tail gates, long and lots of pictures

Ted Jensen
Ted Jensen

May 14th, 2008, 2:21 pm #1

Hey guys here is something that may help some. As you all are aware we are driving or restoring trucks that are over 50 years old in most cases. What we often find is that the elements have had ample opportunity to weaken and destroy parts that are expensive and sometimes hard to find. Now that I have a digital camera more pictures are taken and it is even easier to share. I hope no one gets tired of this input.
Most of the tail gates on the trucks that have come to my shop are in some way compromised. they are bent, dented and even rusted or greatly destressed in the hinge points. Often the part that attaches to the box is worn or rusted away. What follows is a discription of a fix that I have done now to three trucks.
Usually the ends of the tail gate where they fit the truck hinge point is expanded and fits loosly. I have found that by using the left over bearings from Champion, Commander or V8 waterpumps for the hinge is a great fix and makes for a very smooth operation of the tail gate. (i really do believe in recycling)
first here are the parts needed
[/IMG]
You will need to cut the round end plate so only two screw holes are left. They are almost the exact spacing necessary. Only one time have I needed to enlarge a hole on the box and that was because of damage.
[/IMG]

Press the end plate on the short end of the bearing.
[/IMG]
Then press it into the tail gate. This tail gate is from Mac's in Moberly Missouri. They probably supply most of the Studebaker venders, but when I lived in Missouri I picked this one up as they were right out my back door. Mac's tail gates fit the bearings perfactly. These gates feel heavier than OEM and the lettering is a little different. Will show that later.
[/IMG]

attached it will look like this
[/IMG]
It fits nice and moves real smoth.
[/IMG]

As for the Mac's Gate perhaps this photo will give some of the details. It is a Nice gate.
[/IMG]
Unless I have a set of good hinges and a gate that will fit them that is how I have been taking a worn, bent and otherwise distorted hinge point and making it look and feel good. Ted
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Transtar60
Transtar60

May 14th, 2008, 2:38 pm #2

I love it Ted. The bottom photo looks like to me, the Reproduction tailgate has letters that are a little "thicker", the original letters being slightly skinnier.

Charlie
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Peter
Peter

May 14th, 2008, 4:55 pm #3

Hey guys here is something that may help some. As you all are aware we are driving or restoring trucks that are over 50 years old in most cases. What we often find is that the elements have had ample opportunity to weaken and destroy parts that are expensive and sometimes hard to find. Now that I have a digital camera more pictures are taken and it is even easier to share. I hope no one gets tired of this input.
Most of the tail gates on the trucks that have come to my shop are in some way compromised. they are bent, dented and even rusted or greatly destressed in the hinge points. Often the part that attaches to the box is worn or rusted away. What follows is a discription of a fix that I have done now to three trucks.
Usually the ends of the tail gate where they fit the truck hinge point is expanded and fits loosly. I have found that by using the left over bearings from Champion, Commander or V8 waterpumps for the hinge is a great fix and makes for a very smooth operation of the tail gate. (i really do believe in recycling)
first here are the parts needed
[/IMG]
You will need to cut the round end plate so only two screw holes are left. They are almost the exact spacing necessary. Only one time have I needed to enlarge a hole on the box and that was because of damage.
[/IMG]

Press the end plate on the short end of the bearing.
[/IMG]
Then press it into the tail gate. This tail gate is from Mac's in Moberly Missouri. They probably supply most of the Studebaker venders, but when I lived in Missouri I picked this one up as they were right out my back door. Mac's tail gates fit the bearings perfactly. These gates feel heavier than OEM and the lettering is a little different. Will show that later.
[/IMG]

attached it will look like this
[/IMG]
It fits nice and moves real smoth.
[/IMG]

As for the Mac's Gate perhaps this photo will give some of the details. It is a Nice gate.
[/IMG]
Unless I have a set of good hinges and a gate that will fit them that is how I have been taking a worn, bent and otherwise distorted hinge point and making it look and feel good. Ted
Can one cut the top of the pce from the water pump so it is easier to get the tailgate off the back of the bed like one would with a Dodge? When cleaning up it is easier if one can take the tail gate off after hauling a load of gravel or man made dirt as the stuff gets caught in the crack between the tailgate and bed. SO if on cut a slot on an angle then one would not have to remove and replace the bolts all of the time.
I won't have this problem soon as I will be hauling this crap in a utility trailer from now on.
I learned another trick from a truck driver with a flatbed about preserving plywood. He takes a can of Red Tremclad and thins it out almost to water then rolls a dozen or so coats of it on the both sides and the edges to get it to go right through the board. He showed me plywood decks that have been on his flatbeds for 12-15 years and still look good. That's what I call getting ones $$$$$'s worth out of the wood. Trucks take a heavy beating from loads and to have them stand up like this is something else.
Ted thanks for the info on the water pump.
Peter
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jack vines
jack vines

May 14th, 2008, 4:57 pm #4

Hey guys here is something that may help some. As you all are aware we are driving or restoring trucks that are over 50 years old in most cases. What we often find is that the elements have had ample opportunity to weaken and destroy parts that are expensive and sometimes hard to find. Now that I have a digital camera more pictures are taken and it is even easier to share. I hope no one gets tired of this input.
Most of the tail gates on the trucks that have come to my shop are in some way compromised. they are bent, dented and even rusted or greatly destressed in the hinge points. Often the part that attaches to the box is worn or rusted away. What follows is a discription of a fix that I have done now to three trucks.
Usually the ends of the tail gate where they fit the truck hinge point is expanded and fits loosly. I have found that by using the left over bearings from Champion, Commander or V8 waterpumps for the hinge is a great fix and makes for a very smooth operation of the tail gate. (i really do believe in recycling)
first here are the parts needed
[/IMG]
You will need to cut the round end plate so only two screw holes are left. They are almost the exact spacing necessary. Only one time have I needed to enlarge a hole on the box and that was because of damage.
[/IMG]

Press the end plate on the short end of the bearing.
[/IMG]
Then press it into the tail gate. This tail gate is from Mac's in Moberly Missouri. They probably supply most of the Studebaker venders, but when I lived in Missouri I picked this one up as they were right out my back door. Mac's tail gates fit the bearings perfactly. These gates feel heavier than OEM and the lettering is a little different. Will show that later.
[/IMG]

attached it will look like this
[/IMG]
It fits nice and moves real smoth.
[/IMG]

As for the Mac's Gate perhaps this photo will give some of the details. It is a Nice gate.
[/IMG]
Unless I have a set of good hinges and a gate that will fit them that is how I have been taking a worn, bent and otherwise distorted hinge point and making it look and feel good. Ted
Hi, Ted,

Great idea. Wish I had had a couple of water pump cores lying around when I was doing mine.

Here's a way to reinforce the top and bottom round rails of the tailgate. I took 3/4 galvanized pipe, cut it to length and it was a drive-fit into the top and bottom rails of the stock Stude tailgate. Driving in the pipe actually straightened the slight kinks and dents in mine. I then welded solid caps of 1/8" steel to cover the ends of the pipe. The tailgate now feels twice as strong as stock. I'm not afraid to stand on it when loading or unloading.

thnx, jack vines
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Henry Votel
Henry Votel

May 14th, 2008, 5:41 pm #5

Hey guys here is something that may help some. As you all are aware we are driving or restoring trucks that are over 50 years old in most cases. What we often find is that the elements have had ample opportunity to weaken and destroy parts that are expensive and sometimes hard to find. Now that I have a digital camera more pictures are taken and it is even easier to share. I hope no one gets tired of this input.
Most of the tail gates on the trucks that have come to my shop are in some way compromised. they are bent, dented and even rusted or greatly destressed in the hinge points. Often the part that attaches to the box is worn or rusted away. What follows is a discription of a fix that I have done now to three trucks.
Usually the ends of the tail gate where they fit the truck hinge point is expanded and fits loosly. I have found that by using the left over bearings from Champion, Commander or V8 waterpumps for the hinge is a great fix and makes for a very smooth operation of the tail gate. (i really do believe in recycling)
first here are the parts needed
[/IMG]
You will need to cut the round end plate so only two screw holes are left. They are almost the exact spacing necessary. Only one time have I needed to enlarge a hole on the box and that was because of damage.
[/IMG]

Press the end plate on the short end of the bearing.
[/IMG]
Then press it into the tail gate. This tail gate is from Mac's in Moberly Missouri. They probably supply most of the Studebaker venders, but when I lived in Missouri I picked this one up as they were right out my back door. Mac's tail gates fit the bearings perfactly. These gates feel heavier than OEM and the lettering is a little different. Will show that later.
[/IMG]

attached it will look like this
[/IMG]
It fits nice and moves real smoth.
[/IMG]

As for the Mac's Gate perhaps this photo will give some of the details. It is a Nice gate.
[/IMG]
Unless I have a set of good hinges and a gate that will fit them that is how I have been taking a worn, bent and otherwise distorted hinge point and making it look and feel good. Ted
Hi Ted,

I'll never get tired of nice displays of tips with pics and details such as this one.

Keep'em coming.

Suggest you contact Web Master Bob Shaw of the SDC web site and have him link the displayed URL to the page at Studebaker Truck Talk. Then it will be easily accessed for future reference without a search in STT. Likely more people will see it too.

http://www.studebakerdriversclub.com/techtips.asp

Appreciate your time and effort.

Henry Votel
Forest Lake, MN
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TNshadetree
TNshadetree

May 14th, 2008, 6:43 pm #6

Hey guys here is something that may help some. As you all are aware we are driving or restoring trucks that are over 50 years old in most cases. What we often find is that the elements have had ample opportunity to weaken and destroy parts that are expensive and sometimes hard to find. Now that I have a digital camera more pictures are taken and it is even easier to share. I hope no one gets tired of this input.
Most of the tail gates on the trucks that have come to my shop are in some way compromised. they are bent, dented and even rusted or greatly destressed in the hinge points. Often the part that attaches to the box is worn or rusted away. What follows is a discription of a fix that I have done now to three trucks.
Usually the ends of the tail gate where they fit the truck hinge point is expanded and fits loosly. I have found that by using the left over bearings from Champion, Commander or V8 waterpumps for the hinge is a great fix and makes for a very smooth operation of the tail gate. (i really do believe in recycling)
first here are the parts needed
[/IMG]
You will need to cut the round end plate so only two screw holes are left. They are almost the exact spacing necessary. Only one time have I needed to enlarge a hole on the box and that was because of damage.
[/IMG]

Press the end plate on the short end of the bearing.
[/IMG]
Then press it into the tail gate. This tail gate is from Mac's in Moberly Missouri. They probably supply most of the Studebaker venders, but when I lived in Missouri I picked this one up as they were right out my back door. Mac's tail gates fit the bearings perfactly. These gates feel heavier than OEM and the lettering is a little different. Will show that later.
[/IMG]

attached it will look like this
[/IMG]
It fits nice and moves real smoth.
[/IMG]

As for the Mac's Gate perhaps this photo will give some of the details. It is a Nice gate.
[/IMG]
Unless I have a set of good hinges and a gate that will fit them that is how I have been taking a worn, bent and otherwise distorted hinge point and making it look and feel good. Ted
Where do I get a beautiful tailgate like that? And what do they cost?

Looks like my original just got designated to be a wall decoration.
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Matthew Burnette
Matthew Burnette

May 14th, 2008, 8:06 pm #7

Hey guys here is something that may help some. As you all are aware we are driving or restoring trucks that are over 50 years old in most cases. What we often find is that the elements have had ample opportunity to weaken and destroy parts that are expensive and sometimes hard to find. Now that I have a digital camera more pictures are taken and it is even easier to share. I hope no one gets tired of this input.
Most of the tail gates on the trucks that have come to my shop are in some way compromised. they are bent, dented and even rusted or greatly destressed in the hinge points. Often the part that attaches to the box is worn or rusted away. What follows is a discription of a fix that I have done now to three trucks.
Usually the ends of the tail gate where they fit the truck hinge point is expanded and fits loosly. I have found that by using the left over bearings from Champion, Commander or V8 waterpumps for the hinge is a great fix and makes for a very smooth operation of the tail gate. (i really do believe in recycling)
first here are the parts needed
[/IMG]
You will need to cut the round end plate so only two screw holes are left. They are almost the exact spacing necessary. Only one time have I needed to enlarge a hole on the box and that was because of damage.
[/IMG]

Press the end plate on the short end of the bearing.
[/IMG]
Then press it into the tail gate. This tail gate is from Mac's in Moberly Missouri. They probably supply most of the Studebaker venders, but when I lived in Missouri I picked this one up as they were right out my back door. Mac's tail gates fit the bearings perfactly. These gates feel heavier than OEM and the lettering is a little different. Will show that later.
[/IMG]

attached it will look like this
[/IMG]
It fits nice and moves real smoth.
[/IMG]

As for the Mac's Gate perhaps this photo will give some of the details. It is a Nice gate.
[/IMG]
Unless I have a set of good hinges and a gate that will fit them that is how I have been taking a worn, bent and otherwise distorted hinge point and making it look and feel good. Ted
Thanks for the info on that, the fix is great! I may do just that to the Orange truck, as my hinges have more rust than I'd like...

Matthew
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Matthew Burnette
Matthew Burnette

May 15th, 2008, 12:00 am #8

Hey guys here is something that may help some. As you all are aware we are driving or restoring trucks that are over 50 years old in most cases. What we often find is that the elements have had ample opportunity to weaken and destroy parts that are expensive and sometimes hard to find. Now that I have a digital camera more pictures are taken and it is even easier to share. I hope no one gets tired of this input.
Most of the tail gates on the trucks that have come to my shop are in some way compromised. they are bent, dented and even rusted or greatly destressed in the hinge points. Often the part that attaches to the box is worn or rusted away. What follows is a discription of a fix that I have done now to three trucks.
Usually the ends of the tail gate where they fit the truck hinge point is expanded and fits loosly. I have found that by using the left over bearings from Champion, Commander or V8 waterpumps for the hinge is a great fix and makes for a very smooth operation of the tail gate. (i really do believe in recycling)
first here are the parts needed
[/IMG]
You will need to cut the round end plate so only two screw holes are left. They are almost the exact spacing necessary. Only one time have I needed to enlarge a hole on the box and that was because of damage.
[/IMG]

Press the end plate on the short end of the bearing.
[/IMG]
Then press it into the tail gate. This tail gate is from Mac's in Moberly Missouri. They probably supply most of the Studebaker venders, but when I lived in Missouri I picked this one up as they were right out my back door. Mac's tail gates fit the bearings perfactly. These gates feel heavier than OEM and the lettering is a little different. Will show that later.
[/IMG]

attached it will look like this
[/IMG]
It fits nice and moves real smoth.
[/IMG]

As for the Mac's Gate perhaps this photo will give some of the details. It is a Nice gate.
[/IMG]
Unless I have a set of good hinges and a gate that will fit them that is how I have been taking a worn, bent and otherwise distorted hinge point and making it look and feel good. Ted
Right after I responded to this post the first time, I hopped in the '62 Lark I'm drivin' to make a run to the parts store. Right as I pulled into the parking lot, the radiator AND water pump both gave out! Got it full of water and limped the 2 miles to the shop. Found another radiator and another water pump; back on the road.

So, looks like I have enough parts so far to do one hinge!

Matthew
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Ted Jensen
Ted Jensen

May 15th, 2008, 2:12 am #9

Where do I get a beautiful tailgate like that? And what do they cost?

Looks like my original just got designated to be a wall decoration.
Studebaker International has tail gages and I think they are made by mac's. I do not have the link handy, but it is Mac's in Moberly Missouri. Others on this site know of it and may have the link. Ted
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ted Jensen
ted Jensen

May 15th, 2008, 2:13 am #10

Hi, Ted,

Great idea. Wish I had had a couple of water pump cores lying around when I was doing mine.

Here's a way to reinforce the top and bottom round rails of the tailgate. I took 3/4 galvanized pipe, cut it to length and it was a drive-fit into the top and bottom rails of the stock Stude tailgate. Driving in the pipe actually straightened the slight kinks and dents in mine. I then welded solid caps of 1/8" steel to cover the ends of the pipe. The tailgate now feels twice as strong as stock. I'm not afraid to stand on it when loading or unloading.

thnx, jack vines
Nice idea Jack. These tail gates do need help. Ted
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Ted Jensen
Ted Jensen

May 15th, 2008, 2:14 am #11

Hi Ted,

I'll never get tired of nice displays of tips with pics and details such as this one.

Keep'em coming.

Suggest you contact Web Master Bob Shaw of the SDC web site and have him link the displayed URL to the page at Studebaker Truck Talk. Then it will be easily accessed for future reference without a search in STT. Likely more people will see it too.

http://www.studebakerdriversclub.com/techtips.asp

Appreciate your time and effort.

Henry Votel
Forest Lake, MN
Thanks Henry I will need to play with that idea as it is a new area for me. Ted
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Jerry Kaiser
Jerry Kaiser

May 15th, 2008, 3:28 am #12

Hey guys here is something that may help some. As you all are aware we are driving or restoring trucks that are over 50 years old in most cases. What we often find is that the elements have had ample opportunity to weaken and destroy parts that are expensive and sometimes hard to find. Now that I have a digital camera more pictures are taken and it is even easier to share. I hope no one gets tired of this input.
Most of the tail gates on the trucks that have come to my shop are in some way compromised. they are bent, dented and even rusted or greatly destressed in the hinge points. Often the part that attaches to the box is worn or rusted away. What follows is a discription of a fix that I have done now to three trucks.
Usually the ends of the tail gate where they fit the truck hinge point is expanded and fits loosly. I have found that by using the left over bearings from Champion, Commander or V8 waterpumps for the hinge is a great fix and makes for a very smooth operation of the tail gate. (i really do believe in recycling)
first here are the parts needed
[/IMG]
You will need to cut the round end plate so only two screw holes are left. They are almost the exact spacing necessary. Only one time have I needed to enlarge a hole on the box and that was because of damage.
[/IMG]

Press the end plate on the short end of the bearing.
[/IMG]
Then press it into the tail gate. This tail gate is from Mac's in Moberly Missouri. They probably supply most of the Studebaker venders, but when I lived in Missouri I picked this one up as they were right out my back door. Mac's tail gates fit the bearings perfactly. These gates feel heavier than OEM and the lettering is a little different. Will show that later.
[/IMG]

attached it will look like this
[/IMG]
It fits nice and moves real smoth.
[/IMG]

As for the Mac's Gate perhaps this photo will give some of the details. It is a Nice gate.
[/IMG]
Unless I have a set of good hinges and a gate that will fit them that is how I have been taking a worn, bent and otherwise distorted hinge point and making it look and feel good. Ted
Great tip Ted.Speaking of Tail gates A Friend of mine knew I needed a tail gate for my 53 C-Cab.
He said he found me one for a good price that was straight and rust free. The only problem was that when I got it it was a later wider c-Cab tailgate. So I still need a straight tailgate for my 53.
Any one out there who has a good one they want to trade for a good 55 or later one?
If so email me and we can work something ouit
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Michael Webb
Michael Webb

May 15th, 2008, 3:58 am #13

Hey guys here is something that may help some. As you all are aware we are driving or restoring trucks that are over 50 years old in most cases. What we often find is that the elements have had ample opportunity to weaken and destroy parts that are expensive and sometimes hard to find. Now that I have a digital camera more pictures are taken and it is even easier to share. I hope no one gets tired of this input.
Most of the tail gates on the trucks that have come to my shop are in some way compromised. they are bent, dented and even rusted or greatly destressed in the hinge points. Often the part that attaches to the box is worn or rusted away. What follows is a discription of a fix that I have done now to three trucks.
Usually the ends of the tail gate where they fit the truck hinge point is expanded and fits loosly. I have found that by using the left over bearings from Champion, Commander or V8 waterpumps for the hinge is a great fix and makes for a very smooth operation of the tail gate. (i really do believe in recycling)
first here are the parts needed
[/IMG]
You will need to cut the round end plate so only two screw holes are left. They are almost the exact spacing necessary. Only one time have I needed to enlarge a hole on the box and that was because of damage.
[/IMG]

Press the end plate on the short end of the bearing.
[/IMG]
Then press it into the tail gate. This tail gate is from Mac's in Moberly Missouri. They probably supply most of the Studebaker venders, but when I lived in Missouri I picked this one up as they were right out my back door. Mac's tail gates fit the bearings perfactly. These gates feel heavier than OEM and the lettering is a little different. Will show that later.
[/IMG]

attached it will look like this
[/IMG]
It fits nice and moves real smoth.
[/IMG]

As for the Mac's Gate perhaps this photo will give some of the details. It is a Nice gate.
[/IMG]
Unless I have a set of good hinges and a gate that will fit them that is how I have been taking a worn, bent and otherwise distorted hinge point and making it look and feel good. Ted
Thanks for the very nice and well explained posting with photos Ted! That is great!
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Transtar60
Transtar60

May 15th, 2008, 4:42 am #14

Where do I get a beautiful tailgate like that? And what do they cost?

Looks like my original just got designated to be a wall decoration.
https://www.mackhils.com/mack_products/ ... tegoryNo=9

Also many Studebaker vendors and Classic enterprises also carry them I believe.
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David Orth
David Orth

May 15th, 2008, 1:16 pm #15

What I learned from Ted's excellent tech tip and Jack Vines tip could have saved me the trouble of buying a new tailgate. This forum is the best!! A note about Mackhills M series tailgates. I bought a gate for my M5 from them. It arrived twisted as in the photo. I called the owner and he agreed to fix it. I received a another similarly twisted. When I called him again, he me that they all had a twist. A third cross country round trip shipment produced a repaired unit that I've now used. The fix was to sandblast the metal hot enough to cause the correct amount of stretching to get the twist to lay flat.
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David Orth
David Orth

May 15th, 2008, 1:19 pm #16





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jack vines
jack vines

May 15th, 2008, 2:46 pm #17

Great tip Ted.Speaking of Tail gates A Friend of mine knew I needed a tail gate for my 53 C-Cab.
He said he found me one for a good price that was straight and rust free. The only problem was that when I got it it was a later wider c-Cab tailgate. So I still need a straight tailgate for my 53.
Any one out there who has a good one they want to trade for a good 55 or later one?
If so email me and we can work something ouit
I believe Studebaker widened the beds in 1956. The '49-'55 beds are all the same 48.5".

FWIW, some claim the later tailgates are made of stiffer gauge metal than the earlier beds. One local member said he narrowed the later tailgate and liked it better than an earlier one. If you have the metal-working skills or can find someone who does, consider that option.

thnx, jack vines
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Matthew Burnette
Matthew Burnette

May 15th, 2008, 11:48 pm #18

Hey guys here is something that may help some. As you all are aware we are driving or restoring trucks that are over 50 years old in most cases. What we often find is that the elements have had ample opportunity to weaken and destroy parts that are expensive and sometimes hard to find. Now that I have a digital camera more pictures are taken and it is even easier to share. I hope no one gets tired of this input.
Most of the tail gates on the trucks that have come to my shop are in some way compromised. they are bent, dented and even rusted or greatly destressed in the hinge points. Often the part that attaches to the box is worn or rusted away. What follows is a discription of a fix that I have done now to three trucks.
Usually the ends of the tail gate where they fit the truck hinge point is expanded and fits loosly. I have found that by using the left over bearings from Champion, Commander or V8 waterpumps for the hinge is a great fix and makes for a very smooth operation of the tail gate. (i really do believe in recycling)
first here are the parts needed
[/IMG]
You will need to cut the round end plate so only two screw holes are left. They are almost the exact spacing necessary. Only one time have I needed to enlarge a hole on the box and that was because of damage.
[/IMG]

Press the end plate on the short end of the bearing.
[/IMG]
Then press it into the tail gate. This tail gate is from Mac's in Moberly Missouri. They probably supply most of the Studebaker venders, but when I lived in Missouri I picked this one up as they were right out my back door. Mac's tail gates fit the bearings perfactly. These gates feel heavier than OEM and the lettering is a little different. Will show that later.
[/IMG]

attached it will look like this
[/IMG]
It fits nice and moves real smoth.
[/IMG]

As for the Mac's Gate perhaps this photo will give some of the details. It is a Nice gate.
[/IMG]
Unless I have a set of good hinges and a gate that will fit them that is how I have been taking a worn, bent and otherwise distorted hinge point and making it look and feel good. Ted
I've got a non usable 6 cylinder water pump. How the heck do I get it apart to use the shaft out of it?

Thanks,
Matthew
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Jerry Kaiser
Jerry Kaiser

May 16th, 2008, 2:50 am #19

I believe Studebaker widened the beds in 1956. The '49-'55 beds are all the same 48.5".

FWIW, some claim the later tailgates are made of stiffer gauge metal than the earlier beds. One local member said he narrowed the later tailgate and liked it better than an earlier one. If you have the metal-working skills or can find someone who does, consider that option.

thnx, jack vines
Thanks Jack I will do do that if I don't find some one to trade with.
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Frank Borowec
Frank Borowec

May 16th, 2008, 7:37 pm #20

I've got a non usable 6 cylinder water pump. How the heck do I get it apart to use the shaft out of it?

Thanks,
Matthew
Hey Matthew, you cant ask a dump question, you can only give a dump answer.
Today I take my waterpump apart.
The best is a hydraulic press to do this job.
You press the spindle from the inside out.
By the way, i need a rebuild kit for my waterpump.
Did anyone know where I can get one?
I have the 245 Commander engine # 6R21081.

Thank You
Frank from Germany



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Matthew Burnette
Matthew Burnette

May 16th, 2008, 9:37 pm #21

We've got a press here. Looks like I get to tear up something. <G>

Matthew
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Ted Jensen
Ted Jensen

May 18th, 2008, 2:15 am #22

I've got a non usable 6 cylinder water pump. How the heck do I get it apart to use the shaft out of it?

Thanks,
Matthew
Matthew: I wrote a long oration on how to rebuild a pump and then promply pressed a button that did not say post and it was gone. So here goes

First if the pump has been sitting for a few years it isn't likely rebuildable unless you have a seat cutting tool or a good lathe so you can dress and square the seat for the new seal. So on an old rusty long since used pump it doesn't matter how you get it apart. If it is a recent leaker like the one you have it could be rebuilt just using new parts.
You will need a press and you have so acknowledged. with the press you will need some heavy blocks like these. [/IMG]
Next pull the wire from the bottom of the pump. It holds the bearing from slipping from the barrel. [/IMG]
then press the fan mounting flange from the shaft.[/IMG]
Be sure to leave enough room under the pump so it does not contact the bed of the press.
Turn the pump over and press from the barrel of the pump. Most of these pumps are so old and the parts seated to the extent that if you try to press from the pump body you will break it. You must also besure to get a good purchase on the barrel so it does not cock sideways. Just press straight through the impeller and the bearing will come out the bottom.[/IMG]

Of course you can also just use a big hammer. Cast iron breaks real easy.
Ted
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Matthew
Matthew

May 18th, 2008, 2:52 pm #23

I might just try doing that today. Thanks!!

Matthew
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Matthew Burnette
Matthew Burnette

May 21st, 2008, 2:02 am #24

Hey guys here is something that may help some. As you all are aware we are driving or restoring trucks that are over 50 years old in most cases. What we often find is that the elements have had ample opportunity to weaken and destroy parts that are expensive and sometimes hard to find. Now that I have a digital camera more pictures are taken and it is even easier to share. I hope no one gets tired of this input.
Most of the tail gates on the trucks that have come to my shop are in some way compromised. they are bent, dented and even rusted or greatly destressed in the hinge points. Often the part that attaches to the box is worn or rusted away. What follows is a discription of a fix that I have done now to three trucks.
Usually the ends of the tail gate where they fit the truck hinge point is expanded and fits loosly. I have found that by using the left over bearings from Champion, Commander or V8 waterpumps for the hinge is a great fix and makes for a very smooth operation of the tail gate. (i really do believe in recycling)
first here are the parts needed
[/IMG]
You will need to cut the round end plate so only two screw holes are left. They are almost the exact spacing necessary. Only one time have I needed to enlarge a hole on the box and that was because of damage.
[/IMG]

Press the end plate on the short end of the bearing.
[/IMG]
Then press it into the tail gate. This tail gate is from Mac's in Moberly Missouri. They probably supply most of the Studebaker venders, but when I lived in Missouri I picked this one up as they were right out my back door. Mac's tail gates fit the bearings perfactly. These gates feel heavier than OEM and the lettering is a little different. Will show that later.
[/IMG]

attached it will look like this
[/IMG]
It fits nice and moves real smoth.
[/IMG]

As for the Mac's Gate perhaps this photo will give some of the details. It is a Nice gate.
[/IMG]
Unless I have a set of good hinges and a gate that will fit them that is how I have been taking a worn, bent and otherwise distorted hinge point and making it look and feel good. Ted
I made me one of those hinges today using a water pump. Got it all together and on the truck, seems to work great! Just need to find another junk pump to make another one with. <g>

Thanks for the tip, Ted. Good work!

Matthew
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Danny
Danny

September 6th, 2009, 7:33 pm #25

Hey Matthew, you cant ask a dump question, you can only give a dump answer.
Today I take my waterpump apart.
The best is a hydraulic press to do this job.
You press the spindle from the inside out.
By the way, i need a rebuild kit for my waterpump.
Did anyone know where I can get one?
I have the 245 Commander engine # 6R21081.

Thank You
Frank from Germany


I have been finding a lot of parts at www.studebakerparts.com
I think they might have a new waterpump, you won't have to rebuild, that is what I would do.
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Joined: April 23rd, 2016, 2:11 pm

May 3rd, 2016, 1:56 pm #26

Hey guys here is something that may help some. As you all are aware we are driving or restoring trucks that are over 50 years old in most cases. What we often find is that the elements have had ample opportunity to weaken and destroy parts that are expensive and sometimes hard to find. Now that I have a digital camera more pictures are taken and it is even easier to share. I hope no one gets tired of this input.
Most of the tail gates on the trucks that have come to my shop are in some way compromised. they are bent, dented and even rusted or greatly destressed in the hinge points. Often the part that attaches to the box is worn or rusted away. What follows is a discription of a fix that I have done now to three trucks.
Usually the ends of the tail gate where they fit the truck hinge point is expanded and fits loosly. I have found that by using the left over bearings from Champion, Commander or V8 waterpumps for the hinge is a great fix and makes for a very smooth operation of the tail gate. (i really do believe in recycling)
first here are the parts needed
[/IMG]
You will need to cut the round end plate so only two screw holes are left. They are almost the exact spacing necessary. Only one time have I needed to enlarge a hole on the box and that was because of damage.
[/IMG]

Press the end plate on the short end of the bearing.
[/IMG]
Then press it into the tail gate. This tail gate is from Mac's in Moberly Missouri. They probably supply most of the Studebaker venders, but when I lived in Missouri I picked this one up as they were right out my back door. Mac's tail gates fit the bearings perfactly. These gates feel heavier than OEM and the lettering is a little different. Will show that later.
[/IMG]

attached it will look like this
[/IMG]
It fits nice and moves real smoth.
[/IMG]

As for the Mac's Gate perhaps this photo will give some of the details. It is a Nice gate.
[/IMG]
Unless I have a set of good hinges and a gate that will fit them that is how I have been taking a worn, bent and otherwise distorted hinge point and making it look and feel good. Ted
I'm no genius, but I can read and follow directions. very visual. So, the attached photos on the tailgate fix say "PHOTO NOT FOUND" on the post by Ted. Do you think it's my computer (I'm running Windows 10)? I need the photos to follow the instruction. My e-mail is : aresykes@yahoo.com if the photos can be sent.

Thanks,

Rick Sykes
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