Dr. Bill Crump
Dr. Bill Crump

January 8th, 2011, 3:27 am #31

Donnie asked me to start a special thread devoted to observations about errors in spelling and grammar--and punctuation. I am happy to comply. Since it seems that posters tend to act negatively whenever they are corrected in any way--whether it's about poor English or faulty theology--this thread at least allows us to post observations of people's English errors without mentioning specific names as such to save them from embarrassment. However, we should at least mention the thread or location wherein the error(s) is/are found and the sentence(s) or phrase(s) involved, along with the appropriate correction(s), so that the poster(s) who made the errors can study them.

Corrections to all errors should always be accompanied by a reference, either printed or online.

This is not a "class" in creative writing.

Let's not get carried away with condemning popular, recognized colloquialisms such as "kinda" and "gotta" and similar words. In fact, "kinda" (meaning "kind of") is a recognized adverb, and "gotta" (meaning "got to" or "have got to") is a recognized verb. Reference: dictionary.com.

I ask that off-topic messages--such as those with an aim to be sarcastic, to insult, and to smear others--not be posted here. Thanks.

====================

[color=#0000FF" size="3" face="times]CM: Original post unedited.[/color]
Thread: Questions...

Message: "You Don't Like Change???..."

Error: Dave wrote: "Key word there, gents??? EVERY knee, that would include yours too....not [sic] matter how arrogant you are."

That should be "...no matter how arrogant..." BTW, why did Dave place "EVERY" in all caps, if he objected to my placing "POW" in all caps? Does Dave follow a double standard, or is it possible that Dave heeded my lesson about all caps?

Actually, let's clean up Dave's statement a bit and get rid of those sentence fragments and multiple question marks. Try this: "The key word there, gents, is EVERY knee. That would include yours, too, no matter how arrogant you are."

Although Dave admits that he ignores what I teach, I trust that these little "lessons" will be of value to other readers.
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Dr. Bill Crump
Dr. Bill Crump

January 15th, 2011, 6:13 pm #32

Donnie asked me to start a special thread devoted to observations about errors in spelling and grammar--and punctuation. I am happy to comply. Since it seems that posters tend to act negatively whenever they are corrected in any way--whether it's about poor English or faulty theology--this thread at least allows us to post observations of people's English errors without mentioning specific names as such to save them from embarrassment. However, we should at least mention the thread or location wherein the error(s) is/are found and the sentence(s) or phrase(s) involved, along with the appropriate correction(s), so that the poster(s) who made the errors can study them.

Corrections to all errors should always be accompanied by a reference, either printed or online.

This is not a "class" in creative writing.

Let's not get carried away with condemning popular, recognized colloquialisms such as "kinda" and "gotta" and similar words. In fact, "kinda" (meaning "kind of") is a recognized adverb, and "gotta" (meaning "got to" or "have got to") is a recognized verb. Reference: dictionary.com.

I ask that off-topic messages--such as those with an aim to be sarcastic, to insult, and to smear others--not be posted here. Thanks.

====================

[color=#0000FF" size="3" face="times]CM: Original post unedited.[/color]
Thread: The Liberal Mind and Method

Message: "I Truly AM Laughing"

Error: Sonny wrote, "BTW, there is a grammar [sic] error in your response."

Although "grammar" is spelled correctly, that word is a noun. Sonny erroneously uses it as an adjective to modify "error." Nouns do not modify other nouns. Nouns are modified by adjectives. The correct adjective to use is "grammatical," as in, "BTW, there is a grammatical error in your response."
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Dave
Dave

January 16th, 2011, 4:21 am #33

Just because you might want it to be 'grammatical error,' 'grammar error' is fine, and correct also.

Like it or not William Crump, that is the way it is.
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Joined: January 2nd, 2005, 6:45 am

January 16th, 2011, 5:44 am #34

[color=#0000FF" size="3" face="times]I use "grammar error" occasionally; therefore, it is correct. [Just kidding. ]

"Human" is a noun, and so is "error." Why is it correct to say: "That was a human error"? Or, to say: "It is human nature"? Should we resort to saying: "The time to correct this humanistic error is now"? (Note, though, that "human" can be an adjective as in "human form" or "human error" or "human nature.")

"System" is a noun. Why is it correct to say: "That was a system error"? "Systematic" is an adjective. But "a systematic error" sheds a different meaning from "a system error."

I would give the edge to "grammatical error" because "grammar" is a learning system, and we would not want a learning system to be an error. What about saying: "That was an error in grammar"?

[/color]
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Dr. Bill Crump
Dr. Bill Crump

January 16th, 2011, 2:57 pm #35

Just because you might want it to be 'grammatical error,' 'grammar error' is fine, and correct also.

Like it or not William Crump, that is the way it is.
According to the dictionary, "human" can be used as a noun or as an adjective. Therefore, terms such as "human form" and "human nature" are correct. Although "system" is ordinarily a noun, the term "system error" is recognized as legitimate. "Grammar," however, is strictly a noun and should be modified by an adjective. If people insist on saying "grammar error," they might as well say that using "ain't" is correct as well. Such people would say, "Get used to saying 'ain't'." Although people say "grammar error" and "ain't" all the time, they are still not grammatically correct.

I have the dictionary as my source, whereas Dave has...well...nothing but his preference for incorrect grammar. If Dave wants to be obtuse and scream "grammar error" until he is blue in the face, what is that to us? We know that Dave allows his rabid bias to resist any form of teaching and instruction by conservatives. In the words of Walter Cronkite, "And that's the way it is."
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Dave
Dave

January 17th, 2011, 3:17 am #36

For a man that makes up his own words as his goes......I wouldn't say that you actually use your dictionary, would you?

Abridged or unabridged, well-worded AIN'T anywhere. You only found it under the root of 'word.' You did not and CANNOT find 'well-worded' standing alone....by itself.....anywhere.

Again, William Crump, some of us like rules. It gives us stability. God gives us rules to make us happy and content. Some people will always live outside of those rules and think that it is all a joke. The joke is on them.....and you.

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Sonny
Sonny

January 17th, 2011, 1:48 pm #37


[color=#0000FF" size="3" face="times]This post has been transferred to this thread:[/color]
Last edited by Donnie.Cruz on January 17th, 2011, 9:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Roncar
Roncar

January 17th, 2011, 8:42 pm #38

According to the dictionary, "human" can be used as a noun or as an adjective. Therefore, terms such as "human form" and "human nature" are correct. Although "system" is ordinarily a noun, the term "system error" is recognized as legitimate. "Grammar," however, is strictly a noun and should be modified by an adjective. If people insist on saying "grammar error," they might as well say that using "ain't" is correct as well. Such people would say, "Get used to saying 'ain't'." Although people say "grammar error" and "ain't" all the time, they are still not grammatically correct.

I have the dictionary as my source, whereas Dave has...well...nothing but his preference for incorrect grammar. If Dave wants to be obtuse and scream "grammar error" until he is blue in the face, what is that to us? We know that Dave allows his rabid bias to resist any form of teaching and instruction by conservatives. In the words of Walter Cronkite, "And that's the way it is."
Dr. Crump, not everything is black or white. Here is a link for you.

http://www.grammarerrors.com/

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Dr. Bill Crump
Dr. Bill Crump

January 17th, 2011, 10:06 pm #39

Donnie asked me to start a special thread devoted to observations about errors in spelling and grammar--and punctuation. I am happy to comply. Since it seems that posters tend to act negatively whenever they are corrected in any way--whether it's about poor English or faulty theology--this thread at least allows us to post observations of people's English errors without mentioning specific names as such to save them from embarrassment. However, we should at least mention the thread or location wherein the error(s) is/are found and the sentence(s) or phrase(s) involved, along with the appropriate correction(s), so that the poster(s) who made the errors can study them.

Corrections to all errors should always be accompanied by a reference, either printed or online.

This is not a "class" in creative writing.

Let's not get carried away with condemning popular, recognized colloquialisms such as "kinda" and "gotta" and similar words. In fact, "kinda" (meaning "kind of") is a recognized adverb, and "gotta" (meaning "got to" or "have got to") is a recognized verb. Reference: dictionary.com.

I ask that off-topic messages--such as those with an aim to be sarcastic, to insult, and to smear others--not be posted here. Thanks.

====================

[color=#0000FF" size="3" face="times]CM: Original post unedited.[/color]
Thread: The Liberal Mind and Method

Message: "The Sonny Ghost"

Error: Fred wrote: "The Sonny Ghost would then have to intervene and haunt and reak [sic] havoc on this toxic place."

The word is "wreak," not "reak." Perhaps the Dictionary Ghost needs to haunt Fred.
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Dr. Bill Crump
Dr. Bill Crump

January 17th, 2011, 10:59 pm #40

For a man that makes up his own words as his goes......I wouldn't say that you actually use your dictionary, would you?

Abridged or unabridged, well-worded AIN'T anywhere. You only found it under the root of 'word.' You did not and CANNOT find 'well-worded' standing alone....by itself.....anywhere.

Again, William Crump, some of us like rules. It gives us stability. God gives us rules to make us happy and content. Some people will always live outside of those rules and think that it is all a joke. The joke is on them.....and you.
From his desire to remain obtuse, I gather that Dave has never looked in an unabridged dictionary anywhere for "well-worded." Whether it is found under "well" or "word" makes no difference. If Dave wants to broaden his vocabulary and discard his reputation of ignorance, he will realize that "well-worded" is a legitimate word that I certainly did not invent. Does Dave really believe that words MUST stand alone in the dictionary to be legitimate? How absurd! Is Dave now dictating how words are derived? Many complex or hyphenated, legitimate words are derived from simpler words. Such is the case with "well-worded." I'm a bit surprised that Dave refuses to accept that fact. Is Dave really that obtuse? Perhaps he is. More likely, Dave pretends to be obtuse only to perpetuate his useless argument.

We know that "well-worded" can be found under "word" at dictionary.com. An example of an unabridged dictionary that presents "well-worded" under "well" is The Random House Dictionary of the English Language, Second Edition, page 2159.

Don't be so obtuse, Dave.
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