Spelling, Grammar, and Punctuation

Dr. Bill Crump
Dr. Bill Crump

November 18th, 2010, 6:34 pm #1

Donnie asked me to start a special thread devoted to observations about errors in spelling and grammar--and punctuation. I am happy to comply. Since it seems that posters tend to act negatively whenever they are corrected in any way--whether it's about poor English or faulty theology--this thread at least allows us to post observations of people's English errors without mentioning specific names as such to save them from embarrassment. However, we should at least mention the thread or location wherein the error(s) is/are found and the sentence(s) or phrase(s) involved, along with the appropriate correction(s), so that the poster(s) who made the errors can study them.

Corrections to all errors should always be accompanied by a reference, either printed or online.

This is not a "class" in creative writing.

Let's not get carried away with condemning popular, recognized colloquialisms such as "kinda" and "gotta" and similar words. In fact, "kinda" (meaning "kind of") is a recognized adverb, and "gotta" (meaning "got to" or "have got to") is a recognized verb. Reference: dictionary.com.

I ask that off-topic messages--such as those with an aim to be sarcastic, to insult, and to smear others--not be posted here. Thanks.

====================

[color=#0000FF" size="3" face="times]CM: Original post unedited.[/color]
Last edited by Donnie.Cruz on November 1st, 2014, 5:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Dr. Bill Crump
Dr. Bill Crump

November 18th, 2010, 8:21 pm #2

In the "You Guys Are Too Much" thread, a request was made as follows:

"If I were you I would....

[Or] is it

If I was you I would...

still unclear to me. Thanks."

Answer: "If I WERE you..."

Reference:

http://www.agriculture.purdue.edu/agcom ... .Iwere.htm
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Donnie
Donnie

November 18th, 2010, 9:46 pm #3

Donnie asked me to start a special thread devoted to observations about errors in spelling and grammar--and punctuation. I am happy to comply. Since it seems that posters tend to act negatively whenever they are corrected in any way--whether it's about poor English or faulty theology--this thread at least allows us to post observations of people's English errors without mentioning specific names as such to save them from embarrassment. However, we should at least mention the thread or location wherein the error(s) is/are found and the sentence(s) or phrase(s) involved, along with the appropriate correction(s), so that the poster(s) who made the errors can study them.

Corrections to all errors should always be accompanied by a reference, either printed or online.

This is not a "class" in creative writing.

Let's not get carried away with condemning popular, recognized colloquialisms such as "kinda" and "gotta" and similar words. In fact, "kinda" (meaning "kind of") is a recognized adverb, and "gotta" (meaning "got to" or "have got to") is a recognized verb. Reference: dictionary.com.

I ask that off-topic messages--such as those with an aim to be sarcastic, to insult, and to smear others--not be posted here. Thanks.

====================

[color=#0000FF" size="3" face="times]CM: Original post unedited.[/color]
Dr. Crump,

Would you be able to provide valuable information related to specific topics before we commit these mistakes? I'm thinking about one post dealing with one specific topic, and the topic being the subject or title of the post. I believe there are numerous topics to consider, e.g.:

  • Possessive Pronouns (yours, theirs, ours, its, etc. are often misspelled)
    </li>
  • Contraction (it's, they're, you're, who's)
    </li>
  • etc.</li>
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Dr. Bill Crump
Dr. Bill Crump

November 18th, 2010, 10:42 pm #4

Donnie asked me to start a special thread devoted to observations about errors in spelling and grammar--and punctuation. I am happy to comply. Since it seems that posters tend to act negatively whenever they are corrected in any way--whether it's about poor English or faulty theology--this thread at least allows us to post observations of people's English errors without mentioning specific names as such to save them from embarrassment. However, we should at least mention the thread or location wherein the error(s) is/are found and the sentence(s) or phrase(s) involved, along with the appropriate correction(s), so that the poster(s) who made the errors can study them.

Corrections to all errors should always be accompanied by a reference, either printed or online.

This is not a "class" in creative writing.

Let's not get carried away with condemning popular, recognized colloquialisms such as "kinda" and "gotta" and similar words. In fact, "kinda" (meaning "kind of") is a recognized adverb, and "gotta" (meaning "got to" or "have got to") is a recognized verb. Reference: dictionary.com.

I ask that off-topic messages--such as those with an aim to be sarcastic, to insult, and to smear others--not be posted here. Thanks.

====================

[color=#0000FF" size="3" face="times]CM: Original post unedited.[/color]
I've noticed that some titles of messages are not capitalized, as in "typographical errors" in the thread "You Guys Are Too Much." While it has become the "norm" in informal writing to omit capitals (newspapers often capitalize only the first word and proper nouns in headlines), here are some tips about using capitals in titles:

Link: http://www.writersblock.ca/tips/monthtip/tipmar98.htm
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Dr. Bill Crump
Dr. Bill Crump

November 18th, 2010, 11:07 pm #5

Dr. Crump,

Would you be able to provide valuable information related to specific topics before we commit these mistakes? I'm thinking about one post dealing with one specific topic, and the topic being the subject or title of the post. I believe there are numerous topics to consider, e.g.:

  • Possessive Pronouns (yours, theirs, ours, its, etc. are often misspelled)
    </li>
  • Contraction (it's, they're, you're, who's)
    </li>
  • etc.</li>
Contractions are formed by using the apostrophe. Tips for forming contractions may be found at:

http://editfast.com/english/grammar/apo ... ission.htm and at:

http://www.wikihow.com/Use-Apostrophes

For possessive pronouns, see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Possessive_pronoun (also covers its, it's, whose, and who's).
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Dr. Bill Crump
Dr. Bill Crump

December 13th, 2010, 6:42 pm #6

Donnie asked me to start a special thread devoted to observations about errors in spelling and grammar--and punctuation. I am happy to comply. Since it seems that posters tend to act negatively whenever they are corrected in any way--whether it's about poor English or faulty theology--this thread at least allows us to post observations of people's English errors without mentioning specific names as such to save them from embarrassment. However, we should at least mention the thread or location wherein the error(s) is/are found and the sentence(s) or phrase(s) involved, along with the appropriate correction(s), so that the poster(s) who made the errors can study them.

Corrections to all errors should always be accompanied by a reference, either printed or online.

This is not a "class" in creative writing.

Let's not get carried away with condemning popular, recognized colloquialisms such as "kinda" and "gotta" and similar words. In fact, "kinda" (meaning "kind of") is a recognized adverb, and "gotta" (meaning "got to" or "have got to") is a recognized verb. Reference: dictionary.com.

I ask that off-topic messages--such as those with an aim to be sarcastic, to insult, and to smear others--not be posted here. Thanks.

====================

[color=#0000FF" size="3" face="times]CM: Original post unedited.[/color]
Thread: Ephesians 4:14

Message: "I Wonder Why"

Error: Dave wrote: "He used his ability to play to send that heart felt [sic] message to God."

The word is "heartfelt," not "heart felt." "Heartfelt" is one word, not two.

Reference:http://dictionary.reference.com/
____________________________

Thread: Ephesians 4:14

Message: "Heart Felt"

Errors: "Heartfelt" is one word, not two (see ref. above). Also, Dave wrote: "I knot [sic] that makes you legalists livid."

The sentence should read, "I know that makes you legalists livid."

It does seem that Dave is the one who is working himself into a tantrum.

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Dr. Bill Crump
Dr. Bill Crump

December 20th, 2010, 2:15 am #7

Donnie asked me to start a special thread devoted to observations about errors in spelling and grammar--and punctuation. I am happy to comply. Since it seems that posters tend to act negatively whenever they are corrected in any way--whether it's about poor English or faulty theology--this thread at least allows us to post observations of people's English errors without mentioning specific names as such to save them from embarrassment. However, we should at least mention the thread or location wherein the error(s) is/are found and the sentence(s) or phrase(s) involved, along with the appropriate correction(s), so that the poster(s) who made the errors can study them.

Corrections to all errors should always be accompanied by a reference, either printed or online.

This is not a "class" in creative writing.

Let's not get carried away with condemning popular, recognized colloquialisms such as "kinda" and "gotta" and similar words. In fact, "kinda" (meaning "kind of") is a recognized adverb, and "gotta" (meaning "got to" or "have got to") is a recognized verb. Reference: dictionary.com.

I ask that off-topic messages--such as those with an aim to be sarcastic, to insult, and to smear others--not be posted here. Thanks.

====================

[color=#0000FF" size="3" face="times]CM: Original post unedited.[/color]
Thread: The Change Agents Are Coming!!!!

Message: "4 Part Harmony"

Error: Dave wrote: "Does God here [sic] the different tenor, bass, soprano, or alto notes?"

The correct wording should be, "Does God hear the different tenor, bass, soprano, or alto notes?"

Apparently Dave needs a lesson in homophones (no, they are not telephones for gays).

Dave should go to http://dictionary.reference.com/ and look up "here" and "hear." He should study the differences between the two words, because they do have different meanings.
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Joined: January 2nd, 2005, 6:45 am

December 20th, 2010, 2:25 am #8

Dr. Bill, I think some folks have taken courses in "speed reading" or "speed typing" or "accounting made simple" or "computers for dummies." I really think Dave knows about "homophones" [good that you explained this one ]. If Dave would just take time to review his typed messages....
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Dr. Bill Crump
Dr. Bill Crump

December 27th, 2010, 10:46 pm #9

Donnie asked me to start a special thread devoted to observations about errors in spelling and grammar--and punctuation. I am happy to comply. Since it seems that posters tend to act negatively whenever they are corrected in any way--whether it's about poor English or faulty theology--this thread at least allows us to post observations of people's English errors without mentioning specific names as such to save them from embarrassment. However, we should at least mention the thread or location wherein the error(s) is/are found and the sentence(s) or phrase(s) involved, along with the appropriate correction(s), so that the poster(s) who made the errors can study them.

Corrections to all errors should always be accompanied by a reference, either printed or online.

This is not a "class" in creative writing.

Let's not get carried away with condemning popular, recognized colloquialisms such as "kinda" and "gotta" and similar words. In fact, "kinda" (meaning "kind of") is a recognized adverb, and "gotta" (meaning "got to" or "have got to") is a recognized verb. Reference: dictionary.com.

I ask that off-topic messages--such as those with an aim to be sarcastic, to insult, and to smear others--not be posted here. Thanks.

====================

[color=#0000FF" size="3" face="times]CM: Original post unedited.[/color]
Thread: "God Work"

Message: "Re: God Work" (Dec. 27 by Fred)

Error: Fred wrote: "This reminds me of the movie 'A Few Good Men'". Titles of things that can stand alone, such as motion pictures, are placed in italics, not quotation marks. Thus, Fred's statement should be, "This reminds me of the movie A Few Good Men."

Reference: http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar/italics.htm
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Dr. Bill Crump
Dr. Bill Crump

December 30th, 2010, 6:24 pm #10

Donnie asked me to start a special thread devoted to observations about errors in spelling and grammar--and punctuation. I am happy to comply. Since it seems that posters tend to act negatively whenever they are corrected in any way--whether it's about poor English or faulty theology--this thread at least allows us to post observations of people's English errors without mentioning specific names as such to save them from embarrassment. However, we should at least mention the thread or location wherein the error(s) is/are found and the sentence(s) or phrase(s) involved, along with the appropriate correction(s), so that the poster(s) who made the errors can study them.

Corrections to all errors should always be accompanied by a reference, either printed or online.

This is not a "class" in creative writing.

Let's not get carried away with condemning popular, recognized colloquialisms such as "kinda" and "gotta" and similar words. In fact, "kinda" (meaning "kind of") is a recognized adverb, and "gotta" (meaning "got to" or "have got to") is a recognized verb. Reference: dictionary.com.

I ask that off-topic messages--such as those with an aim to be sarcastic, to insult, and to smear others--not be posted here. Thanks.

====================

[color=#0000FF" size="3" face="times]CM: Original post unedited.[/color]
Yes, we know that Dave thinks anyone who disagrees with him is "immature"; that Dave thinks anyone with whom he disagrees is "immature"; and that Dave brands as "immature" anyone who rightly calls him "immature." We know all that. Can we now return to the subject of this thread, which is spelling, grammar, and punctuation? How about dumping all the "immature" talk into the Special Den of Vipers?
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