Spelling, Grammar, and Punctuation

Dr. Bill Crump
Dr. Bill Crump

March 15th, 2011, 7:14 pm #251

Phy[sic]ians make mistakes just like everyone else. Yours was a clas[sic]. It was mu[sic] to my ears.

A student whose only goal is to "catch" the teacher often succeeds in embarrassing himself instead. While thinking that he "caught" Dr. Crump about "[sic]," Rocnar embarrassed himself by incorrectly running two words together in the process, and Dr. Crump nailed him for it. That was a sweet symphony to Dr. Crump's ears and marvelous beauty to his eyes.

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Dave
Dave

March 15th, 2011, 7:29 pm #252

Donnie asked me to start a special thread devoted to observations about errors in spelling and grammar--and punctuation. I am happy to comply. Since it seems that posters tend to act negatively whenever they are corrected in any way--whether it's about poor English or faulty theology--this thread at least allows us to post observations of people's English errors without mentioning specific names as such to save them from embarrassment. However, we should at least mention the thread or location wherein the error(s) is/are found and the sentence(s) or phrase(s) involved, along with the appropriate correction(s), so that the poster(s) who made the errors can study them.

Corrections to all errors should always be accompanied by a reference, either printed or online.

This is not a "class" in creative writing.

Let's not get carried away with condemning popular, recognized colloquialisms such as "kinda" and "gotta" and similar words. In fact, "kinda" (meaning "kind of") is a recognized adverb, and "gotta" (meaning "got to" or "have got to") is a recognized verb. Reference: dictionary.com.

I ask that off-topic messages--such as those with an aim to be sarcastic, to insult, and to smear others--not be posted here. Thanks.

====================

[color=#0000FF" size="3" face="times]CM: Original post unedited.[/color]
William Crump, awesome stuff. Doubling up by posting in the grammar thread and the thread you catch it in.
Continue on William!
Continue on!
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Dr. Bill Crump
Dr. Bill Crump

March 15th, 2011, 11:58 pm #253

Dave wrote: "Continue on [sic] William!"

Correction: "Continue on, William!"

Dave is inconsistent about using commas when he addresses someone directly. We have presented the grammatical rule about this matter several times previously. Although Dave DID use a comma when he wrote, "William Crump, awesome stuff," that was not a complete sentence. Dave also wrote another incomplete sentence: "Doubling up by posting in the grammar thread and the thread you catch it in." We would encourage Dave to write full, complete sentences instead of using phrases as his primary means of communication.

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Dave
Dave

March 16th, 2011, 1:33 am #254

Donnie asked me to start a special thread devoted to observations about errors in spelling and grammar--and punctuation. I am happy to comply. Since it seems that posters tend to act negatively whenever they are corrected in any way--whether it's about poor English or faulty theology--this thread at least allows us to post observations of people's English errors without mentioning specific names as such to save them from embarrassment. However, we should at least mention the thread or location wherein the error(s) is/are found and the sentence(s) or phrase(s) involved, along with the appropriate correction(s), so that the poster(s) who made the errors can study them.

Corrections to all errors should always be accompanied by a reference, either printed or online.

This is not a "class" in creative writing.

Let's not get carried away with condemning popular, recognized colloquialisms such as "kinda" and "gotta" and similar words. In fact, "kinda" (meaning "kind of") is a recognized adverb, and "gotta" (meaning "got to" or "have got to") is a recognized verb. Reference: dictionary.com.

I ask that off-topic messages--such as those with an aim to be sarcastic, to insult, and to smear others--not be posted here. Thanks.

====================

[color=#0000FF" size="3" face="times]CM: Original post unedited.[/color]
....and you forgot....William.....my exaggerated use.....of periods....to call attention.....to something....or sound like......a pause.....or like.....it is close.....to a real conversation.

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Dr. Bill Crump
Dr. Bill Crump

March 16th, 2011, 2:50 pm #255

It's good that Dave realizes he has a fetish about his exaggerated use of periods. He now has a much better chance to beat that particular flaw.
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Dave
Dave

March 17th, 2011, 1:34 pm #256

Donnie asked me to start a special thread devoted to observations about errors in spelling and grammar--and punctuation. I am happy to comply. Since it seems that posters tend to act negatively whenever they are corrected in any way--whether it's about poor English or faulty theology--this thread at least allows us to post observations of people's English errors without mentioning specific names as such to save them from embarrassment. However, we should at least mention the thread or location wherein the error(s) is/are found and the sentence(s) or phrase(s) involved, along with the appropriate correction(s), so that the poster(s) who made the errors can study them.

Corrections to all errors should always be accompanied by a reference, either printed or online.

This is not a "class" in creative writing.

Let's not get carried away with condemning popular, recognized colloquialisms such as "kinda" and "gotta" and similar words. In fact, "kinda" (meaning "kind of") is a recognized adverb, and "gotta" (meaning "got to" or "have got to") is a recognized verb. Reference: dictionary.com.

I ask that off-topic messages--such as those with an aim to be sarcastic, to insult, and to smear others--not be posted here. Thanks.

====================

[color=#0000FF" size="3" face="times]CM: Original post unedited.[/color]
I think.....with all the attention that William Crump bestows on me......well, maybe......he does like me after all.
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Rancor
Rancor

March 17th, 2011, 3:52 pm #257

A student whose only goal is to "catch" the teacher often succeeds in embarrassing himself instead. While thinking that he "caught" Dr. Crump about "[sic]," Rocnar embarrassed himself by incorrectly running two words together in the process, and Dr. Crump nailed him for it. That was a sweet symphony to Dr. Crump's ears and marvelous beauty to his eyes.
Dr. Crump, your misspelling of "punctuation" was indeed priceless.

Your "Baby" is tainted and in need of a diaper change.

Your recent mistakes prove my point. We all make mistakes.


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Dr. Bill Crump
Dr. Bill Crump

March 19th, 2011, 3:01 pm #258

Donnie asked me to start a special thread devoted to observations about errors in spelling and grammar--and punctuation. I am happy to comply. Since it seems that posters tend to act negatively whenever they are corrected in any way--whether it's about poor English or faulty theology--this thread at least allows us to post observations of people's English errors without mentioning specific names as such to save them from embarrassment. However, we should at least mention the thread or location wherein the error(s) is/are found and the sentence(s) or phrase(s) involved, along with the appropriate correction(s), so that the poster(s) who made the errors can study them.

Corrections to all errors should always be accompanied by a reference, either printed or online.

This is not a "class" in creative writing.

Let's not get carried away with condemning popular, recognized colloquialisms such as "kinda" and "gotta" and similar words. In fact, "kinda" (meaning "kind of") is a recognized adverb, and "gotta" (meaning "got to" or "have got to") is a recognized verb. Reference: dictionary.com.

I ask that off-topic messages--such as those with an aim to be sarcastic, to insult, and to smear others--not be posted here. Thanks.

====================

[color=#0000FF" size="3" face="times]CM: Original post unedited.[/color]
Error: "Burning embers don't taste none too good, do they?"

Correction: "Burning embers taste none too good, do they?" OR "Burning embers don't taste very good, do they?"

Comment: "None too" means "not too" or "not very." Using them with "don't" creates a double negative.

Reference: dictionary.com





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Joined: January 2nd, 2005, 6:45 am

March 19th, 2011, 8:24 pm #259

[color=#0000FF" size="3" face="times]There may be times when a writer or speaker should not be taken seriously -- comedians or those who'd love to try your patience.

Another example: "Don't repeat it twice again for the second time in a row."

That, TOO, was meant to be funny. LOL[/color]
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Dr. Bill Crump
Dr. Bill Crump

March 28th, 2011, 12:24 am #260

Donnie asked me to start a special thread devoted to observations about errors in spelling and grammar--and punctuation. I am happy to comply. Since it seems that posters tend to act negatively whenever they are corrected in any way--whether it's about poor English or faulty theology--this thread at least allows us to post observations of people's English errors without mentioning specific names as such to save them from embarrassment. However, we should at least mention the thread or location wherein the error(s) is/are found and the sentence(s) or phrase(s) involved, along with the appropriate correction(s), so that the poster(s) who made the errors can study them.

Corrections to all errors should always be accompanied by a reference, either printed or online.

This is not a "class" in creative writing.

Let's not get carried away with condemning popular, recognized colloquialisms such as "kinda" and "gotta" and similar words. In fact, "kinda" (meaning "kind of") is a recognized adverb, and "gotta" (meaning "got to" or "have got to") is a recognized verb. Reference: dictionary.com.

I ask that off-topic messages--such as those with an aim to be sarcastic, to insult, and to smear others--not be posted here. Thanks.

====================

[color=#0000FF" size="3" face="times]CM: Original post unedited.[/color]
Message title: "Dazed and Conffused [sic]"

Correction: "Dazed and Confused"

Comment: "Confused" is spelled with one "f."

Reference: dictionary.com
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