Is “Contemporary Christian ‘Rock’ Music” Satanic?

CCRM-Concerned
CCRM-Concerned

April 20th, 2007, 8:23 pm #1

<font face=arial>While Christian Rock Music has become one of the major enticements promoted by the Charismatic and Community Church Movements in their church and TV-programmed gatherings—and which undoubtedly has infected not only certain mega churches of Christ but also a number of fundamentalist and conservative church groups—there has also surfaced concerns that if this trend continues, the next and future generations will face a seemingly insurmountable task of determining what is reverential in God’s sight and what the pure gospel message is supposed to convey.

Are we in that group that should be concerned about whereto the Christian “Rock” Music is leading the “Christian” youth of this postmodern era, even certain adult “Christians” with similar tendencies or appellations as do the young Christians?

As the passages in Eph. 5:18,19 and Col. 3:16 clearly emphasize the truth that we “let the word of Christ dwell in us richly” and that we “teach and admonish one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs,” do we take such truth to heart or do we let the “rock” music overshadow the truth?

Shouldn’t there be biblical screens that any Christian “rock” music must pass before it can be labeled as “Christian”? Perhaps, the “lyrics” screen would be the easiest form of examination upon which the Christian “rock” music is determined as a failure. What about the “character” screen—in this case, the “attitudes” depicted in the “rock” music and as portrayed by the “performers”? Is it reverential or worshipful; is there any expression of real AWE [not to be confused with the modern definition of the word “awesome”]?

Then, not the least of all and the often ignored “score” screen. Uh-huh! Many will argue that “the arrangement of the musical notes” has nothing to do with passing or failing the “score” screen. Are we prepared to rebut such a notion by stating that while the notes should compliment the words, in no way should the arrangement overshadow the message being conveyed? Otherwise, the “ROCK” music is no longer “Christian”?

Therefore, when the “Contemporary Christian ‘Rock’ Music” fails ANY ONE of the biblical screens, it is or it has become only “Rock” music and Satanic.</font>
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Ken Sublett
Ken Sublett

April 21st, 2007, 12:10 am #2


Rock and Roll really FUELED Great "awakenings" such as the Stoneites at Cane Ridge in 1801. The black influence and charismatic singing is rarely noted by those GENERATED in that movement. However, other observers fill in the blanks. The Blacks were smarter than the masters and had replaced the outlawed drumming with singing and polyrythmic clapping. Modern musicologists see most of the revivalists "hyms" as birthed by Voodoo. The Stoneites added the Shouting Methodists as a ACT OF WORSHIP and that fits the Anglican or Methodist background of the Christian churches radically different from the reverent Presbyterians.

http://www.piney.com/Cane.Ridge.Shouting.Method.html

<font color=blue>Edward Alsworth Ross. "The Crowd". Chapter 3 in Social Psychology: An outline and source book. New York: Macmillan Co. (1919): 43 - 62.

Coe[7] thus accounts for the extraordinary phenomena often manifested in religious assemblies. "The striking psychic manifestations which reach their climax among

(53) us in emotional revivals, camp-meetings, and negro services have a direct relation to certain states of an essentially hypnotic and hallucinatory kind. In various forms such states have appeared and reappeared throughout the history of religion. Examples of what is here referred to are found in the sacred frenzy of the Bacchantes, the trance of the Sibyls, the ecstasy of the Neo-Platonists, the enlightenment that came to Gautama Buddha under the sacred Bo-tree, the visions of the canonized saints, the absorption into God experienced by various mystics, and the religious epidemics of the Middle Ages, such as tarantism and St. Vitus's dance. All these and a multitude of similar phenomena were produced by processes easily recognized by any modern psychologist as automatic and suggestive. </font>

Before the Stoneites and other revivals of what was identical to fairly modern, Pre-Saddam Iraq "christian Devil worship" these people would be burned as witches. This writer has heard articulated the ridicule of people who still fight instruments and the PLAN to try to restore Cane Ridge. The Jubilee oozed out at the same time the Laughing Exercises were attracting the audiences in Nashville.
<font color=blue>Similarly, the phenomenon in Methodist history known as the 'power' was induced by hypnotic processes now well understood,
  • though hidden until long after the days of the Wesleys." "The explanation of the 'power' and similar outbreaks is simple. Under the pressure of religious excitement there occurs a sporadic case of hallucination, or of motor automatism, or of auto-hypnotism, taking the form of trance, visions, voices, or catalepsy.
</font>Consistent with all PAGAN worship and the use of arousal singing and instruments, we know that a musical instrument or its "organic substitute" is a MACHINE for doing hard work or for producing shock and awe. The OBJECT was to drive people into PANIC and this was the laded burden of "spiritual anxiety created by religious ritual" which Jesus OUTLAWED and the equivalent SELF pleasing outlawed by Paul for the synagogue or church. Apollo or Apollyon who HAS unleashed the LOCUSTS or MUSES in John's message is also named FEAR. The same equivalent word defined the musical SERVICE of the Levitical Warrior musicians as HARD BONDAGE. Apollyon is called Phoebus or FEAR: he was the father of the twanging bow to send forth singing arrows (or love arrows with his lyre), musical harmony, thieves and liars.

<font color=blue>The onlookers naturally conceive a more or less distressing fear lest the mysterious power attack their own persons.
  • Fear acts as a suggestion, and the more suggestible soon realize their expectations In accordance with the law of suggestion,
    every new case adds power to the real cause and presently the conditions are right for an epidemic of such experiences."

    "Suggestion works in proportion as it secures a monopoly of attention. Let us ask what, according to this law, will happen to passably suggestible persons who submit themselves to certain well-known revival practices.

    Let us suppose that the notion of a striking transformation has been held before the subject's mind for days, weeks, or even years; let us suppose that the subject has finally been induced to go to the penitent form; here, we will suppose, prayers full of sympathy and emotional earnestness are offered for him, and that everything has been so arranged as to produce a climax in which he will finally believe that the connection between himself and God is now accomplished.
The leader says to him: 'Do you now believe? Then you are saved.' Is it not evident that this whole process favors the production of a profound emotional transformation directly through suggestion?"</font>

There can be little doubt that modern outlaw men who lie, cheat and steal and says that the SPIRIT told them to deliberately sow discord have had their minds disturbed by a life of loud noise.

Answer: John identifies the Mother of Harlots and the singers and instrument players as SORCERERS who HAD deceived the whole world. The clear statement is that the SPIRIT which indwells them is that of Satan. Hitler defines the same process.
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Amazed
Amazed

April 26th, 2007, 9:47 pm #3

<font face=arial>While Christian Rock Music has become one of the major enticements promoted by the Charismatic and Community Church Movements in their church and TV-programmed gatherings—and which undoubtedly has infected not only certain mega churches of Christ but also a number of fundamentalist and conservative church groups—there has also surfaced concerns that if this trend continues, the next and future generations will face a seemingly insurmountable task of determining what is reverential in God’s sight and what the pure gospel message is supposed to convey.

Are we in that group that should be concerned about whereto the Christian “Rock” Music is leading the “Christian” youth of this postmodern era, even certain adult “Christians” with similar tendencies or appellations as do the young Christians?

As the passages in Eph. 5:18,19 and Col. 3:16 clearly emphasize the truth that we “let the word of Christ dwell in us richly” and that we “teach and admonish one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs,” do we take such truth to heart or do we let the “rock” music overshadow the truth?

Shouldn’t there be biblical screens that any Christian “rock” music must pass before it can be labeled as “Christian”? Perhaps, the “lyrics” screen would be the easiest form of examination upon which the Christian “rock” music is determined as a failure. What about the “character” screen—in this case, the “attitudes” depicted in the “rock” music and as portrayed by the “performers”? Is it reverential or worshipful; is there any expression of real AWE [not to be confused with the modern definition of the word “awesome”]?

Then, not the least of all and the often ignored “score” screen. Uh-huh! Many will argue that “the arrangement of the musical notes” has nothing to do with passing or failing the “score” screen. Are we prepared to rebut such a notion by stating that while the notes should compliment the words, in no way should the arrangement overshadow the message being conveyed? Otherwise, the “ROCK” music is no longer “Christian”?

Therefore, when the “Contemporary Christian ‘Rock’ Music” fails ANY ONE of the biblical screens, it is or it has become only “Rock” music and Satanic.</font>
Lyrics from "Strong Tower" by Kutless (a Christian Rock band)

When I wander through the desert
And I'm longing for my home
All my dreams have gone astray
When I'm stranded in the valley
And I'm tired and all alone
It seems like I've lost my way

I go runnign to Your moutain
Where your mercy sets me free

(chorus)
You are my strong tower
Shelter over me
Beautiful and mighty
Everlasting King
You are my strong tower
Fortress when I'm weak
Your name is true and holy
And Your face is all I seek

In the middle of my darkness
In the nidst of all my fear
You're my refuge and my hope
When the storm of life is raging
And the thunder's all I hear
You speak softly to my soul





VERY Satanic.

Get a life.


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Ken Sublett
Ken Sublett

April 27th, 2007, 12:02 am #4

Sounds like a proposition to me! Like all tham praise ditties.

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Chris
Chris

April 29th, 2007, 1:22 pm #5

Nice one Ken... Thanks for addressing the lyrics to the above song... God as our refuge, shelter and strong tower... Sounds pretty satanic to me...

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Dr. Bill Crump
Dr. Bill Crump

April 29th, 2007, 9:10 pm #6

Lyrics from "Strong Tower" by Kutless (a Christian Rock band)

When I wander through the desert
And I'm longing for my home
All my dreams have gone astray
When I'm stranded in the valley
And I'm tired and all alone
It seems like I've lost my way

I go runnign to Your moutain
Where your mercy sets me free

(chorus)
You are my strong tower
Shelter over me
Beautiful and mighty
Everlasting King
You are my strong tower
Fortress when I'm weak
Your name is true and holy
And Your face is all I seek

In the middle of my darkness
In the nidst of all my fear
You're my refuge and my hope
When the storm of life is raging
And the thunder's all I hear
You speak softly to my soul





VERY Satanic.

Get a life.

Here are a few observations about the lyrics to the song "Strong Tower":

The names of God, Jesus, Christ, Holy Spirit, or Savior do not appear at all. The nonspecific word "King" appears only once (BTW, some folks consider Satan as their "King").

The personal pronouns "I, me, my, or mine" occur 21 times.

Nonspecific pronouns such as "you and your" plus the contraction "you're" occur only 8 times. Although they supposedly refer to an unspecified deity, they could apply to anyone.

The lyrics mention the one in need 12 times:

1. Wandering
2. Longing
3. Dreams gone astray
4. Stranded
5. Tired
6. Alone
7. Lost my way
8. Weak
9. Darkness
10. Fear
11. Storm of life
12. Thunder

The lyrics also mention an unnamed entity, supposedly an unspecified deity, 15 times:

1. Mountain
2. Mercy sets free
3. Strong tower
4. Shelter
5. Beautiful
6. Mighty
7. Everlasting King
8. Strong tower
9. Fortress
10. True
11. Holy
12. Face
13. Refuge
14. Hope
15. Speak softly

Because the lyrics do not mention God, Jesus, Christ, Holy Spirit, or Savior, they could imply anyone or any deity. Moreover, the lyrics mention the one in need 33 times (21+12), compared to 23 times (8+15) for the unspecified deity.

If this is a song that is supposed to praise and glorify God, it focuses more on self and fails to mention His name. So you seek, it actually could be used by Satanists because of its nonspecific sentiment.
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Ken Sublett
Ken Sublett

April 30th, 2007, 1:38 am #7

I, too, copied the song and made the ME bold.
then I made your in blue.
And then I trashed it after getting sick.

This IS the meaning of all selfl composed praise songs.
Me is the object and the performance is ME - centered.

I also noted the whiney-piney self pity
and concluded the man has no faith at all and less manliness.

If he were a disciple He would use the
songs written by the Spirit of Christ.

I can see the performers and feel all of
my testesterone being drained.

Many ancient writers claim that poets and
song writers by definition lie because they are
several removes from the truth and the style
is identified by John as Sorcery because someone
intends to keep your eyes OFF Jesus.

The ZOE movement of Looking to the Hills
literally lies aboutthe Bible and ADVISES that
we look to the HILLS GODS rather than to the
creator of the hills.

Thanks for a good review.
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Joe Spivy
Joe Spivy

April 30th, 2007, 8:20 pm #8

Some have mentioned "problems" with the lyrics of the song "Strong Tower."

"God" is not mentioned anywhere... So let's throw out Esther.

It's "whiney" and has too many references to "I" and "me"... so let's throw out many of the Psalms.

The "King" and the "you" could apply to anyone (some might even apply it to Satan!)... of course the biblically illiterate may be unaware of the many similarities between the words found in the song and those found in a book often referred to as the book of Psalms (see just a few examples below).

I assume all those who have commented above are biblically literate and their comments arise more out of their dislike for "Christian Rock" (which I don't particularly like either) than out of any conviction that the phrases below are really somehow "Satanic" (unless you wish to ascribe to divinely inspired literature such a description).

Strong tower (Psalm 61)
Wandered (“whining?”—they cried out) (Psalm 107)
Stranded in the Valley (Psalm 23)
Tired and All Alone (Like the “bird” of Psalm 102:7)
Your mountain (Psalm 43:3)
Aren’t sure who the "King" is? (Psalm 24:7-8)
Your face is all I seek (Psalm 27:8)

You don't like Christian Rock, fine. You don't like the song, fine. You can't see how these words have any value (I'm not speaking of the performance of the song but rather the words to the song as shared above), fine.

Personally, I would rather have more overt mentions of "God" or "Lord" or "Father" as is usually (but not always) found in inspired material (Bible). However, much of what is found above seems to be more a display of a bias against Christian Rock (which is not completely unfounded) than it is a critical consideration of the words to the song.

God bless.

Joe



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Ken Sublett
Ken Sublett

April 30th, 2007, 11:34 pm #9

<font face=arial>While Christian Rock Music has become one of the major enticements promoted by the Charismatic and Community Church Movements in their church and TV-programmed gatherings—and which undoubtedly has infected not only certain mega churches of Christ but also a number of fundamentalist and conservative church groups—there has also surfaced concerns that if this trend continues, the next and future generations will face a seemingly insurmountable task of determining what is reverential in God’s sight and what the pure gospel message is supposed to convey.

Are we in that group that should be concerned about whereto the Christian “Rock” Music is leading the “Christian” youth of this postmodern era, even certain adult “Christians” with similar tendencies or appellations as do the young Christians?

As the passages in Eph. 5:18,19 and Col. 3:16 clearly emphasize the truth that we “let the word of Christ dwell in us richly” and that we “teach and admonish one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs,” do we take such truth to heart or do we let the “rock” music overshadow the truth?

Shouldn’t there be biblical screens that any Christian “rock” music must pass before it can be labeled as “Christian”? Perhaps, the “lyrics” screen would be the easiest form of examination upon which the Christian “rock” music is determined as a failure. What about the “character” screen—in this case, the “attitudes” depicted in the “rock” music and as portrayed by the “performers”? Is it reverential or worshipful; is there any expression of real AWE [not to be confused with the modern definition of the word “awesome”]?

Then, not the least of all and the often ignored “score” screen. Uh-huh! Many will argue that “the arrangement of the musical notes” has nothing to do with passing or failing the “score” screen. Are we prepared to rebut such a notion by stating that while the notes should compliment the words, in no way should the arrangement overshadow the message being conveyed? Otherwise, the “ROCK” music is no longer “Christian”?

Therefore, when the “Contemporary Christian ‘Rock’ Music” fails ANY ONE of the biblical screens, it is or it has become only “Rock” music and Satanic.</font>
Firstly, I have never heard a singy-clappy who had ever gave evidence of reading Esther. Paul commanded and all faithful practiced teaching THAT WHICH HAS BEEN TAUGHT: we don't need for God to be mentioned where they were pretty sure that they had left God in a box in a house in Jerusalem.

Nextly, I have never heard a church obeying DIRECT COMMANDS to SPEAK that which is written where SPEAK is the opposite of poetry or music.

Thenly, maybe you need to read the 11th chapter of Esther!

MEly, I don't WANDER around like a lost calf anymore; too bad about those trying to seek the FACE of God or get LIFTED UP into His presence by the Musical Elevators.
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Dr. Bill Crump
Dr. Bill Crump

May 1st, 2007, 2:06 pm #10

Some have mentioned "problems" with the lyrics of the song "Strong Tower."

"God" is not mentioned anywhere... So let's throw out Esther.

It's "whiney" and has too many references to "I" and "me"... so let's throw out many of the Psalms.

The "King" and the "you" could apply to anyone (some might even apply it to Satan!)... of course the biblically illiterate may be unaware of the many similarities between the words found in the song and those found in a book often referred to as the book of Psalms (see just a few examples below).

I assume all those who have commented above are biblically literate and their comments arise more out of their dislike for "Christian Rock" (which I don't particularly like either) than out of any conviction that the phrases below are really somehow "Satanic" (unless you wish to ascribe to divinely inspired literature such a description).

Strong tower (Psalm 61)
Wandered (“whining?”—they cried out) (Psalm 107)
Stranded in the Valley (Psalm 23)
Tired and All Alone (Like the “bird” of Psalm 102:7)
Your mountain (Psalm 43:3)
Aren’t sure who the "King" is? (Psalm 24:7-8)
Your face is all I seek (Psalm 27:8)

You don't like Christian Rock, fine. You don't like the song, fine. You can't see how these words have any value (I'm not speaking of the performance of the song but rather the words to the song as shared above), fine.

Personally, I would rather have more overt mentions of "God" or "Lord" or "Father" as is usually (but not always) found in inspired material (Bible). However, much of what is found above seems to be more a display of a bias against Christian Rock (which is not completely unfounded) than it is a critical consideration of the words to the song.

God bless.

Joe


Joe, nice try rationalizing all the "hidden" meanings allegedly present in the song, but admit it, "Strong Tower" is a bit too self-centered. It seems that many of the "modern" songs today stress the I, me, my, and mine over God. You would think that a song praising God would at least mention His name.

Those who know little to nothing of God would have difficulty identifying exactly to whom the song refers. If "modern" Christian songs want to evangelize, then they should be more direct about identifying God/Christ by name, Who He is, and how to become a Christian.
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