"I am Music and I write the songs."

Anonymous
Anonymous

June 13th, 2005, 10:35 pm #31

Your question is better rephrased to say, "Should we ignore the teachings of the New Testament and fall back on the Old Testament to satisfy our personal desires for things that the New Testament does not authorize or show precedence?"

The Old Testament has been fulfilled in Christ, Who told us through the apostles that the Mosaic Law no longer justifies us (Gal. 5:4 KJV).
This is a typical response from this group; dodge the question and twist the truth. The question only required a "yes" or a "no". I think I read that, somewhere...............?
Quote
Share

Dr. Bill Crump
Dr. Bill Crump

June 14th, 2005, 12:48 am #32

And yet, we know from Acts 2:46, Acts 3:1, Acts 5:20, and Acts 5:42, that the early church met in the Temple Courts as well as houses.

From this we can make the NECESSARY INFERENCE that they worshipped God in the Temple. Especially since they were all Jews or Proselytes and did not consider themselves something other than Jewish at that point.

Hence we can ascertain that they would have worshipped with both Psalm 118 and Psalm 136, giving us a patter for the 7/11 songs you and Donnie denigrate with such vim and vigor.
My earlier premise still stands: the use of repetitive phrases in Christian music would be justified if John could produce New Testament Scriptures with comparable repetitions. The Scriptures John quotes contain no examples of repetitions. Time to move on.
Quote
Share

Dr. Bill Crump
Dr. Bill Crump

June 14th, 2005, 12:55 am #33

This is a typical response from this group; dodge the question and twist the truth. The question only required a "yes" or a "no". I think I read that, somewhere...............?
Earlier I posed this question: "Should we ignore the teachings of the New Testament and fall back on the Old Testament to satisfy our personal desires for things that the New Testament does not authorize or show precedence?"

This also required just a "yes" or "no." I see that "Anonymous" decided to dodge the question (and twist the truth to boot). Ah, most typical of change agents, most typical.

Time to move on, folks.
Quote
Share

Ken Sublett
Ken Sublett

June 14th, 2005, 2:02 am #34

I received the following email and I thought you might be interested;

"Thanks for your heads-up about worship leaders --article dated April 6, '03.( http://www.concernedmembers.com/editori ... .htm#part7 ) I wasn't aware of Amos 6.5. Your article also reminded me of the song (I think written by Barry Manilow) that goes "I am Music and I write the songs."
God bless, Sandra



I looked the words up, and this is what I found;

I Write The Songs


-Artist: Barry Manilow as sung on "Greatest Hits" -Arista A2L 8601
-peak Billboard position # 1 in 1976
-Words and Music by Bruce Johnston
(apparently Barry *doesn't* "write the songs"!)

I've been alive forever, and I wrote the very first song
I put the words and the melodies together
I am music and I write the songs

CHORUS
I write the songs that make the whole world sing
I write the songs of love and special things
I write the songs that make the young girls cry
I write the songs, I write the songs

My home lies deep within you
And I've got my own place in your soul
Now, when I look out through your eyes
I'm young again, even though I'm very old

CHORUS

Oh my music makes you dance
And gives you spirit to take a chance
And I wrote some rock 'n' roll so you can move
Music fills your heart
Well, that's a real fine place to start
It's from me it's for you
It's from you, it's for me
It's a worldwide symphony

CHORUS
CHORUS

I am Music (music) and I write the songs


Transcribed by Robin Hood

These lyrics were transcribed from the specific recording mentioned above
and do not necessarily correspond with lyrics from other recordings, sheet
music, songbooks or lyrics printed on album jackets.
The Passover in which Jesus instituted the Lord's Supper because the Jew's expectation that John the Baptist would announce Messiah, the fruit of the vine would be UNFERMENTED and they would have sung Psalm 137 which speaks of HANGING UP OUR HARPS--another subject.

<font color=blue>In time, the term Hallel came to mean the "Great Hallel," Psalm 136, which is used in the morning service on the Sabbath, festivals, and during the Passover seder. The "half-Hallel" (parts of Psalms 115 and 116 are omitted) is used on the last six days of PASSOVER and on the NEW MOON.

"Hallel, in Jewish ritual, selection from the Psalms, chanted as part of the liturgy during certain festivals. The more frequently used selection includes Psalms 113-118 and is known as the Egyptian Hallel, presumably because Psalm 114 begins, "When Israel went out of Egypt" It is sung in synagogues on the first two days of Passover, on Shabuoth, on Sukkot, on each morning of the eight days of Hanukkah, and at the close of the Seder.
  • "The Hallel through the generations, on specific occasions: Pesachim 117a
    "Hallel requires a full stomach and a satisfied spirit: Taanis 25b-26a
    The READING is beloved to the people, and so they LISTEN closely: Megillah 21b

    "The Hallel as an Institution of the Prophets, to use to PRAY for salvation from danger: Pesachim 117a [2x] Saying the Hallel daily is blasphemous: Shabbos 118b
</font>However, PAGAN singing was not RECITING or as Paul commanded SPEAKING:

<font color=blue> "An artificial, effeminate music which should relax the soul, frittering the melody, and displacing the power and majesty of divine harmony by tricks of art, and giddy, thoughtless, heartless, souless versifying would be meet company." (Barnes, Albert, Amos, p. 303).

"Jingling, banging, and rattling accompanied heathen cults, and the frenzying shawms of a dozen ecstatic cries intoxicated the masses. Amid this euphoric farewell feast of a dying civilization, the voices of nonconformists were emerging from places of Jewish and early Christian worship; Philo of Alexandria had already emphasized the ethical qualities of music, spurning the 'effeminate' art of his Gentile surroundings.
  • Similarly, early synagogue song intentionally foregoes artistic perfection, renounces the playing of instruments,
    and attaches itself entirely to the WORD--the TEXT of the Bible" (Encyclopaedia Judaica, 1971 ed., s.v. "Music")
</font>WOW! That sounds like what JESUS exampled and PAUL commanded and the church PRACTICED for at least 350 years.

ALL instrumental Psalms and many others are not WORSHIP MUSIC. Rather, because they were composed by the WARRIOR KING and his people mostly, they were WARRIOR CHANTS. They intended to be boast songs and instill FEAR or PANIC in the enemy.

People have always known that EXCITING music creates the impulses of FIGHT, FLIGHT or sexuality.

When SPOKEN with ONE MIND and ONE MOUTH as "that which is written" in Romans 15 as the only way to Glorify God, the purpose was to SYNAGOGUE or teach the History of God by using metrical poems--intended to be recited--so that we can COME LEARN OF ME where ME is Jesus Christ.
Quote
Share

Ken Sublett
Ken Sublett

June 14th, 2005, 5:49 pm #35

Paul commanded that we speak "with one mouth and one voice" and use THAT WHICH IS WRITTEN as a way to TEACH and also GLORIFY God. Psalms, hymns and spiritual songs are all TITLES of the BOOK of Psalms in the Greek version. In addition, Maschils were proverbs or dark sayings.

The Psalms are in 5 books to fit the five books of Moses roughly. Others are a poetic version of prose history. Most of the instrumental psalms were warrior chants to drive the enemy into panic.

If you will look at Psalm 136 which was sung at Passover, you will see that singing it or SPEAKING it in the assembly (synagogue) would TEACH the Old Testament history.

This was NOT as a form of ceremonial ritual but was for EDUCATION. you can sing about bashing out baby's heads IF you are teaching history. Not to be used to PRAISE in the sense of trying to WIN THE WORSHIP WAR over others. Please note that Psalm 136 is not a DANCING DITTY but a whole history of the Jews from a FAVORABLE standpoint. Other Psalms cover the same history--as did Peter and Stephen--but specificially show that the LOSS OF REDEMPTION was caused by MUSICAL IDOLATRY and not holding a Holy Convocation on the Sabbath to READ or REHEARSE whatever document they had or a Patriarch knew:

<font color=blue>O give thanks unto the Lord; for he is good: for his mercy endureth for ever. Psalm 136:1

O give thanks unto the God of gods: for his mercy endureth for ever. Psalm 136:2</font>
  • We worship Jehovhah.
    There are many "elohim" but
    Jehovah is OUR Elohim
<font color=blue>O give thanks to the Lord (Adown) of lords: for his mercy endureth for ever. Psalm 136:3

To him who alone doeth great wonders: for his mercy endureth for ever. Psalm 136:4

To him that by wisdom made the heavens: for his mercy endureth for ever. Psalm 136:5
  • IN the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. John 1:1
    The same was in the beginning with God. John 1:2
    All things were made by him; and without him was not any thing made that was made. John 1:3

    Proverbs 8 makes this WISDOM.
To him that stretched out the earth above the waters: for his mercy endureth for ever. Psalm 136:6

To him that made great lights: for his mercy endureth for ever: Psalm 136:7

The sun to rule by day: for his mercy endureth for ever: Psalm 136:8

The moon and stars to rule by night: for his mercy endureth for ever. Psalm 136:9

To him that smote Egypt in their firstborn: for his mercy endureth for ever: Psalm 136:10

And brought out Israel from among them: for his mercy endureth for ever: Psalm 136:11

With a strong hand, and with a stretched out arm: for his mercy endureth for ever. Psalm 136:12

To him which divided the Red sea into parts: for his mercy endureth for ever: Psalm 136:13

And made Israel to pass through the midst of it: for his mercy endureth for ever: Psalm 136:14

But overthrew Pharaoh and his host in the Red sea: for his mercy endureth for ever. Psalm 136:15

To him which led his people through the wilderness: for his mercy endureth for ever. Psalm 136:16

To him which smote great kings: for his mercy endureth for ever: Psalm 136:17

And slew famous kings: for his mercy endureth for ever: Psalm 136:18

Sihon king of the Amorites: for his mercy endureth for ever: Psalm 136:19

And Og the king of Bashan: for his mercy endureth for ever: Psalm 136:20

And gave their land for an heritage: for his mercy endureth for ever: Psalm 136:21

Even an heritage unto Israel his servant: for his mercy endureth for ever. Psalm 136:22

Who remembered us in our low estate: for his mercy endureth for ever: Psalm 136:23

And hath redeemed us from our enemies: for his mercy endureth for ever. Psalm 136:24

Who giveth food to all flesh: for his mercy endureth for ever. Psalm 136:25

O give thanks unto the God of heaven: for his mercy endureth for ever. Psalm 136</font>

Now, try singing or chanting this NEXT SUNDAY and let everyone RESPOND and you will be oky doky. Better yet, rather than a feel good SOP from a Sophist, let someone fully explain the HISTORY and obey the COMMANDMENT to the elders to "teach that which has been taught."

I will look at some other Psalms to show why YOU should be teaching THEM rather than the insane babbling of erotic songs written by some guy who couldn't pass Bible 101aaa, card class, slow ones in the slow group.
Quote
Share

Anonymous
Anonymous

June 18th, 2005, 2:32 am #36

There is obvious repetition in this beautiful psalm but it is not the same as the 7/11 song.

In this psalm each line or thought builds upon the line or thought that it precedes.

Notice:

<font size=3 color=blue>
“…give thanks to the Lord.”

“…give thanks to God of gods.”

“…give thanks to Lord of lords.”
</font>

This psalm has some deep teachings in it, cf. ”…To him that smote Egypt in their firstborn…” or “…To him that made great lights…” or “The sun to rule by day:”

Find a 7/11 song that has all of this in it and I will lead the song myself!

God bless, 2preach
Hey, Jimmy,

How ya doing??
Quote
Share

Donnie Cruz
Donnie Cruz

June 18th, 2005, 2:24 pm #37

I received the following email and I thought you might be interested;

"Thanks for your heads-up about worship leaders --article dated April 6, '03.( http://www.concernedmembers.com/editori ... .htm#part7 ) I wasn't aware of Amos 6.5. Your article also reminded me of the song (I think written by Barry Manilow) that goes "I am Music and I write the songs."
God bless, Sandra



I looked the words up, and this is what I found;

I Write The Songs


-Artist: Barry Manilow as sung on "Greatest Hits" -Arista A2L 8601
-peak Billboard position # 1 in 1976
-Words and Music by Bruce Johnston
(apparently Barry *doesn't* "write the songs"!)

I've been alive forever, and I wrote the very first song
I put the words and the melodies together
I am music and I write the songs

CHORUS
I write the songs that make the whole world sing
I write the songs of love and special things
I write the songs that make the young girls cry
I write the songs, I write the songs

My home lies deep within you
And I've got my own place in your soul
Now, when I look out through your eyes
I'm young again, even though I'm very old

CHORUS

Oh my music makes you dance
And gives you spirit to take a chance
And I wrote some rock 'n' roll so you can move
Music fills your heart
Well, that's a real fine place to start
It's from me it's for you
It's from you, it's for me
It's a worldwide symphony

CHORUS
CHORUS

I am Music (music) and I write the songs


Transcribed by Robin Hood

These lyrics were transcribed from the specific recording mentioned above
and do not necessarily correspond with lyrics from other recordings, sheet
music, songbooks or lyrics printed on album jackets.
<font size=3 face=Times New Roman>It’s unquestionably the Madison’s “Worship Leader’s” thrill and pleasure to bring his elite musicians to a performance high with excessively repetitious lines from a number of 7/11 musical “praise” pieces. [Note: We have already defined what 7/11 music means. Also, while his “Praise Team” members may not use a piano, trumpets or drums, each has his/her individual microphone and is very capable of also making those unintelligible howling/barking/whistling noises that simulate musical instrumentation anyway, not excluding rhythmic handclapping.]

Their multi-tasking capabilities are admirable? No, I wouldn’t bother to sit in the balcony where I could watch Keith’s musicians perform. But picture this during the observance of the Lord’s Supper (even if not all of these tasks occur at the same time)—holding a microphone … holding [?] and reading the sheet music and singing … partaking of the bread … humming … doing the ooh-ooh-ooh-ooh-ooh … [clapping is one of those activities but is not done here] … partaking of the cup … more humming or making those unintelligible sounds … being in sync with the projected words on the screen vs. the sheet music … etc., etc. Oh, plus … worshipping or really commemorating the suffering and death of the Savior … while busily performing various tasks!

Oops … yes, an example of another 7/11 musical piece that occupies 2 full pages in Keith’s notebook of some 200+ “Songs of Worship.” On the front cover at the bottom, it says: “A supplemental song booklet compiled by the Worship Ministry of the Madison Church of Christ.” Believe me, it is THE MUSIC BOOK—not “a supplemental song booklet”—that the “contemporary worship” group uses. It is this group’s MAIN “praise” songbook. The regular hymnbook of 900 songs, as a matter of fact, is HARDLY supplemental. Why? Hymns are on the verge of extinction—this would make a good topic of discussion … by the way.

I’ll append the musical notes in order to give you an idea of why I think this piece is a musical exercise to perfection. Time sig. is 4/4 and key of b-flat … the repeated lines are mostly eighth notes.
  • TITLE: “Days of Elijah”

    <font color=indigo>[v.1] These are the days of Elijah … … …
    [v.1] These are the days of Your servant Moses … … …

    [v.2] These are the days of Ezekiel … … …
    [v.2] These are the days of Your servant David … … …

    [17 Signo] Behold He comes, riding on the clouds,
    shining like the sun at the trumpet call.
    So lift your voice, it’s the year of Jubilee
    and out of Zion’s hill salvation comes. And [to v.2] …
    comes. [2 D.S.] comes [3].

    There’s no God like Jehovah. [d-d-d-d-d-d-d-d]
    There’s no God like Jehovah. [e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e]
    There’s no God like Jehovah. [d-d-d-d-d-d-d-d]
    There’s no God like Jehovah. [c-c-c-c-c-c-c-c]
    There’s no God like Jehovah. [f-f-f-f-f-f-f-f]
    There’s no God like Jehovah. [g-g-g-g-g-g-g-g]
    There’s no God like Jehovah. [f-f-f-f-f-f-f-f]
    There’s no God like Jehovah. [f-f-f-f-f-f-f-f]
    There’s no God like Jehovah. [b-b-b-b-b-b-b-b]
    There’s no God like Jehovah. [b-b-b-b-b-b-b-b]
    There’s no God like Jehovah. [b-b-b-b-b-b-b-b]
    There’s no God like Jehovah. [a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a]
    There’s no God like Jehovah. [high d-d-d-d-d-d-d-d]
    There’s no God like Jehovah. [high e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e]
    There’s no God like Jehovah! [high d-d-d-d-d-d-d-dc] [D.S.] comes.

    Who was and Who is and Who is to come!
    Who was and Who is and Who is to come.</font>
_________________________________________

Did you keep up with the words and the number of repetitions and the way the music might sound to you?

Well … well … well! [I repeated “well” only three times … or four times?]

Donnie </font>
Quote
Share

Dr. Bill Crump
Dr. Bill Crump

June 18th, 2005, 2:36 pm #38

Paul commanded that we speak "with one mouth and one voice" and use THAT WHICH IS WRITTEN as a way to TEACH and also GLORIFY God. Psalms, hymns and spiritual songs are all TITLES of the BOOK of Psalms in the Greek version. In addition, Maschils were proverbs or dark sayings.

The Psalms are in 5 books to fit the five books of Moses roughly. Others are a poetic version of prose history. Most of the instrumental psalms were warrior chants to drive the enemy into panic.

If you will look at Psalm 136 which was sung at Passover, you will see that singing it or SPEAKING it in the assembly (synagogue) would TEACH the Old Testament history.

This was NOT as a form of ceremonial ritual but was for EDUCATION. you can sing about bashing out baby's heads IF you are teaching history. Not to be used to PRAISE in the sense of trying to WIN THE WORSHIP WAR over others. Please note that Psalm 136 is not a DANCING DITTY but a whole history of the Jews from a FAVORABLE standpoint. Other Psalms cover the same history--as did Peter and Stephen--but specificially show that the LOSS OF REDEMPTION was caused by MUSICAL IDOLATRY and not holding a Holy Convocation on the Sabbath to READ or REHEARSE whatever document they had or a Patriarch knew:

<font color=blue>O give thanks unto the Lord; for he is good: for his mercy endureth for ever. Psalm 136:1

O give thanks unto the God of gods: for his mercy endureth for ever. Psalm 136:2</font>
  • We worship Jehovhah.
    There are many "elohim" but
    Jehovah is OUR Elohim
<font color=blue>O give thanks to the Lord (Adown) of lords: for his mercy endureth for ever. Psalm 136:3

To him who alone doeth great wonders: for his mercy endureth for ever. Psalm 136:4

To him that by wisdom made the heavens: for his mercy endureth for ever. Psalm 136:5
  • IN the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. John 1:1
    The same was in the beginning with God. John 1:2
    All things were made by him; and without him was not any thing made that was made. John 1:3

    Proverbs 8 makes this WISDOM.
To him that stretched out the earth above the waters: for his mercy endureth for ever. Psalm 136:6

To him that made great lights: for his mercy endureth for ever: Psalm 136:7

The sun to rule by day: for his mercy endureth for ever: Psalm 136:8

The moon and stars to rule by night: for his mercy endureth for ever. Psalm 136:9

To him that smote Egypt in their firstborn: for his mercy endureth for ever: Psalm 136:10

And brought out Israel from among them: for his mercy endureth for ever: Psalm 136:11

With a strong hand, and with a stretched out arm: for his mercy endureth for ever. Psalm 136:12

To him which divided the Red sea into parts: for his mercy endureth for ever: Psalm 136:13

And made Israel to pass through the midst of it: for his mercy endureth for ever: Psalm 136:14

But overthrew Pharaoh and his host in the Red sea: for his mercy endureth for ever. Psalm 136:15

To him which led his people through the wilderness: for his mercy endureth for ever. Psalm 136:16

To him which smote great kings: for his mercy endureth for ever: Psalm 136:17

And slew famous kings: for his mercy endureth for ever: Psalm 136:18

Sihon king of the Amorites: for his mercy endureth for ever: Psalm 136:19

And Og the king of Bashan: for his mercy endureth for ever: Psalm 136:20

And gave their land for an heritage: for his mercy endureth for ever: Psalm 136:21

Even an heritage unto Israel his servant: for his mercy endureth for ever. Psalm 136:22

Who remembered us in our low estate: for his mercy endureth for ever: Psalm 136:23

And hath redeemed us from our enemies: for his mercy endureth for ever. Psalm 136:24

Who giveth food to all flesh: for his mercy endureth for ever. Psalm 136:25

O give thanks unto the God of heaven: for his mercy endureth for ever. Psalm 136</font>

Now, try singing or chanting this NEXT SUNDAY and let everyone RESPOND and you will be oky doky. Better yet, rather than a feel good SOP from a Sophist, let someone fully explain the HISTORY and obey the COMMANDMENT to the elders to "teach that which has been taught."

I will look at some other Psalms to show why YOU should be teaching THEM rather than the insane babbling of erotic songs written by some guy who couldn't pass Bible 101aaa, card class, slow ones in the slow group.
According to the Change Movement and proponents of contemporary Christian music (CCM), any kind of music, including the raucous rap, rock, and pop, is acceptable in worship, as long as there are "Christian" lyrics. The purpose is to play that music which most appeals to the people to work them up and turn them on. That philosophy comes directly from the "Purpose Driven" publications of Rick Warren, who says that there is no such thing as "Christian" music, only "Christian" lyrics. In other words, music has no bearing on Christianity or moral behavior, for music is "amoral."

Dashing such ludicrous philosophy to bits is Kimberly Smith, who has just published a new book that dispels the myth that music is amoral. It is appropriately titled "Music and Morals: Dispelling the Myth That Music Is Amoral" (WinePress Publishing, 2005).

"Music and Morals" is Smith's third title that focuses on biblical principles in Christian music. Her other two titles are "Oh, Be Careful Little Ears" and "Let Those Who Have Ears to Hear."

Those interested in the new book may go to the "Biblical Principles in Music" web site at:

http://www.musicandmorals.com.
Quote
Share

B
B

June 27th, 2005, 4:36 am #39

<font size=3 face=Times New Roman>It’s unquestionably the Madison’s “Worship Leader’s” thrill and pleasure to bring his elite musicians to a performance high with excessively repetitious lines from a number of 7/11 musical “praise” pieces. [Note: We have already defined what 7/11 music means. Also, while his “Praise Team” members may not use a piano, trumpets or drums, each has his/her individual microphone and is very capable of also making those unintelligible howling/barking/whistling noises that simulate musical instrumentation anyway, not excluding rhythmic handclapping.]

Their multi-tasking capabilities are admirable? No, I wouldn’t bother to sit in the balcony where I could watch Keith’s musicians perform. But picture this during the observance of the Lord’s Supper (even if not all of these tasks occur at the same time)—holding a microphone … holding [?] and reading the sheet music and singing … partaking of the bread … humming … doing the ooh-ooh-ooh-ooh-ooh … [clapping is one of those activities but is not done here] … partaking of the cup … more humming or making those unintelligible sounds … being in sync with the projected words on the screen vs. the sheet music … etc., etc. Oh, plus … worshipping or really commemorating the suffering and death of the Savior … while busily performing various tasks!

Oops … yes, an example of another 7/11 musical piece that occupies 2 full pages in Keith’s notebook of some 200+ “Songs of Worship.” On the front cover at the bottom, it says: “A supplemental song booklet compiled by the Worship Ministry of the Madison Church of Christ.” Believe me, it is THE MUSIC BOOK—not “a supplemental song booklet”—that the “contemporary worship” group uses. It is this group’s MAIN “praise” songbook. The regular hymnbook of 900 songs, as a matter of fact, is HARDLY supplemental. Why? Hymns are on the verge of extinction—this would make a good topic of discussion … by the way.

I’ll append the musical notes in order to give you an idea of why I think this piece is a musical exercise to perfection. Time sig. is 4/4 and key of b-flat … the repeated lines are mostly eighth notes.
  • TITLE: “Days of Elijah”

    <font color=indigo>[v.1] These are the days of Elijah … … …
    [v.1] These are the days of Your servant Moses … … …

    [v.2] These are the days of Ezekiel … … …
    [v.2] These are the days of Your servant David … … …

    [17 Signo] Behold He comes, riding on the clouds,
    shining like the sun at the trumpet call.
    So lift your voice, it’s the year of Jubilee
    and out of Zion’s hill salvation comes. And [to v.2] …
    comes. [2 D.S.] comes [3].

    There’s no God like Jehovah. [d-d-d-d-d-d-d-d]
    There’s no God like Jehovah. [e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e]
    There’s no God like Jehovah. [d-d-d-d-d-d-d-d]
    There’s no God like Jehovah. [c-c-c-c-c-c-c-c]
    There’s no God like Jehovah. [f-f-f-f-f-f-f-f]
    There’s no God like Jehovah. [g-g-g-g-g-g-g-g]
    There’s no God like Jehovah. [f-f-f-f-f-f-f-f]
    There’s no God like Jehovah. [f-f-f-f-f-f-f-f]
    There’s no God like Jehovah. [b-b-b-b-b-b-b-b]
    There’s no God like Jehovah. [b-b-b-b-b-b-b-b]
    There’s no God like Jehovah. [b-b-b-b-b-b-b-b]
    There’s no God like Jehovah. [a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a]
    There’s no God like Jehovah. [high d-d-d-d-d-d-d-d]
    There’s no God like Jehovah. [high e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e]
    There’s no God like Jehovah! [high d-d-d-d-d-d-d-dc] [D.S.] comes.

    Who was and Who is and Who is to come!
    Who was and Who is and Who is to come.</font>
_________________________________________

Did you keep up with the words and the number of repetitions and the way the music might sound to you?

Well … well … well! [I repeated “well” only three times … or four times?]

Donnie </font>
This entire thread is ridiculous.

MUSICAL GENRE OR STYLE IS NOT A SCRIPTURAL ISSUE.

There is a great discussion if it's instrumental vs. non-instrumental. Whether words are repeated is a non-issue. What's the magic number that's O.K. If the phrase repeat 3 times is that O.K., but 4 is wrong? We can't sing Psalms because they're from the O.T.? If you actually believe that, you missed the boat somewhere. We are not COMMANDED to sing from the songs, but it is nonsensical to think that it is somehow prohibited.

By the way, it might pay to look at actual scriptural issues with the songs. "Days of Elijah" talks about David rebuilding the temple. David didn't rebuild the temple; Solomon did. (Is it O.K. to say that; it's from the OT.) That thought is an error scripturally. Singing "there's no God like Jehovah" 10 or even 100 times is not.

"7/11 songs" is a trivial, condescending term. Speak the truth in love, brothers.
Quote
Share

B
B

June 27th, 2005, 2:55 pm #40

Note to editor -

That last post should have read, "We are not COMMANDED to sing from the Psalms" not songs. Could you please fix that?

Thanks.
Quote
Share