Need some advise about starting my engine after a 4 year vacation

Need some advise about starting my engine after a 4 year vacation

Joined: October 12th, 2014, 12:09 am

November 5th, 2016, 6:56 pm #1

My engine was purchased used from a member of this site about 4 years ago. It is s 169 6 cyl. The member said it ran great and was only available because another member wanted to get a 245 installed so he shipped it out to me (the integrity of the person who sold me that engine is above reproach so that doeesn't even weight into the senerio)

Ok that is the history

Now my questions - I plan on being ready to start this engine in about 2-3 months so:

My plan is to take out the plugs and put a bit of Mystery Oil in each cylinder now before I try and start it 0r turn the engine over a few times by hand in a month or so.

Next add engine oil and I'm going to use Shell Rotella T non-synthetic as as the engine had been run and is most likely somewhat old. Any issues with the oil I'm using? No filter yet as I can't get oil gallery plugs out.

Do I need to somehow prime the oil system prior to starting the engine or turning it over a few times by hand? If so how best would this be done. All of my oil external passage plugs seem to be stuck in place and I have not been able to remove any of them. Can I put a screw driver in a drill motor and place that down under where the distributor goes and spin the pump?

next turn it over by hand a few times

I will add water to the radiator to begin with then move to antifreeze when I know AI have no leaks or rework to do.

New gas into a repuilt carburator and new fuel pump and filter using a remote gas can until starting and running well in garage then hook up cleaned gastank.

Try starting it for real!

Any other thoughts or advise?

Thanks in advance

Keith
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Joined: October 9th, 2004, 1:18 am

November 5th, 2016, 11:30 pm #2

Unlike some of the V8s, you can't just pull the distributor and spin the oil pump. In the Champion 6 engine, the oil pump is driven from a cam gear, so the engine has to turn to make it work. In the ideal world, you would pull the oil pump and pack it with Vaseline to prime. It's probably not necessary. Many people have just cranked an old engine over after it sat for many years.

However, if you do want to squirt some oil to the main and rod bearings before starting it, a pressurized oiler connected to the oil gallery will enable that. I made one out of some steel pipe, two pipe caps, and a tire valve stem. See the attached photo. What the picture doesn't show is that I added a valve so I could fill the pipe and connect the tube before the oil ran out. I put about 30-40 psi of air into the pipe, connected the tube, and opened the valve. I'd suggest doing this a few times, turning the engine over part of a revolution each time to be sure the oil passages are open.

To get one of the gallery plugs out, place a washer over the square plug head, MIG weld the washer to the head, then weld a 5/16 or 3/8 nut to the washer. Between the heat and the torque on the nut, the plug will come out. Be sure to put the MIG welder ground directly on the block near the plug so you don't burn out anything.

When you do start it, have someone watch the oil pressure gauge to make sure that you get pressure in a few seconds or shut it down.




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Joined: October 12th, 2014, 12:09 am

November 6th, 2016, 4:04 am #3

You did the welding with a MiG so what type of wire did you use? Normally welding to cast iron, not cast steel is tricky! Did it spit and spatter a lot, did you do any preheating ad I assume you cleaned it real well. Also before welding the washer to the plug had you tried just applying heat to see if it would come loose?






regards
Keith
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Joined: October 13th, 2014, 1:31 am

November 6th, 2016, 5:16 pm #4

If you don't want to deal with removing the oil gallery plugs,you should be able to tap into the oil line for the gauge. It's all inter-connected.
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Joined: October 12th, 2014, 4:39 pm

November 6th, 2016, 10:25 pm #5

You did the welding with a MiG so what type of wire did you use? Normally welding to cast iron, not cast steel is tricky! Did it spit and spatter a lot, did you do any preheating ad I assume you cleaned it real well. Also before welding the washer to the plug had you tried just applying heat to see if it would come loose?






regards
Keith
the same giving the engine an oil enema. I used a PVC pipe but same principle. As to the plugs, never had a issue removing any of the plugs but I also changed them from the steel (not cast iron) plug to brass ones.
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Joined: October 15th, 2014, 1:19 am

November 7th, 2016, 6:21 pm #6

Unlike some of the V8s, you can't just pull the distributor and spin the oil pump. In the Champion 6 engine, the oil pump is driven from a cam gear, so the engine has to turn to make it work. In the ideal world, you would pull the oil pump and pack it with Vaseline to prime. It's probably not necessary. Many people have just cranked an old engine over after it sat for many years.

However, if you do want to squirt some oil to the main and rod bearings before starting it, a pressurized oiler connected to the oil gallery will enable that. I made one out of some steel pipe, two pipe caps, and a tire valve stem. See the attached photo. What the picture doesn't show is that I added a valve so I could fill the pipe and connect the tube before the oil ran out. I put about 30-40 psi of air into the pipe, connected the tube, and opened the valve. I'd suggest doing this a few times, turning the engine over part of a revolution each time to be sure the oil passages are open.

To get one of the gallery plugs out, place a washer over the square plug head, MIG weld the washer to the head, then weld a 5/16 or 3/8 nut to the washer. Between the heat and the torque on the nut, the plug will come out. Be sure to put the MIG welder ground directly on the block near the plug so you don't burn out anything.

When you do start it, have someone watch the oil pressure gauge to make sure that you get pressure in a few seconds or shut it down.



Why not just put a wrench on it as is and take it out? Works for me. Maybe I'm missing something.
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Joined: October 12th, 2014, 12:09 am

November 7th, 2016, 6:40 pm #7

the cap is in too tight and most likely is rusted too. The idea of a nut welded to it is so there are 6 points to grab on instead of 4. I think Lee has offered a good alternative but I would still like to be able to put an oil filter on it so I would need to get a plug or 2 out.

I am considering just using a torch to heat the plugs up to see if that helps me get them out too.

Well won't get back to it now for a few days as I have other committments till next weekend.

Keith
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Joined: October 13th, 2014, 1:31 am

November 7th, 2016, 9:00 pm #8

Why not just put a wrench on it as is and take it out? Works for me. Maybe I'm missing something.
Besides giving you more gripping surface, the intense localized heating and cooling down of welding a nut to the culprit will break things loose. The bottom door hinge screws are notorious for rusting solid and you wind up with broken studs remaining in the plate.
This is how I removed the buggers. Weld a nut to the nub that is sticking out.


Then use a wrench to zip out the remnants...most of the time, not always.

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Joined: October 15th, 2014, 1:19 am

November 8th, 2016, 1:06 am #9

Why not just put a wrench on it as is and take it out? Works for me. Maybe I'm missing something.
Came right out, never had a problem. Being an oil plug, you'd think some of the oil behind it would help keep it from rusting so tight all the way down that it couldn't be wrenched out. But I guess that isn't always the case. But being a square head, I've always made sure to use a proper sized tight fitting wrench to work them, not just a loose crescent wrench or pliers. But if someone has already mangled it up previously, you might be fighting a losing battle from the start.
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Joined: October 9th, 2004, 1:18 am

November 8th, 2016, 2:48 am #10

Why not just put a wrench on it as is and take it out? Works for me. Maybe I'm missing something.
Unfortunately, sometimes the gallery plugs ARE rusted in. The square heads are pretty small and round off easily, even with a 4-point socket or tightly-adjusted wrench. The washer goes on first so you can put a good blob of MIG weld on the rounded-off head and the washer. Then the nut goes on so that the O.D. of the nut can be welded to the washer. Now you've got a large-sized hex to grab with a real wrench. And, all that heat probably loosened it anyway. The MIG is better than an acetylene "flame wrench" at localizing the heat on the plug.
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