M Hood Fratures

M Hood Fratures

John Weinrich
John Weinrich

April 24th, 2012, 10:33 pm #1

I have seen several M hoods that are fractured on either side or both side about a foot back from the front. My truck had a fracture on one side that I fix with a patch.

Does anyone know what causes the fractures?

Is there a preventative fix?
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vern ediger
vern ediger

April 24th, 2012, 10:55 pm #2

In 1948 they came with a fix, they ran two rods from radiator support back to lower hood hinge.bolt. that took the flex out and stopped the breaking. maybe some one can post a picture
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John Weinrich
John Weinrich

April 24th, 2012, 11:10 pm #3

I guess they were added later??
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vern ediger
vern ediger

April 24th, 2012, 11:14 pm #4

they may have only been on M-16. going to yard later, will look
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vern ediger
vern ediger

April 25th, 2012, 1:05 am #5

I guess they were added later??
looked at M16 in the yard. they were gone. I am sure some one will post picture . they would be easy to make
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David Orth
David Orth

April 25th, 2012, 2:31 am #6

I have seen several M hoods that are fractured on either side or both side about a foot back from the front. My truck had a fracture on one side that I fix with a patch.

Does anyone know what causes the fractures?

Is there a preventative fix?
Hi John,

My M5 was full of cracks when I got it. The fenders had cracks and breaks in the rolled edges in the wheel openings, at the inner edge of the fenders at the mounting flange and around the stiffening plates. The hood had a fracture across the U-shaped stiffener that is an inch or so from the back edge of the hood. The doors at lower part of the the window openings were cracked. The bed had several cracks as did the tailgate. Some spot welds were broken loose as well. I can only guess that miles of bumpy roads and high carbon content steel made those big flappy sheet metal parts vulnerable to stress cracks.
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Roger List
Roger List

April 25th, 2012, 4:57 am #7

looked at M16 in the yard. they were gone. I am sure some one will post picture . they would be easy to make
According to the parts book, the radiator support rods were only used on M16s after M16-36319. The parts book shows that they also apply to M17s, but there is no footnote concerning the M17s. According to the monograph on the M series from the National Museum, the first '48 M16 was S/N M16-46735, so that means that the supports started in late 47.

Roger List
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Neil Wollam
Neil Wollam

April 25th, 2012, 5:27 am #8

Hi John,

My M5 was full of cracks when I got it. The fenders had cracks and breaks in the rolled edges in the wheel openings, at the inner edge of the fenders at the mounting flange and around the stiffening plates. The hood had a fracture across the U-shaped stiffener that is an inch or so from the back edge of the hood. The doors at lower part of the the window openings were cracked. The bed had several cracks as did the tailgate. Some spot welds were broken loose as well. I can only guess that miles of bumpy roads and high carbon content steel made those big flappy sheet metal parts vulnerable to stress cracks.
What did you do to fix the cracked rolled edges in fender wheel well(s)?
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Jeff Jones (the other one)
Jeff Jones (the other one)

April 25th, 2012, 8:45 pm #9

On my pickup I aligned the edges and straightened the panels, then welded everything back together. After I dressed the welds, I took 1/4" dia. solid round stock and bent it to fit around the lip of the fender. This is a pain as the material needs to be long enough to travel around the whole opening and what with the different arcs it gets pretty busy trying to keep everything in the proper planes and relationship to the original opening.

Once I got a good fit I used every clamp that I had to get everything as strong and stable as possible then I skip welded it in place.

Sounds easy huh? Not so much. But in the end they look great and are stronger than hell without adding a lot of weight.
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David Orth
David Orth

April 26th, 2012, 3:04 am #10

What did you do to fix the cracked rolled edges in fender wheel well(s)?
... and the bondo holes and the rust spots and the old turn signal lamp holes. I thought about putting a solid rod or a small diameter pipe of some kind behind the rolled edge. I thought better of it when I considered how I was going to get primer and paint in all the voids and crevices I would be creating. Here's some photos of my fenders being repaired.

http://s108.photobucket.com/albums/n22/ ... 20fenders/
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Tom Lovejoy
Tom Lovejoy

April 26th, 2012, 3:29 am #11

Very cool, thanks for sharing. My fenders are in terrible shape, especially my front's I think I will have to do all the above mentioned tactics.
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DwainG
DwainG

April 26th, 2012, 2:42 pm #12

On my pickup I aligned the edges and straightened the panels, then welded everything back together. After I dressed the welds, I took 1/4" dia. solid round stock and bent it to fit around the lip of the fender. This is a pain as the material needs to be long enough to travel around the whole opening and what with the different arcs it gets pretty busy trying to keep everything in the proper planes and relationship to the original opening.

Once I got a good fit I used every clamp that I had to get everything as strong and stable as possible then I skip welded it in place.

Sounds easy huh? Not so much. But in the end they look great and are stronger than hell without adding a lot of weight.
A lot of cars had a heavy wire reinforcement inside the rolled edge of the fender. When a fender has split, the wire is usually broken also. Our local rod builder rolls the fender bead open and replaces the wire as part of the repair.
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Jeff Jones(the other one)
Jeff Jones(the other one)

April 26th, 2012, 9:59 pm #13

... and the bondo holes and the rust spots and the old turn signal lamp holes. I thought about putting a solid rod or a small diameter pipe of some kind behind the rolled edge. I thought better of it when I considered how I was going to get primer and paint in all the voids and crevices I would be creating. Here's some photos of my fenders being repaired.

http://s108.photobucket.com/albums/n22/ ... 20fenders/
After I got mine all welded up, I prepped the surface and dabbed POR 15 down into the joint between the skin of the fender and the round stock. I know you can't attend to every happenstance but I try. I am hoping to pass this along to my favorite niece some day.
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Peter
Peter

April 28th, 2012, 3:45 am #14

... and the bondo holes and the rust spots and the old turn signal lamp holes. I thought about putting a solid rod or a small diameter pipe of some kind behind the rolled edge. I thought better of it when I considered how I was going to get primer and paint in all the voids and crevices I would be creating. Here's some photos of my fenders being repaired.

http://s108.photobucket.com/albums/n22/ ... 20fenders/
plus their hoods popped up about the centre in either side one took a 2 X 4 about 2' long and laid it on top and then hit with a sledge hammer putting the edges back in place then with the item the made to fix this you installed it and the problem was gone. The fenders on either side would split and all I did was weld them back up and painted them with Tremclad, once they split in a few spots they never did it again.
So Studebaker is not the only company with this problem.
Peter
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Scott Grainger
Scott Grainger

April 29th, 2012, 10:13 pm #15

I have seen several M hoods that are fractured on either side or both side about a foot back from the front. My truck had a fracture on one side that I fix with a patch.

Does anyone know what causes the fractures?

Is there a preventative fix?
When I restored Toto, I attempted using rods similar to what is described above and found it very difficult to get a good match to the curves. Also tried bending sheet metal to fit inside the L shape but the compound curves made it very difficult to get a good match. I used flat sheets of steel plate same gauge as the hood metal. With that fitting at the base of the L and making them about 4" tall I made sure of a nice tight fit and used epoxy to glue them to the inside of the hood both sides on the fron and also at the rear behind the hood hinge brackets. I think that this will work very well and does not require welding. My concern about the welding was I did not want to risk warping the hood. Also using the epoxy I was sure that all the space between the original hood sheet metal and the patch was filled so it won't trap water in the future.
Scott
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