus wept.” The Greek term for “wept” is dakruo, used only in this New Testament passage. It literally means “to shed tears.” It suggests a silent, tender weeping. The occasion of this touching scene is in connection with the death of Lazarus.

What precipitated the Master’s tears at this time? It was surely not the grief of hopelessness (cf. 1 Thessalonians 4:13) for Lazarus was in a better state of being. Nor was it a weeping of loneliness, for the Lord knew that his friend would be back with his family and associates presently.

Some have suggested that Jesus wept because he recognized he would be bringing Lazarus back to a life of hardship (cf. John 12:10). More likely, however, is the view which suggests that Christ wept out of pure sympathy for those whose hearts were breaking at this time. John writes:


“When Jesus therefore saw her weeping, and the Jews also weeping who came with her, he groaned in the spirit, and was troubled, and said, Where have you laid him?” (11:33-34).

How comforting it is to know that our great High Priest really shares our feelings (cf. Hebrews 2:17). If we would be Christ-like, we must learn to truly empathize with others (cf. Romans 12:13).

Jesus wept over his enemies

When the Son of God contemplated the impending fate of his beloved Jerusalem, which was about to crucify him, he audibly wept (for so the Greek word klaio indicates) in genuine anguish (see Luke 19:41).

Without question, the Lord here evidenced great sorrow as he anticipated the horrors which would descend upon the rebellious Jews who were on the verge of murdering their own Messiah.

More tragic even than their physical suffering was the ultimate reception of the wrath of God as a consequence of their disobedience (Matthew 23:34-36; 1 Thessalonians 2:16). Truly, we too must grieve for the lost.

Jesus wept for himself

Though the Gospel accounts do not specifically mention it, another inspired writer indicates that Christ wept bitterly in those dark hours before the crucifixion (Hebrews 5:7). Perhaps his tears were for a lost humanity so oblivious to the tragedy about to be performed.

Likely, however, his weeping also reflected the dread of his holy soul as he contemplated bearing the consequence of sin upon the cursed tree (Galatians 3:13; Hebrews 12:2).

Maybe there was a connection between his tears and that agonizing cry from the cross, “My God, my God, why hast thou forsaken me?” (For a discussion of this passage see the printed Christian Courier, July 1988).

Did Jesus Ever Laugh?

Though the Scriptures nowhere speak of Jesus laughing, one should not adopt an unbalanced view of the Son of God by assuming that he was never happy.
There are several occasions in the Lord’s preaching ministry wherein a touch of humor was tucked away into his illustrations.

The allusion to attempting to remove a splinter from another’s eye, while a beam protrudes from one’s own eye (Matthew 7:4), and the reference to straining out a gnat, yet swallowing a camel (Matthew 23:24), are packed with humor.

In point of fact, though, the New Testament indicates that Christ “rejoiced” on several occasions. Let us consider this side of the Lord’s emotions for a moment.

Jesus rejoiced in saving people

In the parable of the lost sheep, when the concerned shepherd found his wayward lamb which had wandered from the flock, he carried it home on his shoulders, rejoicing. Moreover, he called together his friends and said, “Rejoice with me, for I have found my sheep which was lost” (Luke 15:5-6).

It is scarcely necessary to emphasize that Jesus is the good Shepherd (John 10:11, 14), and that this narrative, therefore, reflects the Savior’s emotions when the lost return to the fold.

There is no greater sense of elation than seeing a doomed soul reclaimed from the eternal curse of sin.

Jesus rejoiced in victory over Satan

When the seventy disciples returned from a preaching mission and reported their success over Satanic forces, the Lord rejoiced (Luke 10:21).

Jesus rejoiced in fortifying the faith of his friends

Christ was glad (rejoiced) that his followers had the opportunity of seeing Lazarus raised from the dead that their faith might be increased (John 11:15).

It is interesting to note that the two references to Jesus’ emotions in John 11, have him both glad and sad on the same occasion—just twenty verses apart (vv. 15,35). Mourning can be transformed into happiness!

Jesus rejoiced in the anticipation of the resurrection

Jesus is represented as prophetically rejoicing in anticipation of his glorious resurrection from the dead (Psalm 16:9; cf. Acts 2:26). Again, we are reminded of Hebrews 12:2. Christ, “for the joy that was set before him endured the cross.”

In conclusion, it is interesting to note that the things which brought forth sadness or joy to the heart of our blessed Lord were not the mundane matters of this world, to which our emotions are generally tied. Rather, he operated upon a plateau that far transcends that which is characteristic of those who know only this earthly environment.

Perhaps our emotional emphases could stand some refinement.
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October 30th, 2014, 3:56 pm #16

Scripture, first things first. What's in your pocket?
Grace occurs in a variety of ways and is conditioned by man's response to it. Every covenant has obligations for each party. God is the party who imparts the forgiveness, man is the one who shows love to God and man and mercy to man. Those who pervert grace tend to say that God is the only responsible agent in the covenant, and that man is purely the recipient. Usually in fast-growth churches very little is said about man's obligations in the covenant with God. Theology become paper-thin.

Paul warns that a perversion of the grace doctrine can lead to antinomianism, the absence of law-consciousness. Romans 6.

The tunnel vision that attracts users to specific sentences in Ephesians 2 leads to the ignoring the statement in that very passage that we are God's "workmanship", created for good works.

I heard an elder psychologist argue with a sexologist preacher that there are no "rules" for the Christian. The sexologist preacher replied, "Thou shall not commit adultery."

The Churches of Christ of today are lacking a comprehensive explanation of the interplay between grace and works. Yet the Bible is full of teaching on these points. This sad state of affairs is fed by the ignorance of general Bible teaching, and verse by verse study.

We are also being affected greatly by the evangelical pressures around us.

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Cosby Christian
Cosby Christian

October 30th, 2014, 5:02 pm #17

"Three preachers walk into a bar"...nevermind! Entering a no laugh zone! Scripture don't you have bigger "fish" to fry like a church that has no staff left and a weak eldership that has no clue how to fix the mess they have on their hands. That's no laughable matter ! Big picture, Scripture BIG picture.
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Joined: July 29th, 2010, 2:32 pm

October 30th, 2014, 6:35 pm #18

Grace occurs in a variety of ways and is conditioned by man's response to it. Every covenant has obligations for each party. God is the party who imparts the forgiveness, man is the one who shows love to God and man and mercy to man. Those who pervert grace tend to say that God is the only responsible agent in the covenant, and that man is purely the recipient. Usually in fast-growth churches very little is said about man's obligations in the covenant with God. Theology become paper-thin.

Paul warns that a perversion of the grace doctrine can lead to antinomianism, the absence of law-consciousness. Romans 6.

The tunnel vision that attracts users to specific sentences in Ephesians 2 leads to the ignoring the statement in that very passage that we are God's "workmanship", created for good works.

I heard an elder psychologist argue with a sexologist preacher that there are no "rules" for the Christian. The sexologist preacher replied, "Thou shall not commit adultery."

The Churches of Christ of today are lacking a comprehensive explanation of the interplay between grace and works. Yet the Bible is full of teaching on these points. This sad state of affairs is fed by the ignorance of general Bible teaching, and verse by verse study.

We are also being affected greatly by the evangelical pressures around us.
Titus 2:11 For the grace of God that bringeth salvation hath appeared to all men,
Titus 2:12 Teaching us that, denying ungodliness and worldly lusts, we should live soberly, righteously, and godly, in this present world;
Titus 2:13 Looking for that blessed hope, and the glorious appearing of the great God and our Saviour Jesus Christ;
Titus 2:14 Who gave himself for us, that he might redeem us from all iniquity, and purify unto himself a peculiar people, zealous of good works.

Titus 3:3 For we ourselves also were sometimes foolish, disobedient, deceived, serving divers lusts and pleasures, living in malice and envy, hateful, and hating one another.
Titus 3:4 But after that the kindness and love of God our Saviour toward man appeared,
Titus 3:5 Not by works of righteousness which we have done, but according to his mercy he saved us, by the washing of regeneration, and renewing of the Holy Ghost;
Titus 3:6 Which he shed on us abundantly through Jesus Christ our Saviour;


Don't let those blue-eyed Blond Graces shed anything on you.
Last edited by Ken.Sublett on October 30th, 2014, 6:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: July 29th, 2010, 2:32 pm

October 30th, 2014, 6:47 pm #19

The house cricket loses its will--and its-life-to the horsehair worm. Larvae of the parasiite infiltrate the cricket when it scavenges dead insects then grow inside it. The cricket is terrestrial but the adult stage of the worms' life cycle is aquatic. So when the mature worm is ready to emerge, it alters the brain of its hosts, driving the cricket to abandon the safety of land and take a suicidal leap into the nearest body of water. As the cricket drowns, an adult worm emerges, sometimes a foot in length.

Moral: don't eat dead worm guitar players, or cricket singers who may live on dead insects
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Justice
Justice

October 30th, 2014, 7:46 pm #20

Apparently one of the gimmicks some modern churches use today to keep Christians "interested" is the so-called "Christian comedian." S/he's the person who tells jokes and amusing anecdotes just like a regular stand-up comedian, only the butt of those jokes is Christianity. Now these jokes are designed to put a light spin on Christianity so that it will be more pleasing and palatable to the masses. If people can get a good laugh out of praise and worship, if they can see Christianity as anything but "serious," they can stomach going to church.

Here's a link to one such "Christian comedian." His subject is hand-raising in worship. Judge for yourself.

http://m.godvine.com/Awesome-Worship-Ad ... -3798.html
Perhaps for some it is time to get back to work.






_____________________________

[color=#0000FF" size="3" face="times]Not that there's no interest in seeing "the BIG picture," but that the image was larger than a 13-inch screen ... had to reduce its height and width.[/color]
Last edited by Donnie.Cruz on October 31st, 2014, 4:56 am, edited 1 time in total.
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