Joined: January 2nd, 2005, 6:45 am

December 19th, 2014, 7:19 am #11

[color=#0000FF" size="4" face="times]John Waddey authored many books and articles regarding change agents and their efforts and intent to restructure the church of Christ. And ConcernedMembers, as you know it well, has a lot to say about change agents!!! The premise is well stated in each of John's articles posted. [/color]
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Joined: January 2nd, 2005, 6:45 am

December 19th, 2014, 7:22 am #12



CM presents

Donnie and Ken

MOST CREATIVE AWARD

2014
[color=#0000FF" size="4" face="times]Thanks, Justice.

But let's get credit to the Holy Scripture, the supporting cast -- just can't do it without the truth.[/color]
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Joined: January 2nd, 2005, 6:45 am

December 19th, 2014, 8:23 am #13

If God were physical, then it would be quite difficult, if not impossible, for Him to be Jesus and for Jesus to be fully God. But John 1 tells us that the Word was WITH God AND the Word WAS God. The Word, being Jesus, was with God in the beginning, and at the same time, that Word was God. Then the Word/God/Jesus became flesh "and dwelt among us." Now, how is all of this possible? Observe:

"And Jesus looking upon them saith, With men it is impossible, but not with God: for with God all things are possible" (Mark 10:27 KJV).

ALL THINGS (even those that boggle the human mind) are possible with God. Jesus also said:

"Jesus said unto him, If thou canst believe, all things are possible to him that believeth" (Mark 9:23 KJV).

The faithful are fully able to believe that Jesus was God on earth and that Jesus was the Word Who was WITH God and WAS God in the beginning.
[color=#0000FF" size="4" face="times](1) There is but ONE GOD, THE FATHER (I Cor. 8:6)
------------------- and --------------------
(2) ONE LORD JESUS CHRIST (I Cor. 8:6)

(1) For there is ONE GOD and FATHER of all (I Tim. 2:5; Eph. 4:6)
------------------- and --------------------
(2) ONE MEDIATOR between God and men, the man CHRIST JESUS (I Tim. 2:5)

(1) GOD (Acts 2:36)
------------------- hath made that same ----------------
(2) JESUS, whom ye have crucified, both LORD and CHRIST (Acts 2:36)

(1) For my FATHER (John 14:28)
------------------- is GREATER THAN -------------------
(2) I (John 14:28)


"The Word (LOGOS) was made flesh[/color]" (John 1:14) [no word substitution allowed].
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Bill
Bill

December 19th, 2014, 8:44 am #14

All things are possible with God, but not all people believe that.
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Justice
Justice

December 19th, 2014, 1:21 pm #15

[color=#0000FF" size="4" face="times]Thanks, Justice.

But let's get credit to the Holy Scripture, the supporting cast -- just can't do it without the truth.[/color]
Thanks Donnie, BTW that was a Justice exclusive. No links. We will reveal the runner up in this category very soon. (Spoiler Alert) it's all Greek to me.
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Bill
Bill

December 19th, 2014, 3:12 pm #16

All things are possible with God, but not all people believe that.
We also know that Jesus is God because:

"Jesus saith unto him, Have I been so long time with you, and yet hast thou not known me, Philip? he that hath seen me hath seen the Father; and how sayest thou then, Shew us the Father?" (John 14:9 KJV).

"I and my Father are one" (John 10:30 KJV).

"Behold, a virgin shall be with child, and shall bring forth a son, and they shall call his name Emmanuel, which being interpreted is, God with us (Matt. 1:23 KJV).

"Let this mind be in you, which was also in Christ Jesus: Who, being in the form of God, thought it not robbery to be equal with God" (Phl 2:5-6 KJV).


According to Jesus, you see Jesus = you see God the Father.

Jesus = Emmanuel = God with us.

The Word (Who was with God and was God in the beginning) became flesh and dwelt among us. Jesus became flesh and dwelt as God among us.

Only one heavenly being became flesh and dwelt among us.

Therefore, Jesus = the Word = God.
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Bill
Bill

December 19th, 2014, 4:53 pm #17



CM presents

Donnie and Ken

MOST CREATIVE AWARD

2014
Justice, it is incomprehensible to Donnie and Ken that anyone would believe that Jesus was the Word Who was with God and was God in the beginning (i.e., Jesus = the Word = God), just as it is incomprehensible to us that Donnie and Ken would believe that Jesus is not eternal.
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Joined: July 29th, 2010, 2:32 pm

December 19th, 2014, 6:44 pm #18

[color=#0000FF" size="4" face="times](1) There is but ONE GOD, THE FATHER (I Cor. 8:6)
------------------- and --------------------
(2) ONE LORD JESUS CHRIST (I Cor. 8:6)

(1) For there is ONE GOD and FATHER of all (I Tim. 2:5; Eph. 4:6)
------------------- and --------------------
(2) ONE MEDIATOR between God and men, the man CHRIST JESUS (I Tim. 2:5)

(1) GOD (Acts 2:36)
------------------- hath made that same ----------------
(2) JESUS, whom ye have crucified, both LORD and CHRIST (Acts 2:36)

(1) For my FATHER (John 14:28)
------------------- is GREATER THAN -------------------
(2) I (John 14:28)


"The Word (LOGOS) was made flesh[/color]" (John 1:14) [no word substitution allowed].
The problem is that people think that Christ is a GOD WORD. Christ or one God has anointed is MESSIAH.

2Chr. 22:7 And the destruction of Ahaziah was of God by coming to Joram: for when he was come, he went out with Jehoram against Jehu the son of Nimshi, whom the LORD had anointed to cut off the house of Ahab.

That did not make him a God person any more than the ROCK was Christ or God's anointed supply of water.

H4886 mâshach maw-shakh' A primitive root; to rub with oil, that is, to anoint; by implication to consecrate; also to paint:—anoint, paint.

ungo to smear or anoint unctus

WE also receive that ANOINTING so we can READ that which God HIDES from the wise or sophists: speakers, singers, instrument players.

1John 2:20 But ye have an unction from the Holy ONE, and ye know all things.


The almost-invisible number of the Little Flock receives A holy spirit or A good conscience by request at baptism. 2 Corinthians 3 Paul said that gives us the power to READ BLACK text on WHITE PAPER and understand that THE LORD IS THAT SPIRIT.

Greek: G5545 chrisma khris'-mah From G5548 ; an unguent or smearing, that is, (figuratively) the special endowment (“chrism”) of the Holy Spirit:—anointing, unction.

The anointing of Jesus meant that HE did not speak anything ON HIS OWN. He was the MAN Jesus of Nazareth.

In Greek: G5547 Christos khris-tos' From G5548 ; anointed, that is, the Messiah, an epithet of Jesus:—Christ.

Get it? the word Christ can be confusing even among the scholars who believe, teach and collect a wage for DENYING that Messiah came IN THE FLESH as opposed to as a ROCK or as the anointing of the Prophets so they spoke what the Spirit OF Christ breathed into them. Spirit means wind or breath and NEVER as a people unless you have been anointed by Apollon as the MARKED FOR AVOIDANCE leader of the Muses.

It is possible for us to be ENDOWED by the Holy Spirit or BREATH of God when we SPEAK that which has been taught and can say "Thus saith the Lord."


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Scripture
Scripture

December 20th, 2014, 2:15 am #19

Perhaps, Ken means "spiritual seed of Abraham"? Ken does not mean actual "sperm'... or maybe he does?
Justice,

Greek word for seed is "sperma."

Men beget children, women bear them. The sperm fertilizes the egg.

Children are begotten of the Father, and born of the mother.

Ken is correct.
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Justice
Justice

December 20th, 2014, 2:31 pm #20


Justice says

********************

May Christians Observe Holidays?

by Wayne Jackson


Is it wrong for Christians to celebrate some of the holidays popular in our society—like giving gifts at Christmas time, allowing children to go trick-or-treating at Halloween, or hunting eggs at Easter?

In considering this issue, several things should be kept in view.

A practice may have originated under certain circumstances but, eventually, have lost that significance—either in whole or at least significantly. There is Bible precedent for dealing with this principle.

Consider the practice of eating meat that had been sacrificed to idols previously—a very lively issue in the first century. Here is the background: A meat sacrifice would be made to an idol. After a certain portion was consumed in sacrificial flames (or by the priests), the balance would be sold as common food in the market. The controversy, therefore, arose: is this meat contaminated simply because it had some connection with an idol?

Paul’s answer is no (see 1 Corinthians 8:1-13). If one has “knowledge”—i.e., that an idol is “nothing”—and his conscience is not offended, he may eat of that meat. It is not contaminated merely by its former association.

Yet, there is this caution: if one is in an environment wherein some “weak” (i.e., without mature knowledge) brother is liable to be damaged, then it would be best to refrain in that instance, lest the weak brother’s conscience be wounded.

It would be wrong to partake religiously of a practice that compromises one’s fidelity to the truth. The apostle deals with such a matter in 1 Corinthians 10. If in a service where sacrifices were being offered to “demons” the Christian were to partake, i.e., have “communion” (koinonia—participation, fellowship), with those involved in the illicit worship, such clearly would be sinful (10:20-21).

To practice Christmas, Halloween, or Easter religiously would be unwarranted. To do so merely as a cultural custom would be a matter of personal judgment.

In Romans 14, Paul argues the general proposition that there will be different levels of knowledge among brethren and that, to a certain extent, these must be accommodated for the sake of Christian unity. For example, some, out of conviction, choose not to eat meats; others see nothing wrong with such a practice.

The apostle instructs that neither individual is to “set at naught” the other. No man is to create a law in areas of expediency and then demand that all others submit. If an overt act of transgression is not the issue, peace must prevail.

Most folks who are rather sensitive about these cultural practices are not consistent entirely in their own conduct. Consider, for example, the celebration of birthdays. In ancient Egypt, the birthdays of the Pharaohs were considered as “holy” days, with no work being done (McClintock and Strong 1969, 817). Moreover, as John Lightfoot noted: “The Jewish schools esteem the keeping of birthdays a part of idolatrous worship” (1979, 217).

Does this mean that if a man in this era gives his wife a birthday present or if we have a birthday party for a child we have compromised our faith? Surely no one will so allege.

What about the man who takes his wife out for dinner and gives her flowers on Valentine’s Day? Has he yielded to the Romish dogma regarding “Saint Valentine”? When we place flowers on the graves of our loved ones, is this the same as the Hindu practice of putting food on the graves of one’s ancestors? Does having a wedding ceremony in a church building imply that we endorse the Catholic notion that marriage is a “church sacrament”? Surely these queries must be answered negatively.

Practices can change with time and mean different things to different people. We must not compromise the truth, but neither are we permitted to make spiritual laws for others.
Arianism is named for Arius, a teacher in the early 4th century A.D. One of the earliest and probably the most important item of debate among early Christians was the subject of Christ’s deity. Was Jesus truly God in the flesh or was Jesus a created being? Was Jesus God or just like God? Arius held that Jesus was created by God as the first act of creation, that Jesus was the crowning glory of all creation. Arianism, then, is the view that Jesus was a created being with divine attributes, but was not divine in and of Himself.

Arianism misunderstands references to Jesus’ being tired (John 4:6) and not knowing the date of His return (Matthew 24:36). Yes, it is difficult to understand how God could be tired and/or not know something, but relegating Jesus to a created being is not the answer. Jesus was fully God, but He was also fully human. Jesus did not become a human being until the incarnation. Therefore, Jesus’ limitations as a human being have no impact on His divine nature or eternality.

A second major misinterpretation in Arianism is the meaning of “firstborn” (Romans 8:29; Colossians 1:15-20). Arians understand “firstborn” in these verses to mean that Jesus was “born” or “created” as the first act of creation. This is not the case. Jesus Himself proclaimed His self-existence and eternality (John 8:58; 10:30). John 1:1-2 tells us that Jesus was “in the beginning with God.” In Bible times, the firstborn son of a family was held in great honor (Genesis 49:3; Exodus 11:5; 34:19; Numbers 3:40; Psalm 89:27; Jeremiah 31:9). It is in this sense that Jesus is God’s firstborn. Jesus is the preeminent member of God’s family. Jesus is the anointed one, the “Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace” (Isaiah 9:6).

After nearly a century of debate at various early church councils, the Christian church officially denounced Arianism as a false doctrine. Since that time, Arianism has never been accepted as a viable doctrine of the Christian faith. Arianism has not died, however. Arianism has continued throughout the centuries in varying forms. The Jehovah’s Witnesses and Mormons of today hold a very Arian-like position on Christ’s nature. Just as the early church did, we must denounce any and all attacks on the deity of our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ.



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